BSA Bottom Bracket - grease or anti-seize?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
Kurets
Posts: 154
Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2016 9:55 pm

by Kurets

This back and forth discussion is really just reaffirming the point I was initially trying to make. There are lots of opinions because it doesn't matter much. Grease prevents water from getting in, therefore no corrosion. Anti sieze does the same with the same result. Exceptions exists, like very humid or salty environments, where you need to use anti sieze to avoid thread galling. But most of our "nice" bikes are not exposed to that.
This is just the same as chain lubricant threads, as it isn't a very tough application, pretty much everything works ok. So, all discussion boils down to personal preference, thus being endless.

by Weenie


Mr.Gib
Posts: 3199
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2005 4:12 pm
Location: eh?

by Mr.Gib

I let my local LBS (very good mechanic) face and install the Campy BSA cups into my Colnago Extreme Power (I didn't have a facing tool). In speaking to him I have now learned that he used grease. The BB is titanium, and the cups IIRC are Aluminum. Doesn't that demand anti-seize?

Should I be concerned? The bike is only used in good weather but a decade may pass before I touch that bb.

And what is that yellow stuff that comes on the threads? Thread locker?
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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Calnago
Posts: 6557
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

If a decade may pass before you touch the BB, especially if it’s titanium, then yes... pull it and use antiseize. Otherwise I agree with @Kurets... doesn’t matter so much as long as you pull it every now and then. I’ve been using Morgan Blue AquaProof Paste for these types of things lately. It’s clear and much easier to use than the copper based stuff that I’ve used in the past.
That yellowish threadlocker on the threads of Campy cups is usually very thickly applied. I like to remove as much of it as possible with an awl and just use whatever antiseize you prefer.
My best story about a seized BB was relating to my buddy who always asks if they make my new kit in a men’s version. He had a Colnago Dream and the BB seemed seized to the threads. He thought he’d cut it out by inserting a hacksaw blade through the BB then cutting just enough to reach the threads. Well he reached the threads all right but it still wouldn’t budge. Months later his wife called me explaining what he did and “not to tell Cal”. Ha. I told him to bring it over and we eventually managed to get it out with some very unique techniques. I did get to use my Italian BB taps for the very first and only time. But it did save his frame.
Moral of the story: Antiseize in your BB threads is your friend.
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Carcinogent
Posts: 35
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 4:37 pm
Location: France

by Carcinogent

Calnago wrote:
Thu Feb 22, 2018 6:46 am
If a decade may pass before you touch the BB, especially if it’s titanium, then yes... pull it and use antiseize. Otherwise I agree with @Kurets... doesn’t matter so much as long as you pull it every now and then. I’ve been using Morgan Blue AquaProof Paste for these types of things lately. It’s clear and much easier to use than the copper based stuff that I’ve used in the past.
That yellowish threadlocker on the threads of Campy cups is usually very thickly applied. I like to remove as much of it as possible with an awl and just use whatever antiseize you prefer.
My best story about a seized BB was relating to my buddy who always asks if they make my new kit in a men’s version. He had a Colnago Dream and the BB seemed seized to the threads. He thought he’d cut it out by inserting a hacksaw blade through the BB then cutting just enough to reach the threads. Well he reached the threads all right but it still wouldn’t budge. Months later his wife called me explaining what he did and “not to tell Cal”. Ha. I told him to bring it over and we eventually managed to get it out with some very unique techniques. I did get to use my Italian BB taps for the very first and only time. But it did save his frame.
Moral of the story: Antiseize in your BB threads is your friend.

That and make sure your BB shell has a drain hole. Otherwise even antiseize would not help if you ride in wet and gritty conditions. Ask me how i know.....it involved a hammer and the longest wrench i could find and (sadly) a prefectly good Chris King bottom bracket that does not have a perfect finish anymore.

We live and we learn.=)

freehub
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2018 2:23 pm

by freehub

Kurets wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 10:16 am
The reason for there not being a clear answer is that it doesn't matter much. Both will lubricate the threads and limit water ingress and corrosion in the threads. However, anti-seize will likely do a better job at corrosion protection if you start getting moisture in there. But, if you keep on top of maintaining your bikes you'll most likely replace or refit the BB long before that becomes an issue.
Best answer. Either. Have used both. In general, I use grease.

Fiery
Posts: 420
Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2013 9:21 am

by Fiery

kidrob wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 9:09 am
I have Finish Line Ceramic Grease or Tacx Carbon Assembly Compound to choose from. Could also do a mix...
Here is your problem: one of those is grease, but the other one is not anti-seize. So, of the two, use the grease. If you can get your hands on actual anti-seize, use that.

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