Patching latex inner tubes

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
alcatraz
Posts: 975
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

Hey fellow WW's

I read that it's possible to patch latex inner tubes using self made patches cut from an old later inner tube and regular rubber cement from any repair kit. Is this information accurate?

Is the process the same as patching butyl tires? Is there anything to watch out for?

I don't have a spare latex inner tube. Are there any common items that can be used as a substitute? For example can a piece from an ikea rubber glove be used instead I wonder?

I normally never have any flats until one of my tires need replacement which happens to be the case now. I'm just looking to fix my inner tubes that have worked wonderfully. (They are kind of pricey where I live. Just got a slow leak.)

Thanks for the help.
/a

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dj97223
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Joined: Sun Nov 06, 2005 7:27 pm

by dj97223

I've used a regular butyl patch to repair latex tubes -- no problem.
“If you save your breath I feel a man like you can manage it. And if you don't manage it, you'll die. Only slowly, very slowly, old friend.”

by Weenie


sungod
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by sungod

yes, you can use patches and vulcanising solution from a normal repair kit

i've used rema tt04 (sport) patches many times when repairing my veloflex tubs, they work fine, not too thick and a very smooth feathered edge

also pay attention to the tyre carcass, if the puncture was really small it may be ok, but the edge of larger cuts can abrade the tube and it will fail again (same applies when repairing a tub)

you can put a rema patch on the inside of the carcass to cover the edges of a small cut, or use a piece of fabric carcass trimmed to fit (this is better for larger cuts), either way use contact adhesive to fix the patch to the inside of the carcass, make sure there are no rough edges, put some talc on it to stop the tube sticking to it

alcatraz
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Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

By carcass do you mean the casing of a tubular tire? I'm running normal clinchers...

Thank you for the great replies!

One thing that worries me with using butyl patches is that they are way thicker than the tube. The tube is also quite thin diameterwise. Won't a thick patch stress the area around the tube a lot since it won't stretch at all? It'll act like a pinched tube when inflated. No?

Like you said a thin patch is a better fit perhaps...

The reason I'm asking and maybe seeming a bit like a nitpick is because these latex tubes happen to be the ultra light ones. Like 50gr each. Quite thin. Surprisingly resiliant when riding but not very robust to the feel when holding them.

/a

sungod
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by sungod

latex is incredibly stretchy, unless the tube is way undersized for the tyre i would not be concerned using the tt04 patch, i've used them many times without issue

carcass is just the tyre body, whether clincher or tub

1415chris
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Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2009 8:59 am
Location: Surrey UK

by 1415chris

Standard patches will not stretch as the latex does. It can create stress points around the patch.
How serious the problem is, I do not know. I admit, I used to fixed latex with normal patches, but that was long ago and it was with my first latex tubes, so I didn't have any latex donor :)
Now I keep pre-cut patches from Vredestein tube and glue them using Rema green solution.
Before applying the glue to both patch and tube, clean surface using alcohol based solution (no paper sanding).

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ms6073
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by ms6073

sungod wrote:yes, you can use patches and vulcanizing solution from a normal repair kit

Is 'vulcanising solution' the same thing as Rema Cold Vulcanizing Fluid 203? I had read past threads on patching latex tubes (not tubulars) in which the same reference was made, but after ordering a can and attempting to use a piece of latex from either a Michelin or Vittoria latex tube to patch another of the same brand, I have yet to find success. A review of the products technical data sheet would suggest it is for repairing cuts in automotive inner tubes and tires, as when the fluid dries, it does not cause the patch to adhere to the surface of latex tube being patched.
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basilic
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Location: Geneva, Switzerland

by basilic

The little green tube from any Rema patch kit works just fine

Butcher
Shop Owner
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by Butcher

I'm no engineer, but I have a difficult time understanding how a latex tube stretch more in a tire than a butyl tube. The space inside the tire is pretty much the same at the same pressure.

sungod
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by sungod

ms6073 wrote:
sungod wrote:yes, you can use patches and vulcanizing solution from a normal repair kit

Is 'vulcanising solution' the same thing as Rema Cold Vulcanizing Fluid 203? I had read past threads on patching latex tubes (not tubulars) in which the same reference was made, but after ordering a can and attempting to use a piece of latex from either a Michelin or Vittoria latex tube to patch another of the same brand, I have yet to find success. A review of the products technical data sheet would suggest it is for repairing cuts in automotive inner tubes and tires, as when the fluid dries, it does not cause the patch to adhere to the surface of latex tube being patched.


no idea about that rema 203, they make many products

i've used velox fluid ok, but i do not let it dry if i'm joining latex-latex, i suggest retry the rema 203 and see if the latex bonds while still wet

for home repairs the velox 10ml tubes are fine, but they sell a big tin too...

http://velox.fr/en/44-cement-dissolution

1415chris
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Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2009 8:59 am
Location: Surrey UK

by 1415chris

I use svs-vulc as pictured, the same stuff you can find in small green tubes.

Image

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nickf
Posts: 580
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2010 10:34 pm

by nickf

I use a piece of old latex tube and some rubber cement i got from home depot. Works great.

ntb1001
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Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2014 4:38 pm

by ntb1001

yup...butyl patch

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alcatraz
Posts: 975
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

I ended up trying a piece of a latex glove (ikea potkes) and so far the tube is holding it's air pressure fine.

A nice part of the glove (facepalm) is that you have a few different thicknesses to choose from. Closer to the wrist and it gets real thin, closer to the fingers and it's very thick.

I used the method suggested above. Wiping with alcohol and making sure the surfaces were really clean before applying the normal vulcanizing agent. One thing I noticed is that the latex is more reactive to the agent than a butyl tube and patch. I suggest using the agent sparingly to not disintegrate the tube and patch :D

/a

by Weenie


sungod
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Location: it's raining, it must be uk

by sungod

an alternative to patching would be to borrow a method used when replacing a latex tube in a tub, you cut the tube then splice it back together...

cut the tube across the puncture, clean the outside of one end (apply some talc on the inside of this end) and the inside of the other (no talc)

* insert one end inside the other about 1cm, now the fiddly bit is getting the vulcanising fluid into the overlap area fast enough

if you worked fast and well, you now have a working inner tube again - but if you messed up you have a problem :)


* there's an alternate splicing method shown here...
http://www.velonews.com/2010/03/bikes-a ... -it_107464

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