Trek Émonda 2018

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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Calnago
Posts: 6011
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Yes, it does... but there was a good period of time where externally routed cables combined with ever increasing downtube diameters made the practice fade away somewhat because it became impossible to cross underneath the downtube. But now with the oversized tubes and internal routing it makes this type of routing even more desirable, functionally and aesthetically. And the emonda routing makes this especially easy...
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Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

jeffy
Posts: 1255
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2014 11:51 pm

by jeffy

Calnago, have you had any issues with paint rubbing off or other marks due to the same side entry of the rear brake?

anyone know the official launch date?

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Calnago
Posts: 6011
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

No problems with paint rubbing through, but I don't like that it even touches. It's only a matter of time and use. More importantly, I don't like the rather acute bends the cable has to make in order to get there, whereas it's a much smoother route from the right lever to the left side of the top tube. Of course, that works in reverse if you have your rear brake linked to the left shifter as in the UK (is that still as prevalent as ever over there?). I've often wondered why that was, and the only reason I could come up with is when riding on the left side of the road and turning to your right to look behind you etc., the "feather brake" is the rear, so if you're on the left side of the road looking to your right, your left hand is the one mostly in control, versus if you're riding on the right side of the road turning around to your left, then your right hand is where you want that feathered control. I don't know... but it's the only theory for the differences that I could ever think of. Sorry for the off topic, but if anyone has a better theory or knows if that's the reason or what the real reason is... I'd love to know for sure.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

FIJIGabe
Posts: 1400
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2012 6:07 pm
Location: The Lone Star State

by FIJIGabe

Calnago, the only thing I would change on your bike is to give it to me. I love the build!
Madone 9 https://goo.gl/7UwZpV
Crockett https://goo.gl/f5PdCN
Madone 5 https://goo.gl/cMdyFo

Madone 4, Cobia. I own a lot of Treks.

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Calnago
Posts: 6011
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Thanks... it's really a great bike, I'd like to try an Emonda SLR in my size some day, but it's just so damn light, and I'm not, that I have reservations how it would react on a technical and fast downhill with 200lbs of beastly ugliness on it. I've found super light bikes to feel very responsive, but not forgiving, almost brittle feeling. I'm happy with anything around the 7-7.5kg mark at my size. Even that Emonda SL I built up initially came in at under 6.8kg. It's very comfortable.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

FIJIGabe
Posts: 1400
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2012 6:07 pm
Location: The Lone Star State

by FIJIGabe

I love my old Madone 5. It's really similar to your Emonda, with the exception of the under BB brakes. I'm with you on the weight front: I was able to get that bike down to around 7.5kg, w/ DA9000, and it felt great, albeit, stiff. My new Madone 9 weighs about the same, but is more comfortable. I'm at 220lbs (working on getting lower, but I'm also 6'4"), and need a solid bike underfoot. That's why I loved my old Madone and love the new one (along with my Crockett).
Madone 9 https://goo.gl/7UwZpV
Crockett https://goo.gl/f5PdCN
Madone 5 https://goo.gl/cMdyFo

Madone 4, Cobia. I own a lot of Treks.

Imaking20
Posts: 1538
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2011 5:19 am

by Imaking20

FIJIGabe wrote:
congbab wrote:Madon is more desirable than emonda.


Really, based on what? I love my Madone, but when climbing, I'd much rather have a lighter Emonda.


Lots of climbing in Texas, huh? :P
Current:
T2

Retired:
Blue | Project C6.0 | Felt AR FRD | Colnago C59 NERO | 2014 S-Works Tarmac | S-Works Venge | Wilier Cento Uno SL | Tarmac SL2

glepore
Posts: 1100
Joined: Thu Mar 28, 2013 4:42 pm
Location: Pa USA

by glepore

Calnago wrote:No problems with paint rubbing through, but I don't like that it even touches. It's only a matter of time and use. More importantly, I don't like the rather acute bends the cable has to make in order to get there, whereas it's a much smoother route from the right lever to the left side of the top tube. Of course, that works in reverse if you have your rear brake linked to the left shifter as in the UK (is that still as prevalent as ever over there?). I've often wondered why that was, and the only reason I could come up with is when riding on the left side of the road and turning to your right to look behind you etc., the "feather brake" is the rear, so if you're on the left side of the road looking to your right, your left hand is the one mostly in control, versus if you're riding on the right side of the road turning around to your left, then your right hand is where you want that feathered control. I don't know... but it's the only theory for the differences that I could ever think of. Sorry for the off topic, but if anyone has a better theory or knows if that's the reason or what the real reason is... I'd love to know for sure.

Don't know the real reason, but it sure helps if you motorcycle a lot to have the front on the right hand. I suspect because most folks are right dominant it makes sense that way. I have two bikes set up the opposite way and it takes about 30 sec to adjust for the duration.
Cysco Ti custom Campy SR mechanical (6.9);Cannondale SS Evo Di2 7970 (5.79); Willier Cento Uno Air Di2 9070 (7.0); C40 Mk2 DA 7800 ; Anvil Custom steel Etap;1996 Colnago Technos Record

jeffy
Posts: 1255
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2014 11:51 pm

by jeffy

basically all issues that America has been struggling with for the passed century have been largely a consequence of not using a moto-style bicycling braking configuration

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Calnago
Posts: 6011
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Lol... I just had a feeling that was the problem here. I'm switching. :). Thanks!!
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ


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keith
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Jul 16, 2008 10:38 pm
Location: North Wales
Contact:

by keith

Anyone seen anything of the disc version yet? Could be a good winter / wet bike :D
Riding my road bike in North Wales

http://www.strava.com/athletes/keith_robertson

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TonyM
Posts: 2155
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 4:11 pm

by TonyM

keith wrote:Anyone seen anything of the disc version yet? Could be a good winter / wet bike :D


See post #19 answering my same question:

spartan wrote:according the UCI two new emonda frames were approved rim and disc version on the 18 emonda.

stay tune for th official release eom.

a lot of new bikes

cervelo r5, bmc slr, specialized tarmac, trek emonda, shimano ultegra 8x, colnago vr2

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keith
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Jul 16, 2008 10:38 pm
Location: North Wales
Contact:

by keith

TonyM wrote:
keith wrote:Anyone seen anything of the disc version yet? Could be a good winter / wet bike :D


See post #19 answering my same question:

spartan wrote:according the UCI two new emonda frames were approved rim and disc version on the 18 emonda.

stay tune for th official release eom.

a lot of new bikes

cervelo r5, bmc slr, specialized tarmac, trek emonda, shimano ultegra 8x, colnago vr2


Yes, seen that thanks, and other rumours too. Same question though, has anyone actually seen one yet :)
Riding my road bike in North Wales

http://www.strava.com/athletes/keith_robertson

User avatar
TonyM
Posts: 2155
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 4:11 pm

by TonyM

I am also looking for my rain/ winter bike and will most probably go for a Tarmac disc or a Canyon Endurance disc.
Would you prefer the Emonda over the tarmac or Endurance? if yes, why?

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