Budget Workstand recommendations

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
eaglejackson
Posts: 257
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2014 5:26 am
Location: PNW

by eaglejackson

BRM wrote:You only try to find confirmation for your thoughts.

That you never had a problem and that according you almost every us shop use them will not say it's the way to go. It is not a right reference imo.

Why can't you just visualize what the cons are of a clamp style workstand?
- scratches
- not safe for carbon
- less stable

You can go enjoy using your stand and I'll be happy using mine. It's a big beautiful world. Bye bye

by Weenie


User avatar
BRM
Posts: 817
Joined: Sun Mar 16, 2014 3:43 pm

by BRM

Lol, this is not about you and not about me.
It's about giving the right info and recommendation based on something more than your limited personal experience.

eaglejackson
Posts: 257
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2014 5:26 am
Location: PNW

by eaglejackson

BRM wrote:Lol, this is not about you and not about me.
It's about giving the right info and recommendation based on something more than your limited personal experience.

Haha, stop into a bike shop sometime. They'll show you how to use a clamp style stand properly. It's what they are using in the shop.

Team style stands work fine, too. A little less convenient, perhaps, than a clamp style. Either one, used properly, will work safely and securely.

(If you don't have a round seat post, then I'd definitely recommend a team style stand. OTOH, if you have a front fender, the team style stand doesn't work well.)
Last edited by eaglejackson on Fri Apr 28, 2017 7:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Bigger Gear
Posts: 326
Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2009 6:58 pm
Location: Wet coast, Canada

by Bigger Gear

I have a Feedback Sports stand that I bought back in 2003, when they were known as Ultimate. My stand would equate to the current Feedback Sports Classic. It might actually be the single best value piece of anything I have owned in cycling, along with my Kreitler Rollers (from 1996!!). It has an infinite adjust clamp, it is very stable, it packs up small and it is reasonably light.

About 3-4 years ago I bought a Park PRS-20. It is nice, but honestly I find it clunky as all can be for quick work. It's good for bigger endeavours like bike building where I want to access both sides of the bike easily, but for general cleaning and lubing and quick adjustments I reach for the Feedback every time. Also, living in the PNW, the PRS-20 is 100% incompatible with a bike that has front fender. IMO the PRS-20 style stand is really only the better choice for a TT/aero bike that does not have a seatpost that is easily clamped.

If I could only have one, I would have the Feedback.

eaglejackson
Posts: 257
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2014 5:26 am
Location: PNW

by eaglejackson

Bigger Gear wrote:I have a Feedback Sports stand that I bought back in 2003, when they were known as Ultimate. My stand would equate to the current Feedback Sports Classic. It might actually be the single best value piece of anything I have owned in cycling, along with my Kreitler Rollers (from 1996!!). It has an infinite adjust clamp, it is very stable, it packs up small and it is reasonably light.

About 3-4 years ago I bought a Park PRS-20. It is nice, but honestly I find it clunky as all can be for quick work. It's good for bigger endeavours like bike building where I want to access both sides of the bike easily, but for general cleaning and lubing and quick adjustments I reach for the Feedback every time. Also, living in the PNW, the PRS-20 is 100% incompatible with a bike that has front fender. IMO the PRS-20 style stand is really only the better choice for a TT/aero bike that does not have a seatpost that is easily clamped.

If I could only have one, I would have the Feedback.

Totally agreed. I'm in the PNW too. Team style stands and bikes with fenders don't mix well. Same as clamp style stands and non-round seatposts.

I put my Feedback Sports team style (PRS-20 style) stand away in storage because I found, like you, that I reached for the Feedback Sports clamp style stand every time. It's just a lot more convenient for everyday type stuff.

Bigger Gear
Posts: 326
Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2009 6:58 pm
Location: Wet coast, Canada

by Bigger Gear

eaglejackson wrote:
Bigger Gear wrote:I have a Feedback Sports stand that I bought back in 2003, when they were known as Ultimate. My stand would equate to the current Feedback Sports Classic. It might actually be the single best value piece of anything I have owned in cycling, along with my Kreitler Rollers (from 1996!!). It has an infinite adjust clamp, it is very stable, it packs up small and it is reasonably light.

About 3-4 years ago I bought a Park PRS-20. It is nice, but honestly I find it clunky as all can be for quick work. It's good for bigger endeavours like bike building where I want to access both sides of the bike easily, but for general cleaning and lubing and quick adjustments I reach for the Feedback every time. Also, living in the PNW, the PRS-20 is 100% incompatible with a bike that has front fender. IMO the PRS-20 style stand is really only the better choice for a TT/aero bike that does not have a seatpost that is easily clamped.

If I could only have one, I would have the Feedback.

Totally agreed. I'm in the PNW too. Team style stands and bikes with fenders don't mix well. Same as clamp style stands and non-round seatposts.

I put my Feedback Sports team style (PRS-20 style) stand away in storage because I found, like you, that I reached for the Feedback Sports clamp style stand every time. It's just a lot more convenient for everyday type stuff.


As always the N+1 rule applies, even for workstands :D

eaglejackson
Posts: 257
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2014 5:26 am
Location: PNW

by eaglejackson

BRM wrote:Lol, this is not about you and not about me.
It's about giving the right info and recommendation based on something more than your limited personal experience.

Here's a timely review published on April 27, 2017 in CyclingTips of the Park PRS-22 team style repair stand. https://cyclingtips.com/2017/04/park-tool-prs-22-team-issue-repair-stand-review/ It covers all the pros as well as the cons of this type stand.

The section before conclusion is titled "Race Stand or Clamp Style?"

For me, as a home user, this was the main question I had when reviewing the PRS-22. Would I buy this over a clamp-type stand?

The benefits of a race repair stand are without question there. The bike is extremely stable and well supported, something that’s especially important for the latest generation of ultra-light or weirdly-shaped aero machines. The bike typically sits at a more comfortable working height and you can swing it so that the opposite side of the bike comes to you. Lastly, you have a set base to perform headset repairs, along with handlebar and saddle adjustments from. The appeal is no doubt there.

Still, my preference still sits with the shop clamp-type stands (grabbing the seatpost, never the frame) I grew up using. And with the latest wide-opening and stubby clamps that work on just about all aero or weirdly shaped seatposts, I have little to complain about.

Here, the ease of simply mounting the bike whole makes up for the inability to work on the seatpost or swinging the bike to you. And with the advent of disc brakes on all types of bikes, this opinion is only made stronger. Head to any cross or mountain bike race, and you’ll only see my preference further reinforced.

Add in that you can’t adjust the working angle of the bike in a race stand (not in a locked state, at least), which can be the secret recipe for working with some internally cabled frames or hydraulic disc brakes, and such a stand seems to be all the more troubled.

If you’re shopping for your first stand, the clamp-type Park Tool PRS-10 remains high on my list. It’ll last forever, is easy to use, stable and can be found at a great price. I can say similar things for Feedback Sports Consumer stands too.


And in the Conclusion he states:
My loyalty still lies with a tube-clamp stand, but the Park Tool PRS-22 is very good, dare I say the best, if you’re set on this style of transportable stand.

ernestkus
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Nov 16, 2013 2:46 am

by ernestkus

I choose 'team stand' style for one reason. I want to wash my bike on it.

I just loose the joint, and I can flick it left and right, even rotate it 360 no problem
I use Minoura brand, I bought it while in Japan. Very lightweight, easy to bring out for washing, and store them inside if not in use

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