Boonens #and Sagans# Roubaix without disc and Cobra seat post:

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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Calnago
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by Calnago

@Leiblingsleguan: Interesting... yes, I know the geometry of Boonen's bike is different, that is easily seen. Was just wondering if the bike offered to the public would have this geometry, but seems it's just a paint job. I actually quite like the look of Boonen's Roubaix. And yes, I had also heard that the spring in Boonen's bike was much stiffer than the standard spring. Wonder if that spring at least will be available to the public. Doubt it.

I'm a fan of the rear iso-speed on the Treks. But not so much on the front. Seems the engineering involved is way overkill for the amount of flex it could generate over such a short span. Specialized likes to call Trek's front iso-speed "fork splay". They say their spring is better than "fork splay". "Fork splay", clearing referring to Trek's front iso-speed. Two approaches to front "suspension", but not really. Ha ha... let the gimmick wars begin.

I haven't actually seen the race (Paris Roubaix) yet... as where I am it was a payperview kind of thing at the time and being shown this evening. I tried watching on live streaming for awhile, but kept getting cut out. Managed to watch the entire Flanders event that way and it was awesome. I'll have to catch up on Paris Roubaix this evening, even though I know what happened.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
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by Weenie


jeffy
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by jeffy

Calnago, have you tried Eurosport player via Euro based VPN?

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Calnago
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by Calnago

No, by the time I was watching the race was pretty much over, but I would have gladly have paid for the event. I will be more ready next time. But thanks for the tip.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

AJS914
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by AJS914

I had luck with the stream from http://tiz-cycling.racing/

Lieblingsleguan
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by Lieblingsleguan

kgt wrote:I am happy that finally Roubaix got rid of these ugly zertz inserts...

Why? Are you gonna buy one now?
Calnago wrote:@Leiblingsleguan: Interesting... yes, I know the geometry of Boonen's bike is different, that is easily seen. Was just wondering if the bike offered to the public would have this geometry, but seems it's just a paint job.

Ah, now I see what you meant :-).
Calnago wrote:I'm a fan of the rear iso-speed on the Treks. But not so much on the front. Seems the engineering involved is way overkill for the amount of flex it could generate over such a short span. Specialized likes to call Trek's front iso-speed "fork splay". They say their spring is better than "fork splay". "Fork splay", clearing referring to Trek's front iso-speed. Two approaches to front "suspension", but not really. Ha ha... let the gimmick wars begin.

And - taking the upper bearings ability away to take rotational loads creates higher bearing forces and torques on the lower bearing. Tom Meussens' Trek Boone head tube with the same front isospeed cracked in half at the lower bearing at this years' CX world championships. Id really like to hear the internal discussions at Trek after that...
Calnago wrote:No, by the time I was watching the race was pretty much over, but I would have gladly have paid for the event. I will be more ready next time. But thanks for the tip.

You can watch the entire race via Eurosport Player after the event for one week. Watched it in the evening as I didn't have time to see it live.

Nefarious86
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by Nefarious86

Cal have you actually tried a Head shock Roubaix or are you dribbling uninformed assumptions? I was pretty sceptical too till I test rode one, the front end is not an issue when sprinting or out of the saddle if its set up properly. Yes the bike feels a bit different but its not anything like most people assume.
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Calnago
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by Calnago

Mostly I'm dribbling uninformed assumptions of my own, but not totally unfounded I would say, given that Boonen opted for a very stiff spring up there himself. I've bounced around on one, and could see there being some benefit if you're constantly riding over cobbles, since it would surely ease some of the jarring to the wrists and hands, but on decent pavement I can't see it as anything but an annoying gimmick. I can ride all day with no discomfort in the hands/wrists and never once thought "geez... it'd be nice if I had a spring between my stem and headset".

On the other hand, there was one long mountain highway descent we did one year on one ride, where unknown to us beforehand the roads were completely chewed up and getting ready for repaving... meaning the entire stretch of highway was like a long ribbon of "rumble strips" those horizontal washboards they cut into the shoulders of US highways so when sleepy truck drivers veer off the main drag they are sure to be woken up. Descending 20 miles or so over that stuff and yes... I would have truly welcomed something, anything, to relieve the machine gun like jarring. But aside from that, never.

But I will for sure give one a go if I ever get the chance, just to see for sure, but I'm not expecting my assumptions to be swayed. But if they are, I'll for sure own up to it and tell of my experience. The description of a disconcerting feeling during climbing and sprints was confirmed to me by a dealer of Specialized who attended one of their "try it out" sessions. Could you get used to it? Probably. But unless I had a lot of non paved roads to navigate, I can't see it being of much use, to me. Of course, your roads may warrant it. I don't know.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
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Calnago
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by Calnago

Lieblingsleguan wrote:
Calnago wrote:I'm a fan of the rear iso-speed on the Treks. But not so much on the front. Seems the engineering involved is way overkill for the amount of flex it could generate over such a short span. Specialized likes to call Trek's front iso-speed "fork splay". They say their spring is better than "fork splay". "Fork splay", clearing referring to Trek's front iso-speed. Two approaches to front "suspension", but not really. Ha ha... let the gimmick wars begin.

And - taking the upper bearings ability away to take rotational loads creates higher bearing forces and torques on the lower bearing. Tom Meussens' Trek Boone head tube with the same front isospeed cracked in half at the lower bearing at this years' CX world championships. Id really like to hear the internal discussions at Trek after that...


I wasn't aware of that, but very interesting as well. I've also heard, and believe, that unless you have the preload on that system set exactly right, there can be some "clunking" involved, which makes sense if you see the internals of how it's all put together. The clunking would be the equivalent of having a loose headset on a normal road bike.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ


Nefarious86
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by Nefarious86

Apologies for being so standoffish this morning, posting before I get up isn't the brightest idea...

If it was set up with the soft spring I could see why it felt a bit unusual and personally id run it with the stiffest spring supplied to soak up only the bigger hits because as you say, for most roads its overkill.
Had they have given it a bit more clearance and fender mounts I'd be all over it but unfortunately for an every day bike it falls a tad sort on the list of things I want in my next dailly.
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jeffy
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by jeffy

Calnago wrote:given that Boonen opted for a very stiff spring up there himself


that's an assumption again. If you watch the coverage - at the very beginning (on the start line) you see Boonen pushing down and it moves fairly easily.
The bikes come with three different springs. You can believe that somehow Boonen gets a spring that makes it "not shit" whereas the public only get the "shit" springs - but that just a little silly.

CarlosFerreiro
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by CarlosFerreiro

From the CyclingNews article riders were using a custom spring developed for "pros on cobbles" forces.

"Specialized Racing's Chris D'Alusio explained to BikeRadar today that Quick Step and Specialized worked together to test a variety of different springs for racing on the cobbles. The final product was a stiff, progressive spring that ramps at both ends of the travel; it's harder to initially engage and harder to bottom out than any of the three stock springs, but relatively softer in the middle of the 20mm of travel, like a parabola.
The hits from the cobbles are so jarring that the stiffest of the stock springs bottomed out too quickly, D'Alusio said."

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Calnago
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by Calnago

jeffy wrote:
Calnago wrote:given that Boonen opted for a very stiff spring up there himself


that's an assumption again. If you watch the coverage - at the very beginning (on the start line) you see Boonen pushing down and it moves fairly easily.
The bikes come with three different springs. You can believe that somehow Boonen gets a spring that makes it "not shit" whereas the public only get the "shit" springs - but that just a little silly.

Not an assumption... has been discussed in several articles how Boonen's bike has a special spring, I think in one article they described it as more "tuned to his liking". And in another... "Boonen's bike uses a different shock spring than what's found on stock models, however, providing a more progressive shock absorption that will feel more natural on smooth pavement or when sprinting in the velodrome". From Velonews article.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

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