Long Distance Bike Ritchey Road Logic 2.0 vs Colnago Master

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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Calnago
Posts: 5785
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

AJS914 wrote:It seems like if you aren't racing, one could challenge themselves in many more pleasurable ways on a bike. Personally, I'd rather do a supported ride around Italy and end the day with a beautiful meal, a glass of wine, and a comfortable bed but that is me.
Me too! :beerchug:


However, I have done a fair bit of long distance self contained touring as well, up to 8 weeks at a time, in various locales around the world, albeit with a proper touring bike which was fully loaded, like 90lbs/40kg (bike and gear). But never the 24 hour endurance type stuff that you're talking about here. I would agree that riding day after day like that does change your metabolism (unless you were doing that before), but despite what was just said, I will never agree that "it is very easy to ride 24hours straight on a bike", even for a good rider. There have been times when I've just been cruising along just zoning out, and have gotten so relaxed that I indeed, came very close to falling asleep on the bike. I pull over at those times and have a nap. Those days are long gone for me now, however. But some great memories remain.

But good for you if you take on the challenge... and if you do, I hope you document the entire trip and post up here so we can follow along and (sort of, but not really) feel your pain.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

AJS914
Posts: 1952
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

Yes, if you do something like this, please blog it here as I'll be glad to follow along.

Looking at that road.cc link again, it's interesting that he is using a hiking Garmin GPS. I guess that is because you can run it for 40 hours between charges.

Managing technology on such a ride is an interesting question. My Garmin 510 wouldn't work since it needs a charge much too frequently. One obviously wants to carry a smart phone. I guess you keep it off most of the day to save battery. One might also need an external usb battery pack on such a ride to keep the tech charged up. Maybe charging at rest stops would be good enough?

mattr
Posts: 3480
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

You can get a dynamo hub, a powerpack as a buffer and a USB socket in the top of the steerer.
Some Garmins can be "bodged" to take a power feed while they are running (something like a modified power only cable, no data connection).

CarlosFerreiro
Posts: 304
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 1:41 pm
Location: Shetland, Scotland

by CarlosFerreiro

Yeah, if you need to charge on the go from a battery or dynamo then a OTG (On The Go) USB cable is easy to get hold of and will let Garmins charge while they keep recording.
I think the attraction of the Garmin Josh Ibbett had is that you just replace the batteries with standard AA when they run out, no charging time or tech needed.


AJS914
Posts: 1952
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

CarlosFerreiro wrote:I think the attraction of the Garmin Josh Ibbett had is that you just replace the batteries with standard AA when they run out, no charging time or tech needed.


That totally makes sense. Just buy a couple AAs at a gas station on route.

RussellS
Posts: 701
Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2010 1:31 am

by RussellS

Calnago wrote: but despite what was just said, I will never agree that "it is very easy to ride 24hours straight on a bike", even for a good rider.


No. With good conditioning and training and experience, it is very easy to ride for 24 hours straight. You are stopping for food and drink every 50 miles or so. The human body can easily stay awake for 24 hours. I realize the norm of being awake for 16 hours and sleeping for 8 hours is the norm. But the body does not automatically turn off like a hot air dryer you push the button in the bathroom. Yes you might not want to ride 24 hours very much. You may be unhappy, tired, injured. But the body does not just snap, click turn off after X pedal revolutions or hours. Its helpful to have some mental focus and keep concentrated on a goal to justify riding 24 hours.

Zakalwe
Posts: 432
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 3:15 pm

by Zakalwe

Sounds like it's doable then, rather than very easy.

Marin
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Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:48 am
Location: Vienna Austria

by Marin

I agree - people all around the world stay up for 24hrs+ every Friday and Saturday, and cycling doesn't have to be more exhausting than partying.

The key is probably to not push too hard. I know that after about 6 or 7 hours of racing / hard riding I can't put out more than 260W even for a very short climb, with an FTP of around 330.

Despity my criticsm of the events a few posts earlier, this thread makes me want to go on really really long ride - my longest so far having been only 270k. Did almost 30kph avg solo throught the Alps though :)

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