Dedicated Winter Bike

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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markgoldstein
Posts: 76
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2014 11:53 am
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by markgoldstein

After years of using a summer bike with SKS Raceblades or Crudguards fitted, I'm contemplating adding a "proper" winter bike to the stable. So far, I'm thinking that these are must-haves:

- disc brakes, preferably full hydraulic
- mudguard mounts
- rack mounts
- clearance for at least 28mm tyres with mudguards fitted

I'm not too fussed about frame material - it seems to be a choice between cheaper alloy and more expensive steel if you want full mounts. I am struggling to find something with similar geometry to my summer bike (Cannondale Supersix) - most of the manufacturers seem to assume that winter = an armchair ride...

So any suggestions that meet the above criteria? I'm also curious as to what kind of bike everyone else uses once Autumn is upon us again...

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Mockenrue
Posts: 388
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 10:32 am
Location: UK

by Mockenrue

Kinesis 4S Disc. Satisfies all your criteria. I've used the original version (TK3) for two winters now and it's more than good enough, and not excessively heavy.

by Weenie


campbellrae
Posts: 546
Joined: Mon Jul 11, 2011 8:20 am
Location: Glasgow, Scotland

by campbellrae

I use a Niner RLT 9 that I bought as a frame and built up with Ultegra mechanical/R685 hydraulic brakes. I love it. It's a gravel/whatever they are marketing that sector as these days bike, but has loads of tyre clearance and good geometry. I'm currently running 40s that come up around 45mm on my rims and I still have clearance for guards(just). I prefer a gravel/CX bike for winter because if it snows I can stick some knobbly tyres on and still ride.

The 59cm frame that I use has a 585mm top tube and 185mm head tube, so fairly long and low compared to a lot of road bikes these days. The only disadvantage for me is the slack head angle, 72 degrees in my size, makes the turn in a bit slower than I'd like.

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BRM
Posts: 817
Joined: Sun Mar 16, 2014 3:43 pm

by BRM

markgoldstein wrote:
I am struggling to find something with similar geometry to my summer bike (Cannondale Supersix) - most of the manufacturers seem to assume that winter = an armchair ride...


Or you are not flexible enough to see that a winter bike can be a bike with different ride qualities and geometry. . .

:wink:

RussellS
Posts: 701
Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2010 1:31 am

by RussellS

What do you mean by "winter" bike? Based on your description of your ideal bike, I am guessing we are at very opposite ends of the scales. You seem to think a "winter" bike is a bike you use when its maybe not sunny and above 80 degrees. Oh my!!!! To me "winter" means snow and ice and temperatures below freezing. Very different bikes required. In winter I use an old 1970s single speed with 35mm studded tires and a couple of those plastic add on fenders. Cantilever brake on the front only. It gets me from point A to point B when required. Your "winter" seems like a cool summer day to me.

mattr
Posts: 3477
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

I use a kinesis racelight tK and my wife has a t. Geometry is only mildly different from their race frames.

Get one of the current disc models and you won't go far wrong. Not expensive either.

And ignore Mr Grumpy, everyone else knew what you meant by the spec.
(35mm studs wouldn't get me out of the drive here, need full on snow gear for 2 months of the year. I've still got a winter bike.)

markgoldstein
Posts: 76
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2014 11:53 am
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by markgoldstein

I mean a British winter, so mostly wet, cold and occasionally icy...

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romalor
Posts: 251
Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2015 3:56 pm

by romalor

buy a caad12 disc frame set from sigma sport uk
for 840 euro approximately

and then build it as your want
nearly same geo
best bang for buck

bmCube
Posts: 41
Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2011 8:37 pm

by bmCube

trek crockett disc

deltree
Posts: 198
Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2012 10:21 pm
Location: London, UK

by deltree

romalor wrote:buy a caad12 disc frame set from sigma sport uk
for 840 euro approximately

and then build it as your want
nearly same geo
best bang for buck


FYI the disc version of the frameset looks like an absolute nightmare to mount full mudguards.

bm0p700f
in the industry
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Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 7:25 pm
Location: Glermsford, Suffolk U.K
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by bm0p700f

Kenesis 4S disc or genesis equilibrium disc.

Kenesis do a titanium frame too which means no corrosion ever.

MikeyBE
Posts: 243
Joined: Wed Jul 30, 2014 6:59 pm

by MikeyBE

If you are in the UK, get a Kinesis... Or perhaps just pick up a cross bike....?

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bikewithnoname
Posts: 999
Joined: Tue Sep 22, 2009 1:29 pm
Location: UK

by bikewithnoname

Keeping the same geo, whilst adding larger tyres and guards doesn't really work as you'll need longer stays, different fork length/rake potentially. But a "racey" bike that can take guards you might want to look at Mason bikes or Kinesis

Alternatively I've found that Portland design works full metal fenders to be a pretty solid bolt on fender that would probably fit your super6
"We live in an age when unnecessary things are our only necessities." Oscar Wilde

Pegoretti Responsorium, Parlee Z5i, Donhou Commuter, 1946 MacLeans Featherweight L'Eroica!, 2x MTB 'dales

cmcdonnell
Posts: 270
Joined: Sun Aug 02, 2015 7:50 pm

by cmcdonnell

I gave up last year looking for a winter bike as nothing seems to suit. I agree that the Kinesis bikes look great if they fit. I was keen on a GF Ti Disc but the smallest size has a stack 15 mm more than my normal bike and it made me really hunch my shoulders. I find it strange that some people think they should ride different geometry in the winter (unless you are riding off road or on icy roads maybe) as in the UK conditions are mostly the same as the summer just muckier and wetter. If you have a comfortable summer bike (maybe after x000's miles and / or a bike fit) then surely you want the winter bike to feel the same. It's a real bug bear of mine as even summer bikes seem to be getting taller at the front and shorter in reach, I suppose in response to most cyclists who buy expensive bikes being middle aged and probably unfit/overweight. I was interested in a Trek Madone but would need the H1 geometry and that would mean paying extra; why should I have to pay extra for what is the standard fit. yes I know it's all down to economics but it's still annoying; the paradox that when you can afford a race bike it doesn't fit you any more.

For me the perfect winter bike would be the Specalized Tarmac Disc but it can't easily take guards so no improvement on the imperfect Raceblade / Crud solution. Annoying as Discs make perfect sense in the winter and allow you enjoy half decent wheels too without chewing them up every couple of years.
Bianchi Oltre XR2 + Campagnolo Super Record 11 + Campagnolo Bora 50C
Litespeed T1 + Campagnolo Chorus 11 + Campagnolo Shamal Ultra

by Weenie


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MikeMoore
Posts: 75
Joined: Mon Jul 27, 2015 2:19 pm
Location: Midlands, UK
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by MikeMoore

I've got a Kinesis 4S (non-disc) and would thoroughly recommend the disc version. I would only be tempted to replace it with a GF Toi disc now.
Weight 72kg, FTP 289W => 4.01 W/kg

Custom ti 650B Kingdom Double9 (with tubs)
Kinesis Aithein
Kinesis Racelight 4S "Rain Bike"
Ventana El Conquistador

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