Seeking feedback on New Madone 9.9

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
CanadianBiker
Posts: 98
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2015 2:34 pm

by CanadianBiker

I was wondering if anyone has ridden the new madone and had feedback on the bike. I've never been a Trek fan but this bike has something unique and my LBS has a good deal on an H1 with SRAM Etap and the Trek-Segafredo colour. 90% of my riding is flats and most of my climbs are less then 11% incline. I'm a bigger boy at 95KG. I am curious how does it handle smaller climbs (I live in Eastern Canada not the Alps), how is the feel for longer rides most of my rides are 80-150kms.

I test rode an S-Work Tarmac for 3 weeks and really loved the Geo and the feel, I only took the Madone out for a few KMs but the H1 felt very good. My present bike is a cannondale Synapse with a 180 HeadTube and I run no spacers bike is also mounted with 6800, however my I do have a bit of back pain on the Synapse and I had 0 back pain on the Tarmac (rode it almost 1000kms).

Again any feedback or opinion would be greatly appreciated.

CanadianBiker
Posts: 98
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2015 2:34 pm

by CanadianBiker

Another quick question, considering all the cabling is internal on the Madone is it a waste to go Etap at the same price as DA Di2? I've always ridden Shimano but I am very intrigued by Etap.

by Weenie


pdlpsher1
Posts: 1599
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:09 pm
Location: CO

by pdlpsher1

If all the cables are internal I'd give the Di2 a slight edge. With cables you will have 100% reliability as far as shift signal transmission goes. Plus charging the Di2 internal battery is easier than eTap. With that being said Shimano is coming with a new and revised Dura Ace Di2. Just a rumor and no dates or details are available.

I'm a climber but also newly minted aerogeek. I just built up this Fuji Transonic. The aero benefit is quite amazing.

Image

russianbear
Posts: 757
Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2012 3:40 am

by russianbear

CanadianBiker wrote:Another quick question, considering all the cabling is internal on the Madone is it a waste to go Etap at the same price as DA Di2? I've always ridden Shimano but I am very intrigued by Etap.


I'd say this is the perfect bike for Etap. 2 fewer cables and housings to run.

I only rode one very briefly, the most noticeable thing compared to my Ridley was the comfort afforded by the isospeed decoupler in the seat tube.

CanadianBiker
Posts: 98
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2015 2:34 pm

by CanadianBiker

russianbear wrote:
CanadianBiker wrote:Another quick question, considering all the cabling is internal on the Madone is it a waste to go Etap at the same price as DA Di2? I've always ridden Shimano but I am very intrigued by Etap.


I'd say this is the perfect bike for Etap. 2 fewer cables and housings to run.

I only rode one very briefly, the most noticeable thing compared to my Ridley was the comfort afforded by the isospeed decoupler in the seat tube.


Thank you for feedback greatly appreciated, what kind of Ridley do you have?

CanadianBiker
Posts: 98
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2015 2:34 pm

by CanadianBiker

pdlpsher1 wrote:If all the cables are internal I'd give the Di2 a slight edge. With cables you will have 100% reliability as far as shift signal transmission goes. Plus charging the Di2 internal battery is easier than eTap. With that being said Shimano is coming with a new and revised Dura Ace Di2. Just a rumor and no dates or details are available.

I'm a climber but also newly minted aerogeek. I just built up this Fuji Transonic. The aero benefit is quite amazing.


Gorgeous bike, I'm looking forward to becoming an Aerogeek also. This is the first bike that makes want to go Aero.

pdlpsher1
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Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:09 pm
Location: CO

by pdlpsher1

CanadianBiker wrote:Gorgeous bike, I'm looking forward to becoming an Aerogeek also. This is the first bike that makes want to go Aero.


Thanks. GL with your purchase. I'm a smaller guy so on group rides I used to wait for the hills to make my move. Now with the Transonic I make my moves on the downhills. I never imagined that a bike change would also make me change my style of riding :D I'll admit part of the speed change is psychological. But it's so much fun when you are hammering at speed on an aero bike.

da123
Posts: 167
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:42 am

by da123

I have a Madone 9 in a H2 fit and have put around 600 miles on it so far (it is posted on the site if you want to have a look).

My other bikes are a Canyon Ultimate CF SLX (5.5kg) and a Schmolke Namur (5.9kg).

The Trek comes out at 6.75kg (size 52) with the Enve 4.5 wheels (including pedals, cages, Garmin mount). It is around 350g lighter than this with my Lightweights.

There is a noticeable speed benefit downhill and on flats / false flats. Maintaining speed is noticeably easier. I'm a lightish rider, and I usually have to pedal downhill to maintain pace with bigger / heavier riders on the Canyon and the Schmolke. On the Madone, I'm faster than almost anyone when freewheeling downhill. On rides overall, this does translate into faster times / higher average speeds. I regularly do an 80 mile ride with around 2800 feet of climbing (nothing steep). My best average prior to the Madone was just over 20mph. I did it for the first time on the Madone a couple of weeks ago and averaged 21.3. I've got a power meter, and although I was probably trying a little bit harder looking at average power (the new bike placebo effect!), it was only by a few watts, nothing that would otherwise explain an extra 1mph.

In terms of climbing, I'd say the Madone is quicker on anything up to 5%. 5 - 8% climbs are pretty much even with my other bikes. Over 8% or very long climbs my perception is the lighter bikes are quicker. I certainly notice the additional weight if the gradient is really steep (20% plus).

The ride is very good. On a par with my other bikes, both of which are pretty comfortable. It doesn't feel 'soft', it just filters out road buzz just as you'd expect of a non-aero bike with the usual comfort oriented features (i.e skinny seatstays, 25mm tyres, flexy seatpost). The best thing you can say is that it does not feel like you're riding an aero bike.

It is stiff. Objectively stiffer than the Canyon and the Schmolke at the BB and headtube, although I've seen the Tour magazine test that would suggest the Canyon is the stiffer bike. Acceleration is very good, and it is a great bike to close a gap on.

Downsides are few. The biggest one is cable rattle. It is prone to this, and from a number of different sources. The brake cable rattles, the vector wings can rattle. The Di2 cables can rattle. I've been back to the bike shop a number of times with this as I don't think cable rattle is acceptable on a 9k bike. Between us we've more or less got this resolved, but it has been a pain in the arse.

The geometry is a possible downside. Ideally, I'd be somewhere between H1 and H2 fit. The H1 is just too low for me however (30mm lower at the front end - 110 on a 52 size). I run the H2 with the stem unit slammed, which I think is a better look than a H1 with 25mm of spacers. I ride almost exclusively in the drops (on any bike). It wouldn't be such an issue if Trek did the bar/stem unit with a bigger drop on the bars, but they only do a compact geometry.

Overall however, I can't recommend the bike enough. I do think Trek have nailed it by eliminating the vast majority of the usual aero bike downsides (cable rattle and a bit of a weight penalty excepted), whilst keeping the speed benefit. I'm certainly not a Trek fanboy either - I've never had a Trek before or even been tempted by one.

pdlpsher1
Posts: 1599
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:09 pm
Location: CO

by pdlpsher1

da123, thanks for the review. Although I don't own a Madone I'm interested in hearing other people's experiences on an aero bike. And your experience matches my own. I also read your other postings and saw the pic of your bike. Very nice color and choice of equipment.

21mph is pretty impressive for a solo 80mi ride!

It's ironic that I weigh 62kg but rides a 7.8kg aero bike. But I really enjoy the aero benefit immensely.

One question for you. I don't see a pump nor a tool bag on your Madone. Where do you put these items on an aero bike? I'd like to hear about your solution if you have one. Thanks.

da123
Posts: 167
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:42 am

by da123

pdlpsher1 wrote:da123, thanks for the review. Although I don't own a Madone I'm interested in hearing other people's experiences on an aero bike. And your experience matches my own. I also read your other postings and saw the pic of your bike. Very nice color and choice of equipment.

21mph is pretty impressive for a solo 80mi ride!

It's ironic that I weigh 62kg but rides a 7.8kg aero bike. But I really enjoy the aero benefit immensely.

One question for you. I don't see a pump nor a tool bag on your Madone. Where do you put these items on an aero bike? I'd like to hear about your solution if you have one. Thanks.


I use a Vittoria tool bottle / container (the one with the zip) that I put in the bottle cage on the downtube. In here I have a gas cannister and inflator, a bottle of Tufo extreme sealant, a mini tool and tyre levers. I used to carry around a spare tub under the saddle, but I don't see the point if you have the sealant. I take the view that if the problem is so severe that sealant will not get you home, you're probably calling a taxi / your wife whether you've got a spare tub or not... I realise this takes up a bottle space, but I'm fine with one bottle unless the ride is really long / hot (and it ain't 'really hot' all that often in the UK!)

I don't think aero bikes are just for big guys. I'm 66kg and I think it will be quicker on anything apart from a ride in proper mountains. I do sort of miss the feeling you get climbing a super lightweight bike up a steep incline, although I've not tried the Madone with my Lightweight Obermayers yet, and I wonder whether that set up would be the ultimate for a holiday in really mountainous terrain. You'd lose a few watts on the flat / downhill over the ENVEs for sure, but the Lightweights are still more aero than a shallow section, and they climb like nothing else I've ridden. I'm off to Spain in June, so hopefully I'll find out (assuming I can figure out how to pack the bike of course...)

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Calnago
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Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

@da123: Excellent review, thanks. The Madone geometry and the Emonda geometry are the same, and I too find myself kind of smack in between the H1 and H2 fit. I chose the H2 for the Emonda but now that I've had it a while, and given my other bikes, I think I could have done an H1 fit (60cm) with a couple centimeters of spacers to get essentially the same fit as on my 61 Colnagos (which really are in between a Trek 60 H1 and H2.

You've touched on the one area I really don't know that I could live with on the Madone, or any bike with a lot of internal cables and flapping brake doors... and that is the rattling. I suppose with wireless that would go away, but so far, if eTap is any indication, I'm not big on the aesthetics and the huge derailleurs (with batteries)... I just prefer mechanical still for most applications except tt bikes, and any bike where the cable routing compromises a mechanical setup.
:beerchug:
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

da123
Posts: 167
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:42 am

by da123

Calnago wrote:@da123: Excellent review, thanks. The Madone geometry and the Emonda geometry are the same, and I too find myself kind of smack in between the H1 and H2 fit. I chose the H2 for the Emonda but now that I've had it a while, and given my other bikes, I think I could have done an H1 fit (60cm) with a couple centimeters of spacers to get essentially the same fit as on my 61 Colnagos (which really are in between a Trek 60 H1 and H2.

You've touched on the one area I really don't know that I could live with on the Madone, or any bike with a lot of internal cables and flapping brake doors... and that is the rattling. I suppose with wireless that would go away, but so far, if eTap is any indication, I'm not big on the aesthetics and the huge derailleurs (with batteries)... I just prefer mechanical still for most applications except tt bikes, and any bike where the cable routing compromises a mechanical setup.
:beerchug:


Unfortunately Etap would not eliminate the rattle from the brake cable, which is the one I've had the biggest issue with. It can really clatter...

pdlpsher1
Posts: 1599
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:09 pm
Location: CO

by pdlpsher1

Thanks da123. I carry two spare tubes, one CO2 cartridge, some patches, and a pump. Finding a place for these items is hard on an aero bike! I use a camelback so no bottle cages on my bike. I wish I could hide the pump somewhere so it doesn't affect the aerodynamics of the bike. I don't want to carry tools/pump in my camelback. I have seen the aero bento boxes that are used on tri bikes. The fabric ones are cheesy and the nice ones (made of carbon) are one-offs custom units. Plus to install them I'd have to install two riv-nuts on the top tube of my new ride.

I agree that an aero bike is helpful for any size of rider. I actually do believe the smaller/ligher you are the more benefit you'll gain :D

CanadianBiker
Posts: 98
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2015 2:34 pm

by CanadianBiker

DA123, I have to thank you for your amazing feedback today, after reading your review I pulled the trigger and ordered a 58 H2. I talked to the store about the rattling and they did tell me it was an issue on 2 of the bikes they've sold but they've figured out how to resolved it and showed me a floor model they had, here is hoping it's true if not I'll be visiting them soon.

@Calnago as for the size comment on the Etap, I agree it's a bit odd looking but I've spoken to a few friends that ride it and they swear by it, they are converts from Mechanical or UDI2 and would not ride anything else then Etap right now. I will take their word and give you guys feedback when I get the bike, unfortunately I have 22 days to wait before it's delivered... Something tells me it's going to be a long 22 days.

pdlpsher1
Posts: 1599
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Location: CO

by pdlpsher1

Congrats. I hope those 22 days aren't business days :-)


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by Weenie


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