Schmolke seat post

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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BugsBunny7788
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Jul 10, 2015 6:48 am

by BugsBunny7788

Hi there

Does any one have experience with Schmolke SL or TLO seat posts?

Are they comfy?

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synthesis
Posts: 133
Joined: Wed Nov 20, 2013 9:17 pm
Location: Denmark

by synthesis

I use the TLO (27.2) in combination with a MCFK saddle, very comfy, in comparison with TLO/Arione K:1

by Weenie


biki
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2016 9:37 am
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada

by biki

I too having been wondering about the Schmolke TLO post. I am coming from a Syntace P6 HiFlex, weighing 231g. I chose it for its advertised flex property, but I think I could achieve the same comfort by choosing a very light post with probably inherent flex. Has anyone used both posts, and can you comment specifically on comparative comfort?

da123
Posts: 169
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:42 am

by da123

biki wrote:I too having been wondering about the Schmolke TLO post. I am coming from a Syntace P6 HiFlex, weighing 231g. I chose it for its advertised flex property, but I think I could achieve the same comfort by choosing a very light post with probably inherent flex. Has anyone used both posts, and can you comment specifically on comparative comfort?


Not used the Syntace post, but I have used the TLO post in 27.2, 31.6 and layback (27.2). I can compare to Canyon VCLS (220g), Engage Revit (125g) and Ritchey carbon one bolt (160g).

The TLO post is more comfortable than any of the other posts. Much more comfortable than the Ritchey post (though to be fair, that is not marketed as a comfort post). Noticeably (but not massively) more comfortable than the Canyon and Engage posts. I think there are some testing results available on line that back this up in terms of the flex. I've not had any durability issues. The 31.6 post I've owned for 4 years and it has probably done over 10,000 miles.

I wouldn't recommend the lay-back post however. Because of the design I had real issues trying to tighten the bolts to the required torque. Despite a lot of back and forth with Schmolke, they couldn't recommend an installation method that I could get to work, so they swapped it for another in-line post. I would go for an AX Lightness if you want lay-back.

liketoride
Posts: 302
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2012 3:05 am

by liketoride

mine too have also passed all tests and i am well over the 90kg mark

2old4this
Posts: 360
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:26 am

by 2old4this

I've had both road and mountain 27.2 and 31.6. TLOs are indeed very comfortable and light (mtb version is ~9 gr heavier, with an extra layer of carbon.) I compare the comfort level to Storck's comfort seatpost. AX has a very light seatpost as well but I don't think it absorbs as much vibration as TLOs (besides there were a few cracked cases of ax seatpost...)

Couple of points about TLOs
1- You have to buy the right size since the insertion depth is limited. But truthfully how much do you change your seatpost length?
2- Zero seat back. Yes, there is a 10 mm version but even I find it a little too fragile looking. That limits your geometry to a certain limit.

All in all, I prefer mtb version because of the added strength...

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mrgray
Posts: 794
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 1:56 am

by mrgray

i have used the tlo 31.6 mm and found it to be far superior to the colnago standard post. i have a 10 mm offset on the way for my new (old) parlee and am horrified by what i have read here.
Bobo S&S Steel Bike - 7.5 kg
Oltre XR2- 6.6 kg
Look 585 - 6.8 kg
Look 695 SR :D

da123
Posts: 169
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:42 am

by da123

mrgray wrote:i have used the tlo 31.6 mm and found it to be far superior to the colnago standard post. i have a 10 mm offset on the way for my new (old) parlee and am horrified by what i have read here.


Perhaps you'll have more luck than me. If it helps, I've copied below the instruction from Schmolke on installation, and then my response. I ruined the first post I had, basically because in using the method I describe in my response below, I ended up inadvertently putting much more than 2.5nm in the rear bolt. This deformed the carbon round the layback bar. They did then replace this under warranty, however as I could never obtain instructions I was comfortable with (or which worked for me) from them, I never even rode the replacement post, just sent it back and exchanged for an inline post.

Schmolke :

"We do not have a special instruction manual for the setback seatpost. The tightening strength is the same like for standard MTB seatpost.
With the front screw you only fix the saddle angle and then tight the back screw with max of 4NM."

My response :

"The problem I found with setting the saddle angle with the front screw, and then tightening the rear, is that in tightening the rear bolt, the saddle angle then changes as the back of the saddle is pulled downwards as the half pipe rotates on the seapost shaft. This isn’t an issue with an in-line post, as you can carefully tighten the front and the rear alternately, maintaining the same angle until the correct torque has been reached on both bolts. How is it possible to stop the saddle moving backwards once the angle has been set by the front screw? The only way I could get the angle right with what I thought was the correct torque setting was by tightening the front screw such that the saddle was pitched forward, and then tightening the rear to bring the saddle level and hit an appropriate (2.5nm) torque setting. This was obviously trial and error, as I had to experiment with how far to pitch the saddle forward with the front screw to get an appropriate torque"

They did then suggest a method which involved installing the post off the bike, inverting the post and resting the saddle on a flat surface to stop the saddle pitching backwards as you tightened the rear bolt, but I couldn't get this to work.

BugsBunny7788
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Jul 10, 2015 6:48 am

by BugsBunny7788

I was looking at the Schmolke SL/TLO seatposts a while back.

I found a website which tested various seatposts (in German if I remember correctly) that showed it to be the *most* compliant by a long shot. I recall also the SL version what not far behind in the comfort testing. It also tested the Canyon VCLS post which I have.

What I think is important (especially if you are relatively new to cycling) is that you are absolutely sure you get your bike fit right before you buy. Until I got a professional bike fit done, I thought I was riding at the right seat height. If I had bought the Schmolke then I would have very likely got the wrong length as - after my bike fit, the fitter suggested quite a big drop in seat height.

For those who don't know, the Schmolke seatposts are each designed for a certain seat height. You have a limited range to adjust them - as the carbon layering is thicker/thinner along the length of the shaft.

exctasy
Posts: 82
Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2015 4:34 am

by exctasy

I'm interested in a seatpost form schmolke myself..found the results of the test

http://www.schmolke-carbon.com/carbon/c ... imiert.pdf

Fiery
Posts: 420
Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2013 9:21 am

by Fiery

da123 wrote:The problem I found with setting the saddle angle with the front screw, and then tightening the rear, is that in tightening the rear bolt, the saddle angle then changes as the back of the saddle is pulled downwards as the half pipe rotates on the seapost shaft. This isn’t an issue with an in-line post, as you can carefully tighten the front and the rear alternately, maintaining the same angle until the correct torque has been reached on both bolts. How is it possible to stop the saddle moving backwards once the angle has been set by the front screw? The only way I could get the angle right with what I thought was the correct torque setting was by tightening the front screw such that the saddle was pitched forward, and then tightening the rear to bring the saddle level and hit an appropriate (2.5nm) torque setting. This was obviously trial and error, as I had to experiment with how far to pitch the saddle forward with the front screw to get an appropriate torque.

This is how all seatposts with a front thumb screw work (Fizik posts for example). It's not as straightforward as a standard two bolt post but it's jist as precise and secure once you know what you're doing.

The process is iterative. First you set the front bolt approximately and tighten the rear to the appropriate torque. Then note the angle and see which way you need to go to get the appropriate tilt. Now loosen the reat bolt and then tighten or loosen the front, depending on how the saddle was when all was torqued up. Don't worry about the angle of the saddle when the rear bolt is loose, check it only when it's tightened to the correct torque. After one or two iterations you'll get a feel for how much turning the front bolt affects the final angle of the saddle. Once you have your base position set it's even easier, as you will just be moving the bolt in tiny amounts, a quarter turn or so. Again, the key is not to look at the angle when the clamp is loose but to think in terms of "This much rotation on the front bolt will mean this much angle change once the rear is tightened to the correct torque."

by Weenie


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