Help me to make a pedal choice

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
kode54
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Joined: Tue May 23, 2006 9:39 pm

by kode54

Speedplay is now selling the Pave. wasn't there some patent issues between the two companies at one point?
- AX Lightness Vial EVO D + DA9150 + Enve SES 4.5 carbon hubs
- Parlee Altum + DA9150 + Enve SES 4.5 carbon hubs
- Parlee ESX + DA9150 + THM SRM PM + Enve SES 6.7 CK hubs
- Guru Praemio R Titanium + DA9150 + Enve 3.4 CK hubs

by Weenie


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mythical
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by mythical

That was Bebop. Coombe is a completely different pedal altogether.

There's not that much resemblance between Coombe and Speedplay, also in engagement. For example, Coombe has no moving parts and you don't have the feeling like you're trying to clip in on a ball, like I have with my Zero's. On the other hand, with Coombe's you engage and disengage in the same manner.

Coombe went out of business because sales plummeted. This was probably caused by many bike shoe companies adopting the 3-bolt Look standard in large numbers. Coombe didn't have the cleat to accommodate for this standard For example, I had Coombe cleats that bolted directly onto Sidi soles that, back then, still used adapter plates. My pedal stack height was unbelievably low and this made such a big difference in power transfer. They thought they would be back in business sooner.

This year Coombe is back and, now with 3-bolt Look compatibility, their product seems even more compliant than before. Worth a try, IMO.
“I always find it amazing that a material can actually sell a product when it’s really the engineering that creates and dictates how well that material will behave or perform.” — Chuck Teixeira

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Hawkwood
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Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2009 4:27 pm

by Hawkwood

mythical wrote:This thread is an excellent opportunity to plug Coombe Millennium II pedals. Yes, my favorite pedal maker is back in business! These pedals offer stable foot retention, excellent durability, great pedaling ergonomics and a low weight to boot. I had virtually no maintenance in the 4-5 years I rode my Pro Pedals (old version).


I ride the Time Xpressos, but have always hankered after the Coombe pedals. They look a little pricy, but very tempting all the same.

BdaGhisallo
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Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2004 1:38 pm

by BdaGhisallo

The Coombes look like they offer no fore aft adjustability - am I right?

Matey
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Joined: Wed Aug 13, 2014 4:12 pm

by Matey

I've been using 105's for the last year or so with no problems but am currently upgrading the rest of the bike to Ultegra 6870; will I notice any improvement upgrading my pedals to Ultegra or even DA?

spud
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by spud

I'm not certain about this, but the spindle on the Ultegra/DA may be shorter than on 105.

eric
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by eric

I've had something like 70k miles on various 7810 and 9000 pedals (same axle and bearings, different body material). I've had one that developed a slight amount of play and needed to be adjusted. I opened it up to check the bearings. They were fine but I cleaned and regreased them anyhow.

They're not the easiest pedals to clip into (I'd use something else if I was a crit racer) but they're one of the most reliable systems on a bike.

Matey
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Joined: Wed Aug 13, 2014 4:12 pm

by Matey

Is there any advantage to the shorter axel other than a further reduction in weight?

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dwaharvey
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Location: USA

by dwaharvey

@BdaGhisalo: Yes you're right that there is no adjustability in the cleat, but you have a choice of three hole locations when you buy the cleats. So it's a question of measuring your existing setup and determining where the pedal axle lies relative to the rear pair of bolt holes, and then ordering the cleat that duplicates it.

I must admit that I share mythical's excitement about these pedals. I've been riding Coombe pro pedals for 12 years, and have never had to do any maintenance aside from a yearly injection of grease. And I'm on only my second set of cleats! No other pedal manufacturer comes even remotely close in terms of the durability and low maintenance.

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Rick
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Joined: Sat Aug 29, 2009 4:30 pm

by Rick

On the Coombs, since it is metal-to-metal contact, is there anything that "preloads" the surfaces together ? In other words, what prevents clicking sounds as the pedal rotates under force, which could open and close small gaps.

It the rotation free or with recentering force ?

±3° isn't much float unless there is some positive stopping force to overcome before release. How does that work ?

How long to the aluminum and brass cleats wear ? Is brass significantly longer ?

thanks!

TheKaiser
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Joined: Thu Sep 05, 2013 3:29 pm

by TheKaiser

I second Rick's question regarding play in the cleat/pedal interface. That is something I have always wondered about with Coombs...is there a little for/aft slop when pulling through the bottom of the pedal stroke or extending over the top? And how does this the minimal float transition to pedal release? Is there a gradual build up of any resistance, a sudden stop before release (like on an SPD), or nothing at all to differentiate clipped in/out other than foot angle (like Speedplay Frog)?

Can you shed any light on this dwaharvey? :D

@Matey, regarding your question on spindle length, I am not sure of the exact dimensions on the SPD-SL series but, generally speaking, shorter spindles will provide you with a narrower spacing between your feet (often called "Q factor"). Many people believe this to be more ergonomic, however there are many exceptions to the rule, for example Mark Cavendish has custom extra long spindles in the Dura-Ace pedals, and Armstrong used to put spacers between his pedals and cranks to widen them, apparently to relieve some back pain he was experiencing.

5 8 5
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by 5 8 5

Matey wrote:I've been using 105's for the last year or so with no problems but am currently upgrading the rest of the bike to Ultegra 6870; will I notice any improvement upgrading my pedals to Ultegra or even DA?

Like you I've been trying 105 pedals. Upgraded to Ultegra Carbon. Biggest differences apart from weight are the default release tension on the Ultegras is a lot higher and they are a little easier to clip into.
spud wrote:I'm not certain about this, but the spindle on the Ultegra/DA may be shorter than on 105.

I heard something similar so decided to measure my pedals. It turned out the centre of the body of 105 (5600) and Ultegra (6800) are exactly the same. That doesn't mean the actual pedal spindles aren't different lengths though.

Oswald
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Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2004 10:11 pm

by Oswald

I just ordered a set of PD-9000 pedals. Mainly because the colour matches my current groupset and bike better then my old PD-7750 pedals :oops: I'm a bit disappointed that after over 10 years of use my old PD-7750 pedals show hardly any sign of wear... So that makes it very hard for me to justify my new purchase to the wife. That means I will need to buy her something even more expensive :mrgreen:

Oswald
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Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2004 10:11 pm

by Oswald

Just weighed the PD-9000 pedals and they came in at 248 grams :D

2old4this
Posts: 344
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:26 am

by 2old4this

I've got my first shimano pedals a few years back. They've now replaced pedals on all my bikes. They really are install and forget...
I bought a da9000 last weekend. Not that I needed them. The LBS had a big sale going on. So I ended up payin $150. Put them on the tt I built this year. They are butter smooth. So they went to another bike in the fleet. TT has an ultegra now. :-)

by Weenie


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