Can I put a Quarq power meter on my bike

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
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jspaceman
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Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2012 11:25 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada
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by jspaceman

I'm thinking of getting a power meter for my 2004 Trek 5200. The Trek currently has a Dura-Ace Octalink bottom bracket and Ultegra 6500 double crank.

One of the power meters I'm considering is the Quarq. Would it be possible to install a Quarq on my bike if I were to put in a new bottom bracket? For example, if I removed the Octalink BB and installed a GXP, could I then install a Quarq? Would there be other issues with the rest of my Shimano-centric drivetrain (eg. front derailleur)?

Or should I just skip the headaches and get a wheelset built around a Powertap hub?

Thanks.

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euan
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by euan

You will need to replace the Octalink BB with a GXP BB like you say. Quarqs come with 10sp chainrings and 6500 is 9sp so to have to swap over your chainrings (if they are the same BCD) otherwise you might not have optimal shifting or noise issues. If you are staying with the 10sp chainring you might need to adjust the front derailleur to get better shifting.

I have to say though, if you weren't able to research this yourself and you aren't going to be coached or have someone do training plans for you(not just finding one and copying it) that training with power might not be for you.

I'm assuming you want to train with power not just see what your power is while you ride. In which case a Quarq is a bit of a waste. Get a Stages or a cheaper Powertap.
"Step forward the climber and all those who worship at the altar of lightness" - R. Millar

by Weenie


silvercivic27
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by silvercivic27

If you want a Quarq, get a Quarq. Don't listen to anyone who implies you aren't "good enough" for it. It's your money, spend it as you like. It should fit and work. I bought my father a 5700 105 crank this Christmas and he got it on his 9sp ultegra equipped bike, and it works just fine. In other words, a Quarq should work fine with significant adjustment. Go for it.

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euan
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by euan

Read what I said. I didn't imply he wasn't good enough.
"Step forward the climber and all those who worship at the altar of lightness" - R. Millar

jspaceman
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by jspaceman

I don't have a coach, but I read Joe Friel's power meter book and I'm currently reading Coogan & Hunter's book. And using Trainer Road's virtual power feature has piqued my interest in getting a power meter to train with.

If I got a Quarq compact crank would I also need to adjust the front dérailleur? My bike currently has a standard crank.

silvercivic27
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by silvercivic27

Trainerroad is a "gateway drug" for a lot of people. You would have to do a lot of front derailleur adjustment if you make that many changes. You will also have to shorten your chain, etc., etc., etc. I didn't mention that it took my father literally all day to get it to work, but he did get it to work, and he claims it shifts and functions flawlessly. Clearly, the easiest way or you to get power if you don't care about using multiple wheelsets would be to go the powertap route.

by Weenie


eric
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by eric

It's not difficult to reposition a front derailleur and get it adjusted correctly. Shimano has excellent instructions on their tech docs web site (http://techdocs.shimano.com/techdocs/index.jsp).
You may need to look at some newer components and extrapolate.

The regular GXP BB is excellent, and GXP is the easiest BB and crank to install. No need to set preload or fuss with spacers. You will need the Octalink BB tool and a GXP BB tool. And of course a torque wrench.

The 10sp rings will most likely work fine on your 9sp bike. But if they don't you can get chainring spacers to increase the space between the rings. QBP sells them which means that any shop can get them. They come as small as 0.6mm.

You may need a shorter chain. But chains are a wear item and yours is statistically at least half worn already. Adjust the chain length so it will go over the big ring and big cog. You should not use that combo but you might shift into it by accident. 9sp Shimano rear derailleurs should handle up to a 28t cog even though the max rated is 27t. And they should have enough wrap for a 50/34 and 12-27 cassette even though that is a bit over spec as well. The chain might be a little loose in the small ring/small cog combo but you shouldn't use that either, and usually the chain rubs on the 50t ring in the smallest couple cogs anyhow, making them unuseable unless you have no mechanical sympathy.

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