Silicon spray in cable housing, why not?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
Post Reply
User avatar
DMF
Posts: 1062
Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2008 10:14 am
Location: Sweden

by DMF

So I've been thinking, and searching, why would one not want to spray a dash of silicon lubricant in gear and brake cable housing. I'm thinking the friction reduction will be noticeable. Yet my online searches reveal very little of these kind of attempts (none actually), so I'm thinking maybe there is a good reason not to?

I.e build up of silicon that will clogg the housing or whatever?

Has anyone got a reason not to do it?

aerozy
Posts: 778
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:48 am
Location: Mountains, Portugal

by aerozy

I've tried to spray silicon spray in cables and while they greatly reduce friction in the short term, over time the lubricant thickens (just like on your chain) and friction increases exponentially. This process is quicker if you ride in harsh wet conditions.

Guess that's why coated teflon cables work and liquid sprayed teflon lubrificants do not.

PS: Ive tried this with inner liner type systems and standard cable systems
Sunny cycling holidays in Portugal @ Cherry Cottage Vintage B&B

User avatar
DMF
Posts: 1062
Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2008 10:14 am
Location: Sweden

by DMF

Ahh thanks, I was very much afraid that might be the reason. Glad to know for sure, before I sacrifice a new cable set :)

CrimsonKarter21
Posts: 114
Joined: Fri Oct 29, 2010 11:30 pm

by CrimsonKarter21

Lubricating your cables is really a necessity. The trick is finding a lubricant for it. Rock'n'Roll lubes makes a product called Cable Magic that does the trick, but like most of their products, it's expensive.
Finding the proper carrier for the lube is the most important thing. My old boss had been using a mixture of TriFlow, WD40 and mineral spirits on all customer bikes for about 10 years without problem. Just like chainlube, I had to reapply some every now and then, especially after wet rides or washes, but it significantly improved my shifting performance and brake feel.

User avatar
DMF
Posts: 1062
Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2008 10:14 am
Location: Sweden

by DMF

I actually don't use liquid lube on PTFE coated cables, but do use some dry chain lube on regular non-coated stainless cables. Which I in turn for the most of it don't use on the main bikes.

The idea of silicon spray was to get a non-liquid coating inside the cable housing, primarily for use with PTFE coated cables...

I find that lubed cables draw in a bit of grit in the cables unless you have sealed ferrules, but those in turn add A LOT of drag vs non-sealed ferrules.

But that's just me, I know a lot of other people who swear by different setups.

CrimsonKarter21
Posts: 114
Joined: Fri Oct 29, 2010 11:30 pm

by CrimsonKarter21

I find that very little grit gets into the cables, and the stuff that does comes out with a wet ride or washing.
But like you said, different strokes for different folks.

socratease
Posts: 169
Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2011 5:25 pm

by socratease

You can try shimano special grease. It's a silicon impregnated grease that doesn't tend to gum up over time. On cabling installs, I run a very thin coat of grease along the cable, and put a dab between ferrule and housing. Lube with tri-flow per taste.

This makes the most noticeable difference on "coarser" cables, i.e. brake cables, campy cables, and to some degree, shimano sis cables.

User avatar
DMF
Posts: 1062
Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2008 10:14 am
Location: Sweden

by DMF

I wasn't actually aware Shimano sold the SP41 grease in bulk, but I will give that a try on the Jagwire teflon coated cables next time. I like the idea of having non-sealed ferrules with some grease in them too, would have to be the right grease though and this seems to hit the spot. Will also apply a light coat on the cable.

Not that I've been unsatisfied with my dry, unsealed setups (on Jagwire housing and cables atleast), but this is weenies so there is always room for incremental improvements, right? :)

Thanks for the Shimano Special Grease tip, will put it to use.

User avatar
bikerjulio
Posts: 1901
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2009 10:38 pm
Location: Welland, Ontario

by bikerjulio

I'm not normally this pedantic, but....... it's Silicone

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicon

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicone
There's sometimes a buggy.
How many drivers does a buggy have?

One.

So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

User avatar
DMF
Posts: 1062
Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2008 10:14 am
Location: Sweden

by DMF

Sorry, English is not my native language, in Swedish silicone translates to 'silikon'. I hope it hasn't completely ruined your day.

User avatar
bikerjulio
Posts: 1901
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2009 10:38 pm
Location: Welland, Ontario

by bikerjulio

No need to apologise. Your English is much better than my Swedish :)

Even among English speakers, it's a common mistake.

No one else had picked it up, so I did.
There's sometimes a buggy.
How many drivers does a buggy have?

One.

So let's just say I'm drivin' this buggy...
and if you fix your attitude you can ride along with me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GekiIMh4ZkM

User avatar
sugarkane
in the industry
Posts: 1800
Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2011 11:14 am
Location: SYD
Contact:

by sugarkane

Get some dlc cables.. Clean them every now and then ;)

jockalldrick
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon May 14, 2012 11:49 pm

by jockalldrick

I've always done this
and until now never seen the downside...

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post