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Re: Success when switching to a more aero position on the bi

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2013 2:18 am
by Don
Whether you decide to stretch or not, the decision is personal. Some people in forums do not see the merit of stretching.

A very good explanation of stretching, the reasons for it, and the exercises that apply to cyclists is found in the Yoga for Cyclists series at http://road.cc/cycling-health-and-fitness. Earlier episodes of the series can be found by searching the site. The series is structured so that particular areas can be targeted.

The argument in this series is that as cyclists our movements on the bike are such that we don't use a full range of motion; consequently, over time we are likely to incur some deficiency or muscular imbalance.

Re: Success when switching to a more aero position on the bi

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2013 3:28 am
by Kayrehn
Am I right to say that if the stem goes down, the saddle should tilt slightly downwards to keep the hip angles from narrowing too much?

Re: Success when switching to a more aero position on the bi

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2013 3:28 am
by Weenie

Re: Success when switching to a more aero position on the bi

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:02 am
by tommasini
Don wrote:Whether you decide to stretch or not, the decision is personal. Some people in forums do not see the merit of stretching.

A very good explanation of stretching, the reasons for it, and the exercises that apply to cyclists is found in the Yoga for Cyclists series at http://road.cc/cycling-health-and-fitness" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;. Earlier episodes of the series can be found by searching the site. The series is structured so that particular areas can be targeted.

The argument in this series is that as cyclists our movements on the bike are such that we don't use a full range of motion; consequently, over time we are likely to incur some deficiency or muscular imbalance.


It's one thing to be flexible (ho rah) - it's another to be able to put power to the pedals in a lowered aero position...to engage muscles that are adapted to powering in that posture. Stretching is great for some things but you've got to work with intensity in the intended lowered posture to build not only the ability to go low but more importantly the ability to power the pedals in that posture.

Re: Success when switching to a more aero position on the bi

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2013 3:39 pm
by eric
Kayrehn wrote:Am I right to say that if the stem goes down, the saddle should tilt slightly downwards to keep the hip angles from narrowing too much?


Tiltling the saddle down doesn't change your position (but it does require you to push back with your arms to stay in position). Moving the saddle forwards does change your position.

If you look at pro bikes you'll see that none of them have the saddle tilted down.

Re: Success when switching to a more aero position on the bi

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2013 7:08 pm
by 11.4
Kayrehn wrote:Am I right to say that if the stem goes down, the saddle should tilt slightly downwards to keep the hip angles from narrowing too much?


No. Your hips shouldn't change in relation to your legs and pedals. Your torso simply gets lower. The rotation isn't at the hips themselves (other than getting into the right position in the first place). You'll likely have more saddle problems with it tilted lower and you'll definitely have balance/stability problems plus make your shoulders less comfortable and less efficient.