The TriRig Mercury Pedal - just 71 grams per pair.

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
fdegrove
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by fdegrove

Hi,

Having said that, 10,000+ miles on my Time RXS and they are still smooth


So are mine but you'll be hard pushed to find a needle bearing in there though.... :P

I wonder what these nylon bushing pedals will feel like after a few thousand miles.


I don't think we'll have to wait that long to actually hear them.

Still, for a tri or tt, why not?

Ciao, ;)
Being a snob is an expensive hobby.

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AGW
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by AGW

BmanX wrote:
AGW wrote:and now these cost so damn much?


I am sorry but where did you see pricing on these. Did I miss something. Do you have some inside information as to the cost of these pedals since the pricing has not been released yet.


My apologies... I don't know what I was thinking when I wrote that last night. The price quoted by F45 is what I read as the price for these pedals. Given the quote, I hope I can eat crow and we can all enjoy a cheaper alternative to aero/ultralites.

wally318
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by wally318

All the people that seem to come down hard on the aerolite style padals that have no float, I wonder
what would have become of them back in the good ole days?

Remember when there was 6 spds, Down tube shifters(no clicks)
no dual pivot brakes and there was NO Such Thing as a pedal with float.

Guess they probably would give up cycling and go fishing?
AEROLITUS-defender of the faith

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HammerTime2
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by HammerTime2

wally318,

In many cases, yes. I suspect (but don't know) that float has enabled some riders to keep cycling to a much later age than they would have without float. Also note that the traditional slotted cleats/toeclips generally had some slop, which essentially provides a little float, as opposed to the no float of no float clipless pedals.

RussellS
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by RussellS

wally318 wrote: Remember when there was 6 spds, Down tube shifters(no clicks)
no dual pivot brakes and there was NO Such Thing as a pedal with float.


Another person who does not know what they are talking about. People who actually used toeclips and straps with cleats know there was float. The cleat had about 1/8" slot. The pedal cage was about 1/16" wide. You had plenty of float to allow your foot to wiggle back and forth.

6 speeds? Sh-t. My first bike had a 5 speed freewheel.

eric
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by eric

With clips and straps you could also rock your foot laterally, depending on how tight your straps were. I see a lot of riders now who ride bow-legged or with knees that don't track straight up and down. Old style cleats and straps would actually be better for that than most modern clipless pedals.

I'm blessed to have reasonably symmetrical limbs and have worked a lot on my pedalling form so I have no need for float. I would not discount the Tririg pedals for that. But no bearings? That doesn't sound like a good idea.

loco2546
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by loco2546

:shock:

fdegrove
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by fdegrove

Hi,

But no bearings? That doesn't sound like a good idea.


Just when I was thinking that they could do just the same without that full length sleeve...... :lol:

Ciao, ;)
Being a snob is an expensive hobby.

wally318
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by wally318

The aerolite pedals have no metal bearings in them. They use a turcite bushing/bearing.
Turcite is a delrin based plastic composite that has a solid lubricant in the mix. It is an
industry proven material. I'm not sure if the Tririg and the other one are using that or some
other bushing material such as UHMF.

Most pedal cages were betweem .078" to .093" thick. I've never seen cleat slots that were
.125" wide. But they may have been a few to.010" wider than the cage. So I'll give you a degree or
2 of latitude on the float thing there. That's not to say that any didn't widen out to 1/8"
with wear or improper cleat set up causing unnatural wear points on the cleats.

I still train on quill pedals and only use aerolite pedals on my light bikes. I've probably spent more money
on making special custom quill pedals and aluminum cleats for them, than you would beleive if I told you.
AEROLITUS-defender of the faith

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TriRig
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by TriRig

Thanks for all the interest. I knew there would be a wide variety of concerns about whether the pedals will be right for a particular user -- i.e., fore/aft adjustment range, no-float riding, cost, etc. That's why we're giving you six months to play with them. If they don't work out for you, you can return them. Simple as that. I could prattle on all day trying to debate the merits of any particular concern, but I think it's easier if you just ride the pedals. A couple notes:

  • The left and right cleats are identical. Swapping them won't change the adjustment range.
  • No, there won't be any more fore/aft adjustment than what is shown. It's about 4mm less than a traditional cleat, so if you desperately need 8mm of setback to survive, then Mercury isn't your pedal.
  • Regarding bearing efficiency, bearing life, cleat life, etc, the proof will be in the riding. You get six months to evaluate -- that should be more than enough time to figure out if they're durable and efficient enough for you.
  • Titanium pedals are expensive because of the difficulty in manufacturing it. Some manufacturers can produce relatively inexpensive ti spindles because they are making LOTS of them. But for a small manufacturer like Ultralite, or TriRig, machining costs are very high. Tooling costs are high. Material costs are high. Yes, we're aiming to be less expensive than Ultralite. But I don't know the production costs of Mercury yet, so it'll be a while before final pricing gets published. But if it's too expensive for you, don't buy it.
  • For those of you so ready to dismiss fixed pedals, have a look at the pro peloton. These guys ride six hours a day, and the vast majority of them are on no-float pedals. Seems to work out OK for them, and you definitely don't hear of knee epidemics among former pros. It's our philosophy (and the philosophy of many good fitters) that MOST riders can get along great with fixed pedals, if they take the time to dial in their cleat position and Q-factor. It's all about getting the knee to track well. Again, this is why we give you six months' return policy. That should give you plenty of time to dial them in.
  • Yes, the retention mechanism is identical to Aerolite. And the design, by virtue of its simplicity, is necessarily similar. But a 100% copy? That's a bit of a stretch. There's a lot going on here that's new and unique. If you don't have the time to read the article and figure out what it is, maybe don't make sweeping false statements.

dereksmalls
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by dereksmalls

Zenkai wrote:
  • Titanium pedals are expensive because of the difficulty in manufacturing it. Some manufacturers can produce relatively inexpensive ti spindles because they are making LOTS of them. But for a small manufacturer like Ultralite, or TriRig, machining costs are very high. Tooling costs are high. Material costs are high. Yes, we're aiming to be less expensive than Ultralite. But I don't know the production costs of Mercury yet, so it'll be a while before final pricing gets published. But if it's too expensive for you, don't buy it.


Could you not get someone like Ward Industries to manufacture them for you? I don't know how many after market spindles they make but, hey, if I can buy a single set off them for $65US it can't cost that much to get them made in bulk would it?

hasbeen
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by hasbeen

I am impressed and glad to see these headed to production. I hope to get my hands on a pair at some point. I have used Aerolites for about 10 years and close to 100,000 miles. They may be finicky but they are worth it to me. They have a few degrees of float especially after riding them for a bit. But this isnt about the Aerolite. I will be keeping an eye on these. I am always looking for back up ideas or improvements on what Ive got. There are two things that have defined all my bikes over the years, a Flite Evolution saddle and aerolite pedals. Still searching for something better. I really like the adjustable width and would think a simple reverse of the cleat would get the desired set-back (I run the cleats pretty far back and custom drill my shoes so not a big deal either way). I am a bit concerned in the long term reliability of the nylon though.
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btompkins0112 wrote:
It has the H2 geo......one step racier than a hybrid bike

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WMW
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by WMW

hasbeen wrote:I am a bit concerned in the long term reliability of the nylon though.


Sounds like they are counting on that part being disposable... sort of like cleats... and hopefully cheap.
formerly rruff...

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TriRig
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by TriRig

Not sure I like the word "disposable" so much, but indeed, we will have replacements available for worn out cleats AND bearings. And they'll be as cheap as we can make them available.

BmanX
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by BmanX

I for one will be first in line to pick up a pair of these. Can't wait.
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