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Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 1:19 pm
by Valbrona
I am going to buy a 3/8" torque wrench for higher torque applications in the 30-50Nm range, ie. BB cups and cassette lockring.

Is a digital torque wrench worth the money? Any helpful comments appreciated.

Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 1:19 pm
by Weenie

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 1:54 pm
by SpinnerTim
I guess it never hurts to have a more accurate read on torque specs, but for the components and torque values you're describing, I don't feel that a digital indicator is necessary. I've been using Park's torque wrenches for the application you specify, and there have been no problems in terms of component life or performance. Also, a more sophisticated gauge may not guarantee a better-calibrated, more accurate tool, just higher resolution of whatever value the gauge things the wrench is applying.

For really low values (e.g., Schmolke and Ax stuff with alloy/ti hardware, carbon bolts, nylon threads), I'd say get the most accurate tools available. The really low values tend to demand torque wrenches with smaller drive studs than the big iron used on BB's and the like.

-Tim

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 1:58 pm
by Butcher
The best thing about a digital torque wrench is the angle torque capability [only the better one's have this]. Since bike do not use that type of torque measurement, I would think it would be a waste of money.

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 2:43 pm
by bm0p700f
Park dod the little lciker and the big cliocker torque wrenchs. They seem fine.

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 3:16 pm
by sungod
as above, wouldn't bother with digital readout

i use a sealey stw1011 for the big stuff, comes with a good storage box and calibration certificate...

http://www.toolbox.co.uk/sealey-stw1011 ... 526-106502

...just under 33 quid including delivery

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 3:23 pm
by michel2
a digital torque wrench isnt more accurate. read the literature, torque wrenches need to be calibrated, most of the snap on tools are calibrated with in 4 precent, norbar wrenches seem to be calibrated with in 2 percent...has nothing to do with the method in which you read the wrench...

i would go with norbar, they are affordable accurate and very durable, i belive the syntace wrenches are made by them aswell.
cheers

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 4:02 pm
by thisisatest
Digital torque wrenches are not necessarily more accurate-correct. But not having to wind them back down (or suffer the consequences over the long term), the ability to use them on left-hand threads, and the generally wider range, are pretty compelling arguments. I also like that, regardless of what the tone is set to, you see the last max torque read on the screen.

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 4:15 pm
by 1415chris
I can understand for small alu bolts or carbon parts but do you really need torque wrench for cassette and BB cups?

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 4:20 pm
by Spindoctor
I have a torque wrench, never use it. Always feels like tightening to within an inch of its life and way beyond what is necessary.

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 5:40 pm
by bm0p700f
However all parts I torque to manufacturers specs have never failed.

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 6:12 pm
by Vagabond
Spindoctor wrote:I have a torque wrench, never use it. Always feels like tightening to within an inch of its life and way beyond what is necessary.


I understand where you're coming from. I'm very careful with my components and I find that using my torque wrench/torque keys to affix the stem plate always "prints" the heck out of whatever carbon bars I'm attaching if I use 5 n m. Still, I won't touch any of my carbon stuff without one. On a related note, how often do you folks get your wrenches recalibrated if at all?

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 6:55 pm
by fdegrove
Hi,

i would go with norbar, they are affordable accurate and very durable, i belive the syntace wrenches are made by them aswell.


IIRC those are made by Wuerth.
Anyhow, as others said, digital readout capability is not necessary at all.
If you need to wrench carbon/carbon parts or carbon/metal use some carbon mounting paste. That way you do not need to be close to manufacturers allowed torque (-30%) and you do not stress parts as much.

Small screws (aluminium/ti mostly), BB cups and the like do benefit from more accurate torquing so that's where you'd want to use a torque wrench.

Ciao, ;)

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 8:49 pm
by sedluk
You guys can risk your life however you want. This is the wrench that I use: CDI Torque 1002CF3

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 8:58 pm
by 1415chris
I can only imagine your bike, if you use such tools :wink:

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 8:58 pm
by Weenie

Re: Torque Wrenches

Posted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 9:14 pm
by timzcat
Beam style torque wrenches are more accurate in use then click type torque wrenches. They also happen to often be quite a bit cheaper.
Click type wrenches are prone to over torque because you can easily continue tightening after click whereas beam type you are more accurately using the tool.