Titanium longevity

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
maxxevv
Posts: 1952
Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2005 4:51 am

by maxxevv

Tinea Pedis wrote:
One last thing, how many carbon fibre frames could a F16 aviation mechanic fix for 2 slabs of beer? :wink: when something does go wrong with Ti, the fix tends to be a hell of a lot cheaper.


You would be asking a Dreamliner mechanic to do a carbon fiber fix instead. Or maybe for that matter a B2 or F22 mechanic/technician who deals with the carbon fibres structures on those planes ... :beerchug:

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Wingnut
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Joined: Sat Jun 23, 2007 12:41 am

by Wingnut

cloudnine wrote:I've even heard such stupid comments like "Don't ride your carbon bike in the rain!" I could never get a legitimate reason from them as to why I shouldn't ride my bike in the rain.


Might be due to the older issues of galvanic corrosion with carbon frames...I think also back in the late 80's & early 90's Ti was the wonder metal, being slightly overbuilt at that stage and only several major builders such as Merlin & Litespeed. Carbon frames were still having problems back then but Ti was "the" material...

Not invincible but I'd choose a Ti frame over a carbon any day...
"It's not the destination...it's the ride!"

by Weenie


cloudnine
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 7:04 pm

by cloudnine

Tinea Pedis wrote:But your bike had a crack, not corrosion?

The chaps point about the way in which carbon fibre bikes tend to fail is also relevant and true (when compared to how an alloy frame fails).


As for the marketing from Seven, do they offer a lifetime warranty on their frames? If so I guess it would mean you will have it for life :lol: if not, then that screen capture makes for some handy evidence for owners out there.


One last thing, how many carbon fibre frames could a F16 aviation mechanic fix for 2 slabs of beer? :wink: when something does go wrong with Ti, the fix tends to be a hell of a lot cheaper.


The way the chap made it sound was like I was riding a time bomb and yes, to be fair carbon does fail quite spectacularly fortunately I haven't had to be the one to experience it yet.

I've heard only good things about Seven, Moots and other reputable builders but there are some other companies out there that I have heard horror stories about. Obviously I can't say anything about the others as I've only had one Ti bike.

Unfortunately we don't have any carbon aircraft here in the Thai air force. :P :beerchug: Our planes are rather rundown and corruption with the top brass prevents any regular scheduled maintenance to be done. If it ain't broke yet, they aren't gonna fix it. :lol: I have hitched a ride on an L39 Albatros that was scheduled for maintenance at another airbase and I can confidently say I will take the bus next time.


Wingnut wrote:
cloudnine wrote:I've even heard such stupid comments like "Don't ride your carbon bike in the rain!" I could never get a legitimate reason from them as to why I shouldn't ride my bike in the rain.


Might be due to the older issues of galvanic corrosion with carbon frames...I think also back in the late 80's & early 90's Ti was the wonder metal, being slightly overbuilt at that stage and only several major builders such as Merlin & Litespeed. Carbon frames were still having problems back then but Ti was "the" material...

Not invincible but I'd choose a Ti frame over a carbon any day...


I would believe so, my frame was built in the early 90's. I haven't had a chance to acquire another Ti frame yet, but I do miss the feeling of a Ti bike, I also loved not having to worry about paint issues too! :thumbup:

Franklin
Posts: 400
Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 11:09 am

by Franklin

Tinea Pedis wrote:The chaps point about the way in which carbon fibre bikes tend to fail is also relevant and true (when compared to how an alloy frame fails).


Meh, it looks spectacular, but I have only seen one spectacular CF fail unrelated to a crash, the movie of the guy who sheared of his drivetrain triangle of his specialized.

Every other damage I have seen is crash related. I'm sure there are more cases of bikes disintegrating during cycling, but it's so rare that a movie like that causes a huge uproar.

Otoh, I have seen two alu steerers shear of due to bad installation during my own races. And everyone remembers Hincapie's crash (also Alu that failed).

I think the perceived risks are actually out of proportion.

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Juanmoretime
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by Juanmoretime

I road a Litespeed Vortex from 1997 to 2006 with well over 50,000 miles on it and its still going strong under a different rider. My current Lynskey R320 is at the 30,000 mile mark. I don't ride titanium for longevity but rather for the quality of the ride. I have owned carbon bikes by find titanium gives me the type of ride that I love.

Ride what you like and be happy, I am. :thumbup:
RESIDENT GRUMPY OLD MAN.

artray
Posts: 1365
Joined: Fri Oct 07, 2011 2:08 pm

by artray

Galvanic corrosion only happens to a carbon bike with alloy contact points. You should be more concerned if you ride near the coast . Rain is not so bad. If you use ti or carbon you should be fine . I had this happen to my carbon trek.

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