King or Tune?

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.
milroy
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by milroy

Building a set of wheels with ENVE 3.4 and used as every day wheels. Understand that King are considered bullet proof but I'm light on gear and the weight saving would be nice.

Yes, I have read reviews include the FWB review. Looking for real world evidence to tip me one way or the other.


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by Weenie


520 Dan
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by 520 Dan

where do you live?

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Zen Cyclery
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by Zen Cyclery

Well, it really depends on what you are looking for specifically. If you want the lightest build possible, then the Tunes are an obvious winner. However, if weight isn't so much of a priority, then the Kings would be worth a look.
If I were to pick, I would say go with the Kings. The preload adjustment is easy to use, and they seem to be pretty darn durable. The 5 year warranty would be a big factor in choosing the CKs as well.

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Timebandit415
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by Timebandit415

King, first off the R45 aren't too heavy but aren't super light anyways. Also, I say King because my friend an Ex-pro had a set of the newest Tune hubs and the bearings were shot to crap within a few months and wouldn't even spin properly.

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Juanmoretime
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by Juanmoretime

I just sold a wheelset that had Tune Mig70 and Mag190 hubs that were six years old and over 25,000 miles on them and they spun as sweet as the day I received them. I'm not sure about new coming out from Tune but I would PM Madcow or RRuff before making a decision.
RESIDENT GRUMPY OLD MAN.

konky
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by konky

For me it's a no brainer. The principle here is compatability. Enve 3.4 are medium weight and very durable rims. King R45 hubs are medium weight and very durable hubs.

I am a big fan of Tune hubs and they are quite durable considering their weight, but weight is where they excel.

Bigger Gear
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by Bigger Gear

An important consideration at this point for anyone building up a high end wheelset and running Shimano: 11 speed compatibility. If one is thinking of going to 11 speed in the next year or two, the hub consideration is important and much of the information is still forthcoming. I believe King has indicated they will have an 11 speed freehub, but it will require a different axle and change the spacing so the wheel will need re-dishing. Not sure about Tune.

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prendrefeu
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by prendrefeu

This is Weight Weenies.

That is where you'll find your answer. :smartass:
Exp001 || Other projects in the works.

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Cheers!
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by Cheers!

I'm a owner and user of both hubs.

Tune Mig190 and Mag70 laced to Reynolds DV46C. They have 5 seasons on them. I do about 5000 kms a season on my road bike. These wheels were used for all these kms and not a single issue. My aluminum freehub body is fine, not chewed up, not cracked nothing. Hubs run smooth still. I've never opened them up to do anything. They were built by Ron Ruff....

I have a 2nd pair of wheels I use as my everyday/Early season/Late season bike. It has open pro Rims with CX ray spokes. They are fitted to Chris King Classic hubs. These are from 1991. They are some of the very earliest pairs of hubs ever made by Chris King. I know this because I called them up about 2 years ago seeking some help to rebuild the hubs. They sat in my parts bin since 2002 when I moved from Rim brakes to Disc brakes. So I decided to refresh them with new guts. I went to go look at the exploded views on Chris King and they didn't match up. So I called and asked for help. They said it was from 1991 and used their old aluminum ratchet system. They since moved to Stainless gears. Since the hubs were sold old I decided to take them up on their free offer to upgrade to stainless gears.

The hubs have 10 solid years of XC MTB racing and since 2002 has seen road duty. They were raced and ridden in mud, during XC mtb use and see rain all the time as my training bike.

Both are good options. You can't go wrong. I definately like the instant engagement of the Kings when I ride Tune. I know the R45 have less engagement than the classics, but they feel just as good. Tune doesn't have that instant engagement.

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thatdkid
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by thatdkid

Tubular Or Clincher?

pierre-san
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by pierre-san

King! :thumbup:

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Cheers!
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by Cheers!

Others may disagree. But since I'm not racing on a pro race and do not have a team car following me with spare wheels and bikes I don't ride tubulars.

Gluing them are messy. Flats on the road are tricky. You either carry a very light tubular and try to peel/roll the flat one off the rim on the side of the road getting glue all over your hands and attempt to install the spare on.

Or you use the vittoria pitstop can to reinflate. Pray that the hole will seal with the goup.

My vote is go with carbon clinchers. Then run Michelin Latex long stem inner tubes and Veloflex Corsa 23 tires. Best riding combo in my opinion. Make sure to douse the inside of the tires with baby powder. Then make sure you get a paper back, put some baby powder in, put the tube in, shake it like you were making shake and bake chicken and install.

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sugarkane
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by sugarkane

Cheers! wrote:Others may disagree. But since I'm not racing on a pro race and do not have a team car following me with spare wheels and bikes I don't ride tubulars.

Gluing them are messy. Flats on the road are tricky. You either carry a very light tubular and try to peel/roll the flat one off the rim on the side of the road getting glue all over your hands and attempt to install the spare on.

Or you use the vittoria pitstop can to reinflate. Pray that the hole will seal with the goup.

My vote is go with carbon clinchers. Then run Michelin Latex long stem inner tubes and Veloflex Corsa 23 tires. Best riding combo in my opinion. Make sure to douse the inside of the tires with baby powder. Then make sure you get a paper back, put some baby powder in, put the tube in, shake it like you were making shake and bake chicken and install.



Wouldn't work for me..
I cooked a tubbie the other week braking from 80kph for a 15kph switchback hair pin on a -16% hill.
Evaporated the glue for around 50mm from the valve and deformed the tire a bit..
Had I been using carbon clinchers I'd be dead or still in traction.. Friends don't let friends ride carbon clinchers...

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Cheers!
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by Cheers!

In cases like that I think I would run aluminum rims.

by Weenie


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sugarkane
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by sugarkane

Haha I sold em.. And I got my KoM..
I had no idea that I was going to encounter such a descent...
Climbing the dam hill was pretty darn brutal!

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