Looking for suggestions for an all year road bike

Discuss light weight issues concerning road bikes & parts.

Moderator: robbosmans

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impact
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2021 7:37 pm

by impact

Hey everyone,

I'm looking for a new road bike and got quite overwhelmed. I've been riding bikes all my life but only recently started earning enough disposable income to care about specs. Nonetheless, I'm looking for a budget friendly/bang for buck (1000-1700€) bike/build that does it all. I've read and watched a lot more bike content in the last month than I previously thought existed and often ended up in this forum when looking for information. Please feel free to correct me or guide me in a different direction if you feel like I made some wrong assumptions.
  • I want to ride it all year round. Winters are becoming less and less harsh, but it's raining often. Thats why mudguards are a must and -from what I've read so far- only frames with with eyelets allow for an trouble-free mount (?).
  • I will ride mostly roads (commuting), but would also like to ride on light gravel and paved forest roads. So from what I've read, tires at about 28mm to 33mm width should be adequate. I'd also like a tubeless ready wheelset although I'd consider changing them later.
  • The bike infrastructure in my city is abysmal. Therefore I'm looking for something where I can sit a little more upright to keep an eye on my surroundings. I assume a relaxed road geometry or a sporty endurance frame should do. I recently sat on a colleague's Canyon Endurace 7.0 and it felt pretty good, although I didn't ride it for a longer time. Considering geometry, I'm 1,82m tall, my inner leg height is 90cm and I'm pretty flexible (can lie my hands flat on the ground while legs stretched).
  • Considering said bad/nonexisting bike lanes, I think hydraulic disc brakes are a plus to be able to react quickly, when riding down a wet hill and getting cut a car. What do you think?
  • Regarding the groupset, I'm looking for a 105 or something similar, preferably 2*10.
  • I don't know about frame material.
  • Last but not least it should be reasonably light.
Due to covid its hard to find new bikes, so I'm strongly considering buying a used one. I'm also interested in building one from the ground up. I did basic maintenance on my bikes in the past and am somewhat manually skilled.

I already found some good recommendations in this thread, but it went in a somewhat different direction:

viewtopic.php?t=163545

First some road bikes that I'm eyeing, that I ruled out because of a lack of mudguard mounts, that might give you an idea of what I'm looking for and for me to illustrate my train of thought.

Giant TCR Advanced (used around 1200€):
+great price
+great frame
+great weight
+105 or groupset
+tubeless ready wheelset
-narrow tire clearance (2020+ models have 32mm width, but are out of my price range)
-no mudguard mounts
-used models mostly rim brakes

Cervelo R3 rim (used around 1300€) - pretty much the same pro/cons as above. I think I read somewhere that models pre 2013 had some reliabilty issues
+good price
+great frame
+great weight
+105 groupset
-narrow tire clearance
-no mudguard mounts
-used models mostly rim brakes

Canyon Endurace 7.0 disc (New 1500€):
+reasonable price
+OKish weight
+105 groupset
+wide tire clearance
+tubeless ready wheelset
-no mudguard mounts

Scott Addict
-I'm completely lost on the sheer amount of models they released under this name
-no mudguard mounts

Now some models that I'm considering, but didnt find any good deals for yet:

Giant Defy Advanced
+OKish price
+OKish weight
+105 groupset
+tubeless ready wheelset
+wide tire clearance
+mudguard mounts
+disc brakes

Cannondale Synapse
+OKish price
+OKish weight
+105 groupset
+wide tire clearance
+mudguard mounts
+disc brakes
-tubular wheelset

Ribble CGR
+Great Price
+customizable
+wide tire clearance
+mudguard mounts
+disc brakes
-tubular wheelset
-somewhat heavy

Focus Paralane
+OKish price
+nice weight
+wide tire clearance
+mudguard mounts
+disc brakes
-tubular wheelset

Because I can't find those models atm I would love to hear some alternatives.

Also, as said before, I'd love to pick a quality frame that fits my needs, try to get a deal on a used groupset and wheels and build a bike on my own. But I guess that would be more expensive than getting a complete one and exchanging the wheelset if it sucks.

I'm also interested in some real life experiences considering these models. Is the fender mounting system trash? Does it steer like a traktor? Etc.

Thanks for reading.

TourmaletteduFromage
Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Jul 10, 2020 7:37 am

by TourmaletteduFromage

Secondhand BMC Roadmachine with 105 fits the budget and wishlist.

by Weenie


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TheDoctor
Posts: 146
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2017 9:56 pm

by TheDoctor

I can also suggest to take a look at the Giant Contend SL. Comes with full 105. I liked it (used it as a rental bike); not the lightest with the aluminium frame but handles well. I believe Giant has dedicated mudguards for them too.

Nickldn
Posts: 1004
Joined: Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:35 am

by Nickldn

TheDoctor wrote:
Thu Dec 02, 2021 11:42 am
I can also suggest to take a look at the Giant Contend SL. Comes with full 105. I liked it (used it as a rental bike); not the lightest with the aluminium frame but handles well. I believe Giant has dedicated mudguards for them too.
I second this suggestion. Had a rim brake Contend SL and it's an excellent frame, very comfortable and quite sporty (low stack) for an endurance frame.

Could probably use the stock wheels for winter (Giant tubless tyres are durable) and get some snazzy 45mm deep carbon wheels with GP5000s tr, or similar for summer.
Giant Propel Advanced SL Red Etap 11s Easton EC90 wheels CeramicSpeed BB 6.5kg

Vitus ZX1 CRS Campy Chorus 12s Bora WTO 45 disk brake wheels Yoeleo H10 bars 7.5kg

impact
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2021 7:37 pm

by impact

Thanks for the suggestions, I'll keep an eye these models aswell.

Today, I checked a few local bike shops for road bikes, but the only drop bar bike I could find was a Cube Nuroad Race FE, which comes preinstalled with fenders and a relaxed geometry. So I thought it might be good fit. However, when I rode it, it felt a too upright. It was an M while Cube's website recommends an L at my size, but I dont think it would do much of a difference. This might be, because I have rather long arms that compensate for my small torso. Maybe I should have noticed, that I'm currently riding a 70s peugeot bike with pretty low drops without any backpain. It's hard to describe, but the feeling of being glued to the road really makes the roadbike-feel to me :noidea: . Maybe I should get a bike fit after all...

Also, I'm reconsidering rim brakes for a few reasons: I've always ridden them and never crashed. I guess it takes a little more foresight and if I'm getting into some near death experience that I contemplated earlier as a reason for rim brakes, I did something wrong anyways. What do you think? It would open up the field of models immensly.

Also I have no idea how much my current bike weighs, but there are a lot of hills where I live, so a light frame/fork would be great. I understand that there is much more to a great frame than weight but I I guess I didn't end up on in this community for no reason :lol: .

Lastly I just had a look at some non proprietary fenders (SKS Raceblades) and they don't seem flimsy at all. I was under the impression that -without proper eyelets- I have to go with MTB-style clip-on ones , that I've had really bad experiences with in the past. Any thoughts?

I feel like I'm running in circles :noidea:

Nickldn
Posts: 1004
Joined: Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:35 am

by Nickldn

It sounds like you are perhaps over thinking your 'perfect out of the box commuter bike'.

Having a bike fit is valuable if you are suffering discomfort on your current bike, or perhaps trying to extract the maximum amount of power in a highly aero position, for racing. But you're not (or are you??).

You probably won't find anything identical to your current Peugeot, but it's good to try new things to find out if you will like/dislike them after say 100 miles.

I would say that if you are currently riding a bike you like and are comfortable with, then find something with a similar fit and then you will be able to adjust finer fit details, like the handlebar reach/drop with a replacement stem, or even new handlebars. A setback seat post may be considered too.

As for weight, remember the frame is just one component. Other components also determine weight, such as wheels/seatpost/bars. Nothing prevents you buying a bike now and upgrading parts to reduce weight later.
Giant Propel Advanced SL Red Etap 11s Easton EC90 wheels CeramicSpeed BB 6.5kg

Vitus ZX1 CRS Campy Chorus 12s Bora WTO 45 disk brake wheels Yoeleo H10 bars 7.5kg

User avatar
TheDoctor
Posts: 146
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2017 9:56 pm

by TheDoctor

I agree with the above. You are taking chances asking for disc/rim opinions over here though, that might get out of control fast :lol:
For the use as you describe it, year-round including bad weather, discs would be a good choice and it would make fender integration easier too. Sure rim bikes will be cheaper and lighter, but the choices for good full fenders will be limited. I used to have a rim bike for winter use with long reach calipers that fitted well over fenders, but these are not common and the ones I had left a lot to be desired in braking performance. N=1 data set, but if it were my choice I would pick 105 disc for such use.
By the way I know it's blasphemy on a site like this and I too like light bikes but to be honest, a kg more or less won't really matter on the road for non-racers, especially for an all-year bike. I'd rather take a slightly heavier bike that ticks all the boxes (including fit!) than a lighter one that doesn't.

rwoofer
Posts: 47
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2019 9:24 pm

by rwoofer

Curiously I've always found it easier to find fenders/mudguards for rim brake bikes, probably cause they've been around longer. Both of my year round/winter bikes are rim, mostly because they are cheaper bikes and that is where disc really do suffer on the weight side. If you can splash the cash to be comfortable with the weight, I would go disc, if budget tighter, then rim.

basilic
Posts: 897
Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2011 8:05 am
Location: Geneva, Switzerland

by basilic

Older rim road frames generally don't have the clearance and mudguard eyelets; if you found one used in your size it'd be a unicorn.
I'd look at new disc frames, these will have the space required. Aluminum frames are perfectly fine, esp. with the fatter tires, and hit the right pricepoint.
In your first post you said you wanted endurance geo to have a better view of the road. I'm not sure that makes sense, the angle won't be that different.
Also you mentioned "tubular wheels" as a con for several models - are you sure? People run these bikes with clinchers, often tubeless. Plus one can always change the wheels.

ghostinthemachine
Posts: 568
Joined: Thu May 07, 2015 9:18 pm

by ghostinthemachine

New Synapse, GCR and Paralanes all come with tubeless ready (or clincher) wheels/tyres.
And for the last 2 or 3 years. None of them have tubulars as stock (and tubulars are certainly not common at your price point!)

Unless it's a second hand bike someone has added tubular wheels too.

Have a look at Kinesis and Bowman as well. They have some highly rated aluminium disc frames with good clearances (and mudguard eyes for some models)

WorkonSunday
Posts: 442
Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:39 pm

by WorkonSunday

are you sure you can order the ribble CGR with tubular wheels? even if you can, i think you must be paying a premium over tubeless ones. At you price range, i would pick a Ribble endurance AL with 105 or Canyon Endurace, sell the wheels and pick up a pair of Prime Attacquer Disc or if budget allows zipp 303s.
Last edited by WorkonSunday on Fri Dec 03, 2021 11:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
Some say pour 10ml water out of your bottle to save that last bit of the weight. Sorry, i go one step further, i tend to the rider off my bikes. :thumbup:

the jackel
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2007 7:44 pm
Location: London

by the jackel

The Boardman SLR range, if available in your area, should meet all your criteria. I know a good number of people using a CAAD13 as their winter training bike. Budget will likely be blown but not stupidly so but otherwise this would be a solid choice
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User avatar
Lewn777
Posts: 1237
Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2017 5:35 am

by Lewn777

Surely what you want is a Roubaix type bike?
For wet winters and enough tire clearance to take mud guards you'd probably want a disk brake bike. Have a look at Bowman Weald, might fit your parameters.
https://bowman-cycles.com/products/wea ... ar8000disc

by Weenie


Visit starbike.com Online Retailer for HighEnd cycling components
Great Prices ✓    Broad Selection ✓    Worldwide Delivery ✓

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