2022 PRO Thread

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Orbital
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by Orbital

Pardon my ignorance, but every sport has coaches who specialize in certain areas on every team. Why do cycling teams not employ descending coaches for example. So much talk about marginal gains in the technology and diets of riders, but why not skills?

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Lelandjt
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by Lelandjt

Orbital wrote:
Fri May 27, 2022 4:42 pm
Pardon my ignorance, but every sport has coaches who specialize in certain areas on every team. Why do cycling teams not employ descending coaches for example. So much talk about marginal gains in the technology and diets of riders, but why not skills?
This has traditionally been a blind spot in road racing and cross country, I guess due to the heavy emphasis placed on fitness training and the greater time gaps created on climbs than downhills. XC seems to have finally figured it out, with the help of the rise of enduro racing and dropper posts, and spurred on by more technical tracks. I think road racing is starting to figure it out since I've seen more races won on the decent in recent years.

Downhillers have scratched their heads for years wondering how some people can spend so much time sitting on a bike and pedaling it without ever playing around with how to ride it better. I've always assumed some people are drawn to the exercise while some are drawn to the riding.

BenSiskri
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by BenSiskri

Orbital wrote:
Fri May 27, 2022 4:42 pm
Pardon my ignorance, but every sport has coaches who specialize in certain areas on every team. Why do cycling teams not employ descending coaches for example. So much talk about marginal gains in the technology and diets of riders, but why not skills?
Already been mentioned above; I've always thought that as road cycling isn't a skills based sport, it's not thought important. Your power, watts, w/kg, etc is the main criteria for performance. And we've seen some pretty awful technical riders be successful, so is it even looked at?

We've seen in XC a few of the women decide they need to up their skills, and have had DH/Enduro riders teach them skills to improve.
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UpFromOne
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by UpFromOne

DH training for roadies will only take off when we all have dropper posts :lol:

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ultimobici
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by ultimobici

Orbital wrote:Pardon my ignorance, but every sport has coaches who specialize in certain areas on every team. Why do cycling teams not employ descending coaches for example. So much talk about marginal gains in the technology and diets of riders, but why not skills?
Often it’s not just skill but a mental block. I seen to remember Basso having an issue descending almost 20 years ago that was addressed using music.


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spokenwords
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by spokenwords

regarding descending: one of the best cyclists I ever trained with was not a good descender. He just didnt enjoy it. Loved going up but not coming down. It sort of reminds me of how we have a tendency to work on the things we enjoy working on.
and the comment about Bernal and knowing the bike mannerisms when on rough terrain. I find that very true. Between that and having a bike that fits properly it plays a big role, even if just mentally. The worst descending I ever did was on a bike that just wasnt right for me.
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Lelandjt
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by Lelandjt

UpFromOne wrote:
Fri May 27, 2022 6:58 pm
DH training for roadies will only take off when we all have dropper posts :lol:
With the seat all the way up it's pretty hard to catch and save a slide, almost impossible when the front tire lets go. Lower seats will allow rides to get more comfortable playing with the limits of grip. Until then many riders (including myself) just won't take the risk of approaching their tires' limit of grip. They see the reward as not worth the risk so even when taking ideal lines and using the best techniques corner speeds and lean angles are less than riders willing to take that risk.

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Lelandjt
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by Lelandjt

spokenwords wrote:
Fri May 27, 2022 9:15 pm
Having a bike that fits properly it plays a big role, even if just mentally. The worst descending I ever did was on a bike that just wasnt right for me.
I like the more gradual weight transitions of a longer top tube. I find short bikes twitchy and really disagree with the small frame trend that might have peaked and passed by now. I ride 60 or 61s with a 110 stem but suspect most fitters would put me on a 58. The sketchiest descending I ever did was in Spain on a borrowed 56. The 130 stem felt like a tiller and I was on top of the front wheel. Adjusting weight between the front and back tires required extremely subtle movements.

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by BdaGhisallo

ultimobici wrote:
Fri May 27, 2022 7:03 pm
Orbital wrote:Pardon my ignorance, but every sport has coaches who specialize in certain areas on every team. Why do cycling teams not employ descending coaches for example. So much talk about marginal gains in the technology and diets of riders, but why not skills?
Often it’s not just skill but a mental block. I seen to remember Basso having an issue descending almost 20 years ago that was addressed using music.


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That was Gianni Bugno, prior to the 1990 season. It was said that he listened to Mozart to cure his vertigo at the start of descents.

Haydn
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by Haydn

Brad Wiggins absolutely loves handing it back to the commentary team

basilic
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by basilic

Jai! great show on Fedaia

Karvalo
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by Karvalo

I'm so glad one of them finally managed to break free instead of the top 3 still riding in together to the TT.

maquisard
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by maquisard

I agree, good to see someone make a definitive attack and for them to stamp authority on the lead.

I was surprised how badly Carapaz cracked. He looked uncomfortable trying to stay with Kamna and Hindley but once Jai committed to his attack Carapaz looked really bad. He did well to limit his losses actually.

Well deserved by Hindley, and unlike his Giro against TGH in 2020 which was a case of last man standing in the GC, 2022 had a strong field of leaders and teams.

Delighted for Bora as well

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by Mr.Gib

!
Last edited by Mr.Gib on Sun May 29, 2022 5:36 am, edited 1 time in total.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

by Weenie


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Mr.Gib
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by Mr.Gib

Orbital wrote:
Fri May 27, 2022 4:42 pm
Pardon my ignorance, but every sport has coaches who specialize in certain areas on every team. Why do cycling teams not employ descending coaches for example. So much talk about marginal gains in the technology and diets of riders, but why not skills?
Sean Kelly addressed this while commenting on some weak descending at the Giro. He speculated that many riders accept the descending that they do during training as good enough and simply do the same thing at races but try to do it faster. Most of the coaches are ex-riders and probably no different. In fact they are not really coaches at all, just ex-riders.
Lelandjt wrote:
Fri May 27, 2022 9:24 pm
I like the more gradual weight transitions of a longer top tube. I find short bikes twitchy and really disagree with the small frame trend that might have peaked and passed by now. I ride 60 or 61s with a 110 stem but suspect most fitters would put me on a 58. The sketchiest descending I ever did was in Spain on a borrowed 56. The 130 stem felt like a tiller and I was on top of the front wheel. Adjusting weight between the front and back tires required extremely subtle movements.
A change in equipment (materials, geometry, and fit) may account for some of the bad descending we see. It is common in sport that a change in technology requires a change in techique. For many, what worked in the past might be inadequate with new tech. Sometimes it takes someone with more creativity or more advanced analysis to "discover" the technique adjustments that are required to get the most out of the new technology. The "new" technique is then widely adopted. Ask yourself why riders are sticking their inside knee out. Other than to catch wind and provide air braking, doing so only interferes with the bodies ability to maintain good traction, adjust position and balance against the road contact point.
wheelsONfire wrote: When we ride disc brakes the whole deal of braking is just like a leaving a fart. It happens and then it's over. Nothing planned and nothing to get nervous for.

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