Heated insoles - personal experience pls

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wobbly
Posts: 247
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 3:50 pm

by wobbly

Which ones work best ?
Several brands between $100 and $200 but which work well ? Can't trust website feedback and not sure about those with battery hanging out of boot. Maybe ok for motorbikers.
Your experiences valued please.

by Weenie


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IrrelevantD
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by IrrelevantD

wobbly wrote:
Mon Jan 06, 2020 1:28 pm
Which ones work best ?
Several brands between $100 and $200 but which work well ? Can't trust website feedback and not sure about those with battery hanging out of boot. Maybe ok for motorbikers.
Your experiences valued please.
My personal experience is don't get any that have the batteries built in. I tried a pair and while they kept my feet nice and toasty, they lifted my heel up which caused it to rub on the top of the heel cup giving me some annoying blisters pretty quick. If you do try them, get ones with external batteries.

I found it much better to buy winter shoes (Northwave Arctic GTX) with enough room for thick socks and still space to move your toes, good gloves, hats and vests. If you keep your core, head and hands warm, your body will re-direct heat to where it needs it.
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jfranci3
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by jfranci3

Motorbikes aren't cardio. Look for XC skiing or bike stuff. You need to be sure the insole isn't too thick. It only takes 1mm or so of extra thickness to be too thick. You might need to buy a cheap set of shoes with more volume. Make sure the heating element gets to the forefoot. Unique to the bike, is the cleat. If you're on MTB cleats, it is metal and will conduct the cold right into your foot. Put a piece of cardboard, neoprean, or aerogel (cut up a cheap insole) over your cleat.

On the thick sock thing... this doesn't work for more than an hour. You're just introducing more sock to hold water to then freeze, and likely cutting off circulation to the foot. A thinner sock forces the water out. If thick socks work for you, you're better off using two thin socks usually. For longer rides, bring a spare pair. Maybe use a Drymax ( Olefin) sock as the inner sock to keep water away from your foot. I've had good luck with Primaloft socks for thin, warm, non-soggy socks.

I tried NW GTX shoes. THey're water proof, but they they don't breathe well, so you end up with a soggy, cold foot. You're better off putting insultion on the outside of your shoe for the most part, as it'll dry and wont restrict circulation. I've had good luck with Sealskins knit covers for flexible outter covers, you can put a toe cover overthem if its super wet, like when the ground defrosts.

wobbly
Posts: 247
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 3:50 pm

by wobbly

thanks both

@ID, I've got enough space in a pair of winter shoes to play with the insole - which brand did you get ?

@JF, I will try 2 thin pairs. I've got a good set of mudguards and cold is usually the main problem here - not wet weather

anyone else any recos ?

cheers

jfranci3
Posts: 1033
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2016 5:21 pm

by jfranci3

I'm talking wet from the inside. WHen you ride, you'll sweat even though you're cold. THat will freeze your feet. Anyway, try a defeet or similar belgian bootie under your overshoe rather than going with thicker socks. Aside from holding more moisture as I said above, you'll compress that insulation, making it worthless. Air keeps you warm, not more insulation. Compressing your socks will bring their insultion value to 0 as you'll just be conducting the outside temp to your feet rather than trapping air.

Insulation measures before and after compressing it.
http://www.aerotherminsulation.com/site ... s/clo0.gif
http://www.aerotherminsulation.com/site ... s/clo2.gif

I live in a (generally) dry winter area also. You still need to worry about wet from the outside as in the winter the ground will be colder than the air, causing condensation on the ground.

mdeth1313
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by mdeth1313

I tried the external battery ones - they worked well enough but I didn't like the battery hanging out. Two attempts at the insoles with the batter inside failed - couldn't even get them in my shoes.

Interestingly enough what's working out well now are the toe warmers on the top of my foot (over a thin wool sock). Then a pair of mavic toe covers, and depending on the temps outside - various layers of shoe covers. Works well to about 10 degrees farenheit. Lower than that I use the same setup but with a pair of northwave winter shoes (older ones).
Speedplay is the devil!

by Weenie


Catagory6
Posts: 524
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2017 2:36 am

by Catagory6

i can go well below freezing with this method

1. lightweight wool sock
2. GRABER brand chemical heating pad on top of toe. never met another brand that works anywhere near as well
3. cycling shoe
4. plastic produce bag over toe and cleat, for additional wind protection
5. toe/shoe cover or bootie

guess this is similar to mdeth's method, now that i read it

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