Winter gloves

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gb123bike
Posts: 50
Joined: Mon Dec 16, 2019 1:02 am

by gb123bike

So we had the Winter Road Shoes thread. Can we do gloves next?

For years I've been hunting for a warm set of winter gloves. I've spent at least US$500 on different kinds and brands. Wool liners, lobster style gloves, gloves made for skiing rather than biking, you name it, but I still get painful hands and that limits how long I can stay out at cold temps to sometimes 10 minutes before it's too painful to go on.

Most of the gloves I've tried are fine down to freezing / 0C. At my coldest riding temps of around -35C, my feet are fine, my torso and legs are fine, my face is fine in a ski mask and balaclava, but oh boy do I suffer painful hands. I think I've come close to frostbite a few times.

I need enough dex to run road shifters on drop bars, so it's hard to use mittens, although lobster style works. What do you all use? What's the #1 warmest set of winter riding gloves you've tried, and what's the lowest temps you've run them in?

It's always hard to compare because different people have different physiologies, but it'll be nice to have some experiences to compare to.

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IrrelevantD
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by IrrelevantD

I have been pretty happy with some different weights of Swix cross-country ski gloves and lobster claws, especially the lobster claws. That being said, we rarely get temps below 25~28ºF.

One thing you might try is maybe a warmer hat and more arm and torso coverage. Good warm hat will get your body to direct more heat to other areas (feet, hands) and having the best gloves in the world won't do much if you're loosing all of your heat in your arms and torso.
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by Weenie


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ms6073
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by ms6073

While they might be a tad hard to find, I can say that at ~35° f my hands are pretty warm with Sportful Sotto Zero gloves and sweating much above 45° f but not sure about how waterproof they are as I avoid riding when it is near freezing and raining.
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jfranci3
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by jfranci3

One thing I've found... bigger sizes. You don't want to squish the insulation because compressed insulation has an r-value of near 0. You also don't want to cool your hand from conductive cooling - air keeps you warm, not insultion material. I wear a size 9 glove, but have been trying size 10 or 11.

kode54
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by kode54

I wear VOID mittens with a chemical pack when the temps drop below 32F. I can wear them down to 19F. If I use gloves even with chemical heat packs, my hands still get cold. I never found any gloves that keep my hands warm enough to ride around the freezing point. I’ve tried most of the Assos gloves, all the Rapha gloves, GORE gloves with Goretex and windblock...all about the same. I have less issues when the temps are at 40F and above.
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bilwit
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by bilwit

I also struggle with this and have dumped loads on gloves that don't work for me. I picked up Velotoze winter gloves and Dissent 133 gloves recently but we've had a very mild winter this year. When it was in the low 30Fs, the Velotoze with one of the liner from the Dissent 133 was enough for me. The Dissent stuff comes with essentially two inside liners but I haven't had to fully layer up yet. I think layering and being airproof on the outer layer is key.

gb123bike
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Joined: Mon Dec 16, 2019 1:02 am

by gb123bike

jfranci3 wrote:
Tue Jan 07, 2020 10:53 pm
One thing I've found... bigger sizes. You don't want to squish the insulation because compressed insulation has an r-value of near 0. You also don't want to cool your hand from conductive cooling - air keeps you warm, not insultion material. I wear a size 9 glove, but have been trying size 10 or 11.
That's very good advice and something I didn't do very well last time I bought gloves. I'm going to keep it in mind for my next glove experiment for sure.

Also, bigger sizes make it easier to drop chemical hand warmers into the gloves. That helps, but even with those, they mostly help your palms and not the fingers where the biggest heat retention problem is for me.

gb123bike
Posts: 50
Joined: Mon Dec 16, 2019 1:02 am

by gb123bike

bilwit wrote:
Wed Jan 08, 2020 11:16 pm
I also struggle with this and have dumped loads on gloves that don't work for me.
Yeah, I hear ya. Sometimes I think I could have bought a whole bike with the amount I've dropped on glove experiments over the years.

uraqt
Posts: 923
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 8:53 am

by uraqt

So based on another thread here I bought these and I love them for in the rain...

https://glacierglove.com/perfect-curve-glove/

I also took the "Dissent 133 gloves" idea and bought these

https://www.roostersailing.com/pd/PolyP ... 105313.htm

That I use winter, spring and fall under the glacier glove or defeet gloves ..rain/no-rain

I just bought rooster's Hot Hands gloves as a test ...

C

cdncyclist
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2016 12:10 am

by cdncyclist

Heated gloves. It is a little bulky with the battery at your wrist, but way better than freezing your fingers.

I tend to have cold fingers even at mild temp (-10C), this allows me to ride much lower -20 to -30C with an overmit over the soft gloves. Interestingly my hands aren't hot, in fact sometimes feel a little cool, but not cold at the low temps.

http://powerinmotion.ca/Products/Heated ... ove-Liners

gb123bike
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Joined: Mon Dec 16, 2019 1:02 am

by gb123bike

cdncyclist wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 5:38 pm
I tend to have cold fingers even at mild temp (-10C), this allows me to ride much lower -20 to -30C with an overmit over the soft gloves. Interestingly my hands aren't hot, in fact sometimes feel a little cool, but not cold at the low temps.
Oh, those look great. A bit expensive, but if they're designed by and for cyclists in Calgary, they'd be made for serious winter conditions for sure. (I'm well south of there in the northern US). I've always been hesitant to drop that kind of cash on gloves, but it helps a lot to have a first hand anecdote like yours. Your experience sounds a lot like mine (cold fingers even at -10C), so if they work at -30C for you that's a big help to hear. Nothing else I've found has worked well for me down in that range.

It looks like they offer two batteries. Do you know which one you have? I'm tempted to get the bigger one, as long as it isn't infeasibly bulky.

rgamble
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Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2012 12:34 am

by rgamble

cdncyclist wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 5:38 pm
Heated gloves. It is a little bulky with the battery at your wrist, but way better than freezing your fingers.

I tend to have cold fingers even at mild temp (-10C), this allows me to ride much lower -20 to -30C with an overmit over the soft gloves. Interestingly my hands aren't hot, in fact sometimes feel a little cool, but not cold at the low temps.

http://powerinmotion.ca/Products/Heated ... ove-Liners
Same for me.

I would add these 12v gloves also have what they call a "stickman" powercord. It allows you to put the batteries in a back pocket connecting to the glove via an idiot mitten like connection.

cdncyclist
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2016 12:10 am

by cdncyclist

gb123bike wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 8:07 pm
cdncyclist wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 5:38 pm
I tend to have cold fingers even at mild temp (-10C), this allows me to ride much lower -20 to -30C with an overmit over the soft gloves. Interestingly my hands aren't hot, in fact sometimes feel a little cool, but not cold at the low temps.
Oh, those look great. A bit expensive, but if they're designed by and for cyclists in Calgary, they'd be made for serious winter conditions for sure. (I'm well south of there in the northern US). I've always been hesitant to drop that kind of cash on gloves, but it helps a lot to have a first hand anecdote like yours. Your experience sounds a lot like mine (cold fingers even at -10C), so if they work at -30C for you that's a big help to hear. Nothing else I've found has worked well for me down in that range.

It looks like they offer two batteries. Do you know which one you have? I'm tempted to get the bigger one, as long as it isn't infeasibly bulky.
I beleive they just have the one size of battery, which lasts quite a while especially with the 3 heat settings. And yes, if it wasn't for these I am not sure I would be able to do much winter riding outside (although have not tried bar mits).

While I have the liners, looks like they now offer a ski glove type and a 'work' glove type. The one awkward part about the liners is that it can be challenging to find an overmit that fits and is good for cycling. Don't have any experience with those, but they look interesting.

jfranci3
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Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2016 5:21 pm

by jfranci3

I just got a set of Blackdiamond Polartec Grid middleweight (200) fleece liner gloves. Havent gotten a chance to try them, but they look pretty promissing. They seem like they'll warm well while leaving air gaps for breathabilty and reducing conductive heat loss. I was suprised how thin the 'middle' weight was, as they seem only slightly thicker than a set of wool liners.

Suppersppy
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed Jun 26, 2019 7:41 pm

by Suppersppy

I just finished a review of the Assos Ultraz Winter Gloves. https://cycletechreview.com/2020/clothi ... es-review/

To expand on what I say there: They are pretty much as warm of a cycling specific, seperated finger, glove as is made. It's still not warm enough when it gets near freezing and if it's raining, hard, then you've only got a couple of hours and you'll need to switch to a second pair of gloves. I have had luck for colder weather with a pair of pearl izumi gloves that have the pinky and ring finger combined (not a full lobster glove). At a certain point though I just don't think that cycling gloves are designed for really cold weather. Try fat biking specific stuff or ski/snowboard gloves.

by Weenie


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