lightweight seat bags

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gb123bike
Posts: 50
Joined: Mon Dec 16, 2019 1:02 am

by gb123bike

I'm rocking a positively paleolithic Nashbar saddle/seat bag which was dug up by archeologists and used by neanderthal cyclists on bikes with stone wheels. It's also kind of heavy, about 150g, and seems over-built for what I want it for which is stashing some "must have" items on the bike so I never, ever forget 'em.

It's starting to fail, and I want to find a new one. Problem is... all the new saddlebags I can find seem horrible in one way or another. They're heavy, they're small, the rail attachments are awkward, the zippers are bad, it's always something. I've tried a half dozen kinds. I really like the design of my paleolithic one, and can't find a modern one I like as much - heavy or not heavy.

Those of you who use saddlebags, what are you running?

mike
Resident Pro
Posts: 2802
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 9:42 pm

by mike

ww's don't use saddlebags. try a bottle canister which stores things, and of course jersey pockets

by Weenie


claus
Posts: 309
Joined: Fri Oct 31, 2008 10:04 pm

by claus

Plastic bag (the kind which some UK companies use for shipping) with 2 releasable zip ties.
That's probably lighter than a bottle.

blaugrana
Posts: 154
Joined: Wed May 24, 2017 9:49 pm

by blaugrana

If you don't need to be opening it often (i.e. just when you have a puncture), the old method of wrapping everything in a sock and tying it to the rails with a toe strap works well, and it's very light too. It's not the best option if you want to store things like a multitool, though.

gb123bike
Posts: 50
Joined: Mon Dec 16, 2019 1:02 am

by gb123bike

blaugrana wrote:
Wed Dec 18, 2019 5:13 pm
If you don't need to be opening it often (i.e. just when you have a puncture), the old method of wrapping everything in a sock and tying it to the rails with a toe strap works well, and it's very light too. It's not the best option if you want to store things like a multitool, though.
I do toss other things in there, but I think this idea could form the basis of something much like what I want. I'm thinking a lightweight nylon bag of some sort, which would have to close securely with a zipper, could be fastened to the rails much like your sock idea.

Should be possible to fashion something out of random flotsom.

addictR1
Posts: 1829
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2012 1:11 am

by addictR1

mike wrote:ww's don't use saddlebags. try a bottle canister which stores things, and of course jersey pockets
+1 on the jersey pocket. Even when I’m doing a century ride, instead of saddle bag, I just roll a spare tubular tire nicely tucked under the saddle. The rest in pocket or in another small water bottle to hold stuffs.

froze
Posts: 215
Joined: Thu Aug 05, 2010 3:47 am

by froze

NEVER put anything hard like tools or pumps in your jersey pockets, why you all scream while throwing rocks at me? Because I've known several people over the 40 some odd years I've been riding that had crashes and got hurt really bad by something hard they had in their pockets...minds out of the gutter please...anyways, a couple of guys that I know of had to have back fusion done.

Other odd things too can happen in accidents, fanny bags with hard stuff inside can, and has, caused damage to the kidneys. I knew a guy that was wearing his Walkman, yes this goes back some years, had a crash and he severely bruised his kidney and couldn't ride for at least a year if I recall. Another odd thing I saw was a friend of mine was wearing a cross around his neck, he crashed, and somehow that cross penetrated his throat by about an inch and a 1/2 missing his main artery by about a 1/2 of inch with only the chain sticking out, it was nasty but not a lot of bleeding till the cross was pulled out at the hospital, not super duper close but close enough that it made him quite nervous, he never wore anything around his neck after that, the cross had to be surgically removed.

Needless to say I don't put anything on my body that is hard, bananas and the such is fine in a jersey pocket.

You say you want a lightweight saddle bag, fine, but remember the lighter the weight the less durable it is and the smaller it has to be. Lezyne makes a model called the Caddy that weighs about 75 grams for the small one, as does Evoc who claims their's is only 70 grams; also Topeak DynaWedge Bicycle Saddle Bag in the small size is only 50 grams; those all can be found on Amazon, but personally I wouldn't buy any of them, I think the lighter weight factor will allow them to wear out to fast.

I use Topeak Aero Wedge medium on one bike and large on my former now dead touring bike, those weigh 130 to 165 grams but they last longer than any saddle bag I've ever owned over the last 40 years. I did buy an oddball low priced BV Bicycle Strap-On Bike Saddle Bag/Seat Bag/Cycling Bag (found on Amazon) just to try it out, this bag only retails for $12 but it's made of seemingly the exact same materials as the Topeak Aero Wedge, I can't tell the difference in the materials at all. Both the Topeak and the BV expand, the Topeak expands out the back of the bag while the BV expands out the bottom of the bag, so if you have something long you may want the Topeak. I got the large version because it's closer to the Topeak medium size, and it weighs around 136 grams. I've had the BV for about 2 years and so far no signs of wear, if this darn thing lasts as long as the Topeaks do I won't be buying Topeak anymore!

The Topeak Aero Wedge bag large is large enough that I could carry a spare ultralight folding tire inside the bag along with a spare tube, tools, and flat kit, and when I expanded it I could put energy bars into it with the rest of the crap. I no longer carry a spare tire because tires in the last 10 years have improved dramatically, and I don't ride on Conti tires with their paper thin sidewalls anymore either.

Because I do use the bags for commuting and touring, as well as weekend riding I do put all my stuff in a small ziplock bag and then the bag goes inside the saddlebag, I've also waterproof treated my bags but that's not foolproof.

Anyway just some random thoughts.

Bigger Gear
Posts: 530
Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2009 6:58 pm
Location: Wet coast, Canada

by Bigger Gear

I don't get the saddle bag hate either. I much prefer to have stuff in a small saddle bag and my jersey can take food, clothing extras, and my phone. For road riding I use a Lezyne Road Caddy, it's small and I can fit a tube, glueless patches, one lever, and a small multi-tool in there. For gravel or longer days I use a Silca Premio Roll, I can squeeze in 2 road tubes or one larger tube plus the patch kit, lever, multi-tool. I also always carry a pair of medical (latex/rubber) gloves in my saddle bag to put on if I'm changing a flat when it's wet out. I once wiped my bare hands in the wet grass and got a nice surprise....

I'm pretty old school I guess because I also almost always have a frame pump. If not I have a Lezyne Road Drive in my jersey pocket. I never use CO2.

NickJHP
Posts: 382
Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:22 am
Location: Canberra, Australia

by NickJHP

I use the Rixen & Kaul klickfix saddle bags. They're available in a range of sizes, all of which use the same mounting system. I usually use one of the larger expandable ones, as I dislike riding around with my pockets stuffed full. I think the bag is called a micro 200 expandable.

addictR1
Posts: 1829
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2012 1:11 am

by addictR1

froze wrote:NEVER put anything hard like tools or pumps in your jersey pockets, why you all scream while throwing rocks at me? Because I've known several people over the 40 some odd years I've been riding that had crashes and got hurt really bad by something hard they had in their pockets...minds out of the gutter please...anyways, a couple of guys that I know of had to have back fusion done.

Other odd things too can happen in accidents, fanny bags with hard stuff inside can, and has, caused damage to the kidneys. I knew a guy that was wearing his Walkman, yes this goes back some years, had a crash and he severely bruised his kidney and couldn't ride for at least a year if I recall. Another odd thing I saw was a friend of mine was wearing a cross around his neck, he crashed, and somehow that cross penetrated his throat by about an inch and a 1/2 missing his main artery by about a 1/2 of inch with only the chain sticking out, it was nasty but not a lot of bleeding till the cross was pulled out at the hospital, not super duper close but close enough that it made him quite nervous, he never wore anything around his neck after that, the cross had to be surgically removed.

Needless to say I don't put anything on my body that is hard, bananas and the such is fine in a jersey pocket.

You say you want a lightweight saddle bag, fine, but remember the lighter the weight the less durable it is and the smaller it has to be. Lezyne makes a model called the Caddy that weighs about 75 grams for the small one, as does Evoc who claims their's is only 70 grams; also Topeak DynaWedge Bicycle Saddle Bag in the small size is only 50 grams; those all can be found on Amazon, but personally I wouldn't buy any of them, I think the lighter weight factor will allow them to wear out to fast.

I use Topeak Aero Wedge medium on one bike and large on my former now dead touring bike, those weigh 130 to 165 grams but they last longer than any saddle bag I've ever owned over the last 40 years. I did buy an oddball low priced BV Bicycle Strap-On Bike Saddle Bag/Seat Bag/Cycling Bag (found on Amazon) just to try it out, this bag only retails for $12 but it's made of seemingly the exact same materials as the Topeak Aero Wedge, I can't tell the difference in the materials at all. Both the Topeak and the BV expand, the Topeak expands out the back of the bag while the BV expands out the bottom of the bag, so if you have something long you may want the Topeak. I got the large version because it's closer to the Topeak medium size, and it weighs around 136 grams. I've had the BV for about 2 years and so far no signs of wear, if this darn thing lasts as long as the Topeaks do I won't be buying Topeak anymore!

The Topeak Aero Wedge bag large is large enough that I could carry a spare ultralight folding tire inside the bag along with a spare tube, tools, and flat kit, and when I expanded it I could put energy bars into it with the rest of the crap. I no longer carry a spare tire because tires in the last 10 years have improved dramatically, and I don't ride on Conti tires with their paper thin sidewalls anymore either.

Because I do use the bags for commuting and touring, as well as weekend riding I do put all my stuff in a small ziplock bag and then the bag goes inside the saddlebag, I've also waterproof treated my bags but that's not foolproof.

Anyway just some random thoughts.
Good post.. I usually put a small hand pump, CO2 pump, tools, keys inside a rubber bag I got from daiso. I don’t out in the center pocket but on the sides.
But you have some valid points to think about.

Orbital
Posts: 293
Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 12:52 am
Location: Pitt Meadows, BC

by Orbital

I just picked up a Supacaz seat strap to try out. Had one of those hard shell seat clams before but it rattled over everything and was pretty heavy. Also not a fan of overloading the jersey pockets. I don’t care if pros do it, it still looks terrible.

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IrrelevantD
Posts: 761
Joined: Sun Nov 29, 2015 5:47 pm
Location: Near DFW Airport

by IrrelevantD

Personally, I've been using a Silca Seat Roll for a couple of years. Rolls up pretty tight if you don't have a lot in it and it's durability has been outstanding. Much better than anything I've used with a zipper.
* There is a 70% chance that what you have just read has a peppering of cynicism or sarcasm and generally should not be taken seriously.
I'll leave it up to you to figure out the other 30%. If you are in any way offended, that's on you.

hkgmatt
Posts: 40
Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2018 9:17 am

by hkgmatt

I love the Spurcycle Saddle Bag. Ingeniously simple, light (38g according to the manufacturer), can be attached securly, and doesn't shout out its brand.

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ALAN Carbon+
Posts: 294
Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2005 9:21 am
Location: Canberra, Australia

by ALAN Carbon+

I have the Speesleev Ranger on my road bike and hardtail, reasonably compact and can fit a decent amount in it. You can get a small version of it that is more compact than the regular size.

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by Weenie


froze
Posts: 215
Joined: Thu Aug 05, 2010 3:47 am

by froze

I know some of the bags being mentioned use a stretch band to keep it closed, those fabric stretch bands don't last long, you might get 5 years out of one before it becomes stretched out and useless. I had a bag once designed like that and that's exactly what happened, even the zip bags may have some sort of stretch thing somewhere, the Topeak Aero Wedge bag has two of them on the bottom of the bag intended to hold a pump, mine sagged and I never even used it! So I cut off the straps.

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