Cleat Position

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clutchup
Posts: 13
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:16 pm

by clutchup

I’ve been researching cleat setup recently and read information from sites featuring information from Steve Hoggs, Joe Friel, Gotz Heine, and others. It seems BOPS is the traditional recommendation however read a lot about midsole setup.

It seems the three main recommendations range from BOPS, a few mm behind BOPS, and midsole.

I was thinking of moving my cleats back however I’ve seen some information that recommends BOPS or midsole only and that moving your cleats back (behind BOPS) but not all the way to midfoot defeats the purpose and disturbs the “muscle chain”. I'm not brave enough to go all in and try midsole lol.

What’s your preferred setup?

AJS914
Posts: 3764
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

I used Steve Hogg's method. I don't think you can achieve midsole without custom shoes. Hogg has a long blog post about mid sole. I know he's a huge fan and ultimately went with a custom frame to accomdate the position.

by Weenie


TobinHatesYou
Posts: 4825
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:02 pm

by TobinHatesYou

The all or nothing bit sounds bogus to me. The farther back your cleats are, the less ankling you do. That helps fight fatigue in your calf muscles, which are smaller than the other major skeletal muscles used in pedaling (you wouldn't want your calves to fatigue first from overuse.) Anyway the ball of your foot is angled relative to your foot's position on the pedal platform, so your cleat will be almost 1cm back of the "ball" behind your big toe anyway if you want it centered. Personally, I more or less slam the cleats all the way back in the mounting plate.
Last edited by TobinHatesYou on Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Nefarious86
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by Nefarious86

I basically run my cleats so I have 2mm on clearance on the front wheel. Saddle as far forward as possible to match.

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flying
Posts: 2098
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 9:16 am

by flying

You will just have to try & see what works for you personally. Listen to your body

Granted I have ridden many years/decades so my body is set in its ways but my cleats are slid almost fully forward
(meaning shoe is further back ) but it started long ago as this is what puts me roughly at Ball of foot over spindle anyway (not that I was looking for it)

Since then many times after reading various reports/studies I have slid my cleats back a bit more & more
Always it eventually results in ankle/knee pain in a week or two & I go back to my position which is pain free always

Try different positions & see what works for you personally not what some text say's you should do.
Listen to how your body responds & adjust for "you"

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silvalis
Posts: 757
Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2015 1:02 am
Location: Aus

by silvalis

I align mine to the knuckle of the small toe rather than BOPS. its slightly set back further. usually results in the cleat slammed back in the mounting plate too.
Chasse patate

TobinHatesYou
Posts: 4825
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:02 pm

by TobinHatesYou

flying wrote:
Sun Dec 08, 2019 5:57 am

Granted I have ridden many years/decades so my body is set in its ways but my cleats are slid almost fully forward
(meaning shoe is further back ) but it started long ago as this is what puts me roughly at Ball of foot over spindle anyway (not that I was looking for it)

Since then many times after reading various reports/studies I have slid my cleats back a bit more & more
Always it eventually results in ankle/knee pain in a week or two & I go back to my position which is pain free always

Do you have a toe down pedaling style by any chance?

flying
Posts: 2098
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 9:16 am

by flying

TobinHatesYou wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 5:58 am
flying wrote:
Sun Dec 08, 2019 5:57 am

Granted I have ridden many years/decades so my body is set in its ways but my cleats are slid almost fully forward
(meaning shoe is further back ) but it started long ago as this is what puts me roughly at Ball of foot over spindle anyway (not that I was looking for it)

Since then many times after reading various reports/studies I have slid my cleats back a bit more & more
Always it eventually results in ankle/knee pain in a week or two & I go back to my position which is pain free always

Do you have a toe down pedaling style by any chance?
Fairly neutral actually & usually on rides over 3 hours I will consciously employ ankling just to relax etc

bikeboy1tr
Posts: 458
Joined: Thu Mar 21, 2013 3:19 am
Location: Southern Ontario Canada

by bikeboy1tr

flying wrote:
Sun Dec 08, 2019 5:57 am
You will just have to try & see what works for you personally. Listen to your body

Granted I have ridden many years/decades so my body is set in its ways but my cleats are slid almost fully forward
(meaning shoe is further back ) but it started long ago as this is what puts me roughly at Ball of foot over spindle anyway (not that I was looking for it)

Since then many times after reading various reports/studies I have slid my cleats back a bit more & more
Always it eventually results in ankle/knee pain in a week or two & I go back to my position which is pain free always

Try different positions & see what works for you personally not what some text say's you should do.
Listen to how your body responds & adjust for "you"
This is my situation as well. I tried a few years ago to move my cleats more to the center and I mean only 4-5mm and I had some real issues with knee pain so I moved the seat fore/aft and still no relief. I finally gave up on the idea and moved the cleats back to my original position and thats were they stay. My foot position for pedalling is also somewhat flat and when on the hills I will do more ankling as I push back in the saddle. But I am okay with this as its not for everyone and it gives me a great set of calf muscles.
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flying
Posts: 2098
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2005 9:16 am

by flying

bikeboy1tr wrote:
Thu Dec 12, 2019 2:11 am
This is my situation as well. I tried a few years ago to move my cleats more to the center and I mean only 4-5mm and I had some real issues with knee pain so I moved the seat fore/aft and still no relief. I finally gave up on the idea and moved the cleats back to my original position and thats were they stay. My foot position for pedalling is also somewhat flat and when on the hills I will do more ankling as I push back in the saddle. But I am okay with this as its not for everyone and it gives me a great set of calf muscles.
See :beerchug: As far as I am concerned that is the right way to go about it.
We read things & we try maybe they are better if not go back to what works & is pain free that is the bottom line.
People are all different :wink:

ND4SPD
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat May 19, 2018 4:10 am

by ND4SPD

I have tried many methods of measurements, many positions with my cleats, and nothing helped, my feet goes numb... I have proper thin bicycle socks... I have tied moving seatpost... I found out that if I don't tighten my shoes too tight it helps a little, but even with that, after about 30 minutes to one hour of riding my both feet, but mostly my right feet goes numb... Numbness goes away if I move my toes for a while, after that, I'm good for another cca. 30 minutes... I'm going to try with different insoles which have metatarsal suppot, probably Specialized Body Geometry SL Footbeds, they are best buy, or cleat wedges, and see if that will help...

AJS914
Posts: 3764
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

Wider shoes?

ND4SPD
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat May 19, 2018 4:10 am

by ND4SPD

No, width is OK.

NickJHP
Posts: 344
Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:22 am
Location: Canberra, Australia

by NickJHP

Once I have compensated my saddle height for the difference caused by moving cleats backwards or forwards, I can't biomechanically notice any difference over a range of about 1cm or so fore or aft - my performance relative to other riders against whom I race frequently is much the same.

by Weenie


TobinHatesYou
Posts: 4825
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:02 pm

by TobinHatesYou

NickJHP wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 7:22 am
Once I have compensated my saddle height for the difference caused by moving cleats backwards or forwards, I can't biomechanically notice any difference over a range of about 1cm or so fore or aft - my performance relative to other riders against whom I race frequently is much the same.

That makes sense unless individuals are encountering some kind of pain one way or the other. There is slop/adaptation allowed in our biomechanics, and our aerobic capacity is still usually the limiting factor.

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