do you take water when its below freezing?

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mattr
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by mattr

Shrike wrote:
Fri Nov 23, 2018 12:11 pm
The problem is longer rides sub-zero at lower pace, where my hands and feet freeze and it's painful to do anything. I do take a bottle but tend not to use it as it's torture to do anything :lol:
You talking sub zero farenheit i hope? There's plenty of inexpensive gear that'll lead to overheating at -5 degrees C. As long as a) it fits properly and b) you don't have underlying circulation/nerve issues.
Shrike wrote:
Fri Nov 23, 2018 12:11 pm
Also you risk needing to pee and that's brutal for your core body temperature. I've had times when I was going okay until I stopped to pee then never got my core temp back up and suffered for hours after it.
Yup. My hands got so cold one ride (after fixing a puncture) that i was actually sick when i got home and started running them under cold water to try and warm them up.
kgt wrote:
Fri Nov 23, 2018 6:17 pm
Riding at freezing temperatures is not a good idea anyway (for your lungs etc.)
Full gas intervals, not such a good idea. Vigorous efforts, no problems. You'll probably run out of traction before you do any significant damage to lungs.

bikeboy1tr
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by bikeboy1tr

I have been riding the winters since I started cycling and have learned much about gear for as cold as -10 C but now that I am older I draw the line at around -5C. I use the Camelback with an insulated hose and normally have no issues with the valve freezing but if it does then I blow the fluid back into the reservoir. My rides usually around 2 hours and I always drink as someone pointed out that when you exhale and can see your breath, that is moisture leaving your body so fluid has always been a priority. Two biggest things to keep warm are hands and feet so I have the Northwave winter MTB boots and run windproof booty covers to keep the boots dry and clean. The covers also keep the feet a tad bit warmer. Just ordered the new Northwave Extreme MTB shoes which should be even warmer. For most of the winter its base miles anyway so no big efforts are needed and if I have to do some efforts in the cold temps I will do them with a tale wind which makes breathing easier. Most manufacturers make some good winter gear so keeping the legs and core warm are never really an issue as long as some kind of Wind Stopper or equivelant are used in the tights and coats.
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Kermark
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by Kermark

kgt wrote:
Fri Nov 23, 2018 6:17 pm
Riding at freezing temperatures is not a good idea anyway (for your lungs etc.)
Exactly!

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tymon_tm
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by tymon_tm

not if you're healthy. of course getting from ~20C straight to 0C or even -5C within 3 weeks (that's what I'm experiencing right now) isn't good, as it feels like suffocating, esp trying to maintain the tempo and some decent intensity.

but, training below 0C allows you to harden your body and if done right, is pretty beneficial not only from upcoming season's perspective, but generally speaking makes you healthier and tougher. so what was said in posts above - lower intensity, shorter distance and proper gear is the way to go. and NEVER cover your mouth (it only makes it worse) instead get used to cold gradually.
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mattr
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by mattr

XC skiers seem to manage ok with training at subzero temps.......

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Frankie - B
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by Frankie - B

KGT Lives in Athens, although it can be cool there (10 deg C) it won't be realy cold as we get up north. It takes some accustomisation for the body to the temperature, but once that is done it's cool.
Come to think of it, when I visit Greece in april the people living there think i'm crazy for walking around in shorts when the temps go above 23 deg c. They still think it is cold. but by my standards things are quite nice at those temps.

Perception is where it is at.
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tymon_tm
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by tymon_tm

interestingly, we have more and more students coming from Arabia, Turkey, India and China (arguably warmer places than central-eastern europe), and while it's getting colder (from 0C to -10C last couple of days) they seem to dress lighter compared to local folks... :noidea:
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Frankie - B
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by Frankie - B

Hasn't that to do with fashion, Tymon? ;)
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mattr
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by mattr

They also walk around shivering here.

Attermann
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by Attermann

I live in Denmark, and get to ride sub zero degrees on/off for about three months, no problem what so ever riding around, I bought an insulated bottle, that works a lot better, and you can also have the bottle on the stomach, bad idea to drink really cold water, and just dress properly, a good base layer and a jacket that can keep the wind out, and some warm gloves.

We have warmer winters sometimes, but then there is a lot of rain instead, I think it’s worse to ride in 2 degrees and rain, than below zero and dry

bikeboy1tr
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by bikeboy1tr

Attermann wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 2:52 pm
I live in Denmark, and get to ride sub zero degrees on/off for about three months, no problem what so ever riding around, I bought an insulated bottle, that works a lot better, and you can also have the bottle on the stomach, bad idea to drink really cold water, and just dress properly, a good base layer and a jacket that can keep the wind out, and some warm gloves.

We have warmer winters sometimes, but then there is a lot of rain instead, I think it’s worse to ride in 2 degrees and rain, than below zero and dry
I would rather ride in blowing snow than rain anywhere near zero C. Cold rain is to the bone, with good gear snow just blows off.
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HammerTime2
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by HammerTime2

I once made the mistake of not being careful enough drinking from a water bottle on a road ride at -6 deg C. A tiny bit of water got on the (unheated) glove finger tips of the index and middle fingers of the hand I held the bottle in. That water froze and those fingers quickly became quite cold. Not fun.

mattr
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by mattr

I've found the same, going from UK winters so Swedish ones, the worst conditions to ride in, irrelevant of what clothing you have is between about -3 and +5 when it's raining or sleeting. Not only is it miserable and all but impossible to keep warm, the road surface can change in a split second.

Colder than that is ok cos it won't rain, it'll snow. Road surface is consistent as well. Above that, you can keep warm even if it rains, and the road surface is good.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

mattr wrote:... the worst conditions to ride in, irrelevant of what clothing you have is between about -3 and +5 when it's raining or sleeting. Not only is it miserable and all but impossible to keep warm, the road surface can change in a split second.

Colder than that is ok cos it won't rain, it'll snow. Road surface is consistent as well. Above that, you can keep warm even if it rains, and the road surface is good.
So true, I would totally go out on a sunny dry day at 0 degrees Celsius, as long as the roads were dry too (no ice). But add moisture to those temps, and things get very uncomfortable very quickly. There’s much better things to be doing in those conditions, like almost anything.
I also find it much harder to drink water and I know you should. But I definitely don’t drink as much as I probably should, or more to the point should have, since I rarely find myself riding in those conditions anymore. I wonder if disc brakes makes it more fun... hmmm... doubt it.
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tymon_tm
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by tymon_tm

Calnago wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:36 pm
I wonder if disc brakes makes it more fun... hmmm... doubt it.
you'd have to warm them up to the point they're red hot and then ride really, really slowly to feel any heat coming from them - and even then I don't think they'd make your butt feel even remotely warmer :beerchug:
Frankie - B wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 2:13 pm
Hasn't that to do with fashion, Tymon? ;)
you mean like girls wearing those thin poshy jackets barely reaching their hips and showing them curves like it's Mallorca? nah... :lol:
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