do you take water when its below freezing?

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Catagory6
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by Catagory6

say you plan to take a 2-hour round-trip stroll to the coffee shop in the next town down the road.
lets say the temps are below freezing.
do you bother to take a bottle?

by Weenie


quadlt250
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by quadlt250

Pro tip: add a nip of bourbon so it doesn't freeze ;)

commendatore
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by commendatore

If it’s below freezing... I stay home.

rajMAN
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by rajMAN

Fill my bottle with boiled water, so it doesn't start out ice cold from the off. :shock: Not in weather below freezing, just cold weather, It does not get below zero much here all winter.

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onemanpeloton
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by onemanpeloton

surely this just depends on whether you sweat at those temperatures. I seem to be able to sweat in any conditions, even freezing, so always take a bottle
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Shrike
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by Shrike

If it's a 'short' ride then I tend not to drink or even take a bottle with me if it's cold (ie anything up to 40 to 50 miles). The problem is longer rides sub-zero at lower pace, where my hands and feet freeze and it's painful to do anything. I do take a bottle but tend not to use it as it's torture to do anything :lol:

Very rare I feel thirsty when it's freezing. I can go 100 miles + and not want a drink. Seems I'm not alone in that either.

Really don't feel like grinding out those painful freezing rides as much this year, even though my own winter kit has improved a lot now through trial and error. Faster rides are fine comfort wise but dangerous. I was looking at footage recently of the missus and I putting the boot down through icy patches of road from a season or two ago. Now I'm thinking how stupid and dangerous that is.

Bit of a tangent but to answer you question.. nope, generally don't drink at all when it's freezing. Can just put the water loss back when home. Also you risk needing to pee and that's brutal for your core body temperature. I've had times when I was going okay until I stopped to pee then never got my core temp back up and suffered for hours after it.

Karvalo
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by Karvalo

Hot coffee :wink: A genuine metal thermos type water bottle is probably the single best purchase I've ever made for winter riding.

Image

Definitely agree with what Shrike said above though - don't drink too much because any time you have to stop moving to pee is an absolute killer for body temp.
Last edited by Karvalo on Fri Nov 23, 2018 1:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

mattr
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by mattr

Catagory6 wrote:
Thu Nov 22, 2018 11:41 pm
say you plan to take a 2-hour round-trip stroll to the coffee shop in the next town down the road.
lets say the temps are below freezing.
do you bother to take a bottle?
Stroll? Nah. Wouldn't bother.

Ride, probably would.
And probably take the bottle into the coffee shop too, warm it up a bit. Or replace the water. Wouldn't expect to drink much of it, maybe a quarter over two hours. Then whatever i drank in the coffee shop.

I take a camelback out on the slopes with me snowboarding. And it can get *really* cold (my record is -40 something, the snow was terrible and a couple of the lifts stopped working) still drank a fair bit. Can usually nearly finish a small bladder in a full day, maybe a litre or so.

Nefarious86
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by Nefarious86

Had never thought of a small Camelback to keep water "warm"
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mattr
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by mattr

Just have to remember to blow the liquid out of the tube every time.
Or it freezes quite quickly (at -40 it was beginning to freeze in the time it took to suck it through the ~50cm of lightly insulated pipe.)

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tymon_tm
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by tymon_tm

winter riding is a whole different kind of thing, first of all - strolls are fine but for riding with my kid and wife. below 0C I find it necessary to keep a steady pace, not too high (don't wan't to sweat too much) not too low (wanna keep myself warm). eating - sure, some gel bars that don't freeze. drinking? never, it's totally counter productive to drink anything colder than your body temp. thermo bottles with hot coffee might work if you really do some heavy or long riding, but for moderate 2h (I hardly ever do longer rides below 5C) I just don't feel like I need it. oh and coffee break when you're all layered up and sweaty - bad idea IMHO
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Jugi
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by Jugi

At about -5 Celsius, CamelBak's insulated Podium bottles actually make a difference in how long water stays liquid. The thin layer of insulation has an effect but as moving liquid doesn't want to freeze, the bottle's valve design is more important as even a small gathering of ice will clog it. In my experience cheap and simple valves are more prone to clogging than complicated ones (ie. CamelBak).

Pro Tip from arctic climate: If you are outside for several hours and want to carry all the liquid you'll need, wear a CamelBak underneath your outer layer clothing and route the hose through your sleeve if possible. Body heat will maintain the liquid's temperature quite high and by drinking from your wrist, there isn't a need to open your jacket for every sip. The valve is the critical point in the system, so that has to be either kept warm or filled with air to prevent freezing. Although CamelBak's valves are quite durable, even the mil spec ones will suffer (and start leaking) if they freeze continously.

Marin
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by Marin

Catagory6 wrote:
Thu Nov 22, 2018 11:41 pm
say you plan to take a 2-hour round-trip stroll to the coffee shop in the next town down the road.
lets say the temps are below freezing.
do you bother to take a bottle?
No need to drink on a 2h ride. Taking it easy you don't need water, and if you're droping the hamer your Glycogen reserves will release water anyway.

AJS914
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by AJS914

Shrike wrote:
Fri Nov 23, 2018 12:11 pm
Really don't feel like grinding out those painful freezing rides as much this year, even though my own winter kit has improved a lot now through trial and error. Faster rides are fine comfort wise but dangerous. I was looking at footage recently of the missus and I putting the boot down through icy patches of road from a season or two ago. Now I'm thinking how stupid and dangerous that is.
This.

I did some winter riding last year. I would only ride if it was at least a little above freezing. If it was sunny, it would feel pretty nice. Even with toe warmers in my shoes (and wool socks and booties), my toes would start to get too cold after 1.5 hours.

I had one nice crash on a sheet of ice (shady section of road where the ice didn't melt).

It was nice to get out but I probably would have built better fitness doing 45 minute sweet spot trainer rides.

by Weenie


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kgt
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by kgt

Riding at freezing temperatures is not a good idea anyway (for your lungs etc.)

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