if could only have one bike what would you buy

Questions about bike hire abroad and everything light bike related. No off-topic chat please

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fromtrektocolnago
Posts: 1004
Joined: Sat Dec 07, 2013 10:15 pm

by fromtrektocolnago

i built up a firefly to a gravel spec 32 mm tires disc. i can use it everywhere. but truth be told i prefer road biking on my dedicated colnago. its the difference between using an all purpose tool versus one built for a specific task
Colnago C-59 (Dura Ace)
Firefly(Ultegra)
Trek 5200(ultegra)

by Weenie


AJS914
Posts: 2112
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

I've been riding my Crux gravel bike all winter. It's actually really fun to ride. With 40mm tires it's so comfortable. We've had some nice days so I switched to my C59 and my first impression was how uncomfortable and hard the ride was. I actually stopped and took 10 psi out of the tires!

The C59 though is so much faster. It's like a Porsche versus a big SUV with soft suspension. An interesting experiment would be faster wheels and tires on my Crux.

bilwit
Posts: 820
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2016 5:49 am
Location: Seattle, WA

by bilwit

No doubt a proper posh road bike is an absolute joy but in my case, there's no way in hell I'm taking it out in the pouring rain every day. I guess if I didn't ride those days then I could live with it just being the one bike but if that were the case then I would never be on the bike because it rains 58% of the year where I live.

Ti disc with full fenders would be the most practical to ride in harsh weather without being too much of a whale, rugged enough to not be too disappointed to crash it, portly enough to not really stand out when I'm just taking it on a short trip, and nice enough for proper cyclists to appreciate.

On a side note, Ti (or hand-built stuff in general I suppose) is extremely expensive for its little niche in the industry--you can get a full build CAAD12 disc with dura ace or a full build Orca disc with ultegra for the same price as just a Ti frame :x

fromtrektocolnago
Posts: 1004
Joined: Sat Dec 07, 2013 10:15 pm

by fromtrektocolnago

If you only plan on staying on roads, i'd avoid the gravel bike. unless you plan on doing both there's little point
Colnago C-59 (Dura Ace)
Firefly(Ultegra)
Trek 5200(ultegra)

AJS914
Posts: 2112
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

bilwit wrote:
Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:19 pm
No doubt a proper posh road bike is an absolute joy but in my case, there's no way in hell I'm taking it out in the pouring rain every day. I guess if I didn't ride those days then I could live with it just being the one bike but if that were the case then I would never be on the bike because it rains 58% of the year where I live.
One bike is just not practical for a serious rider. When I lived in northern CA, just having a single road bike was no problem but, of course, you would miss out on a lot of great mountain biking. It doesn't rain a lot in nor cal so you just don't ride when it rains. Some guys I raced with had a "winter bike" with a heavier wheelset but it was usually their old road bike and they trained on it to keep their new bike in nicer condition.

If you live in Seattle I'm sure you need the fenders or need to just ride the trainer half the time. I'm in Spokane and setting up a fendered winter bike would be a waste of time. We get a big dump of snow and that's it for winter riding unless you want to go for studs or unless the snow melts.

dim
Posts: 223
Joined: Fri Oct 13, 2017 11:25 am
Location: Cambridge UK

by dim

AJS914 wrote:
Fri Feb 09, 2018 9:51 pm
bilwit wrote:
Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:19 pm
No doubt a proper posh road bike is an absolute joy but in my case, there's no way in hell I'm taking it out in the pouring rain every day. I guess if I didn't ride those days then I could live with it just being the one bike but if that were the case then I would never be on the bike because it rains 58% of the year where I live.
One bike is just not practical for a serious rider. When I lived in northern CA, just having a single road bike was no problem but, of course, you would miss out on a lot of great mountain biking. It doesn't rain a lot in nor cal so you just don't ride when it rains. Some guys I raced with had a "winter bike" with a heavier wheelset but it was usually their old road bike and they trained on it to keep their new bike in nicer condition.

If you live in Seattle I'm sure you need the fenders or need to just ride the trainer half the time. I'm in Spokane and setting up a fendered winter bike would be a waste of time. We get a big dump of snow and that's it for winter riding unless you want to go for studs or unless the snow melts.
best post of the day :thumbup:

I have 3 bikes and want 2 more (there's a bike for every occasion) .... I'm hoping to get one of these later this year:

Image
Giant TCR
Canyon Endurace AL
Specialized Allez Sport

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Hellgate
Posts: 99
Joined: Mon Mar 27, 2017 8:49 pm

by Hellgate


dim wrote:I will steer clear of ti ..... too many reports on forums of welds failing
I have to disagree with you here. I've seen numerous old Ti bikes on club rides.

Yes some very light Ti bikes cracked early on, but for the most part it's perhaps the most durable bike material.

My Davidson Ti is 15 years old, maybe 60,000 miles on it and is rock solid.

I'm replacing it this year with a 333fab Ti. Only because I want another road bike.

BTW, Davidson and Kullaway (333fab) are now in the same shop.

http://www.dkcb.us/

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khouse
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Feb 08, 2018 6:58 am

by khouse

My thoughts are I don't want to buy another bike (a ti bike might actually last me 15-25 yrs), plus I also really don't have room and moving is not a option...buying a better bike paying more now will be a kick in the teeth but it'll prevent me from buying more bikes,

I was thinking about the bikesdirect Motobecane Le Champion Team bike, luckily I ride a 48/50 cm frame so it should be the lightest of what they carry...does any one know how much these frames weigh?

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/mot ... .htm#gsize

bilwit
Posts: 820
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2016 5:49 am
Location: Seattle, WA

by bilwit

IMO if you're on a budget you should buy a used bike and then slowly upgrade from there. The cheap Motobecane stuff isn't worth it if you want something you'll want in the long run (in terms of being your pride and joy and only steed). You'd be surprised about what kind of bikes you'll find on ebay or your local craigslist and the like.

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fa63
Posts: 2279
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:26 am
Location: Atlanta, GA, US

by fa63

If I could have only one bike, I would buy a Litespeed Gravel or similar; road like geometry with disc brakes and clearance for 700 X 45 mm or 27.5 X 2.1" MTB tires. Then I would get two sets of wheels.

khouse
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Feb 08, 2018 6:58 am

by khouse

bilwit wrote:
Sat Feb 10, 2018 5:59 am
IMO if you're on a budget you should buy a used bike and then slowly upgrade from there. The cheap Motobecane stuff isn't worth it if you want something you'll want in the long run (in terms of being your pride and joy and only steed). You'd be surprised about what kind of bikes you'll find on ebay or your local craigslist and the like.
is around $850 too much for a Motobecane ti frame?

I don't want to go the used/upgrade route, that's how I ended up with too many bikes random parts and what not which is why everything got tossed after a fight about how much space it took up in the tiny city 1 bedroom apartment. I used to see a lot of stuff in frame sizes that were slightly to large..52-56 which just won't fit

I don't know a ton about higher end bikes but know I'd only buy aluminum and wouldn't know enough to buy used carbon, for the most part I want a light bike (hopefully sub 17.5lbs for a 48 cm ). I know the basic group sets but don't know much about higher end parts such as differences in fork, crank, and wheel sets etc.

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Conza
Posts: 120
Joined: Sat Oct 07, 2017 3:28 am
Location: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Contact:

by Conza

The one I currently have...

Image

But with DA rotors, calipers, and Dura Ace, plus power metre.

Nearly there.

=======

Can commute on it, wet weather if necessary, but mostly for riding hard and long.
It's all about the adventure :o .


KaiLingMan64
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2018 9:14 am

by KaiLingMan64

I'll definitely would get a lightish Titanium Disc Brake with clearance for at least 32mm tyres.

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by Weenie


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fa63
Posts: 2279
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:26 am
Location: Atlanta, GA, US

by fa63

bilwit wrote:The cheap Motobecane stuff isn't worth it if you want something you'll want in the long run (in terms of being your pride and joy and only steed).
While the name doesn’t have the cache of the premium brands, my Motobecane has been one of the best bikes I have owned in the last few years. This one is 5 years old now, but still looks and rides as good as it did on day one. I like it so much that I kept it over a Seven.

Here it is in gravel mode; long reach brakes allow using up to 40 mm tires. My only gripe is that the frame is not disc compatible.

Image

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