2018 PRO thread

Questions about bike hire abroad and everything light bike related. No off-topic chat please

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nathanong87
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by nathanong87

waltthizzney wrote:
Sun Feb 18, 2018 6:56 am
Is this actually real? Tim Wellens claiming he is doing 517w for 10 minutes at 65KG? No Way

https://www.facebook.com/TimWellens199/ ... 2682709745
lol this graph looks like it was made in excel 1998

CrankAddictsRich wrote:
Sun Feb 18, 2018 1:30 am

They had a video a few weeks ago, asking a bunch of the pros about their stem length and angle and Blythe's comment was, "I didn't choose the stem, the stem chose me."
haha i forget who it was , but they said 'if i would have made the change back then (in reference to adding 10mm) i would have won the TDF 3x' hahahaha.

wingguy
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by wingguy

Nefarious86 wrote:
Sun Feb 18, 2018 11:05 am
The higher you go the further behind the BB you get, not forward.
Thanks Captain Obvious. I said the effective seat tube angle gets steeper on that particular bike the more seatpost is exposed. It’s a different concept.

Look at the frame design - the seattube curves back around the wheel to a certain point, then straightens up and sets the seatpost at an angle much closer to vertical than the straight line from top of post to B.B. On bikes like this the stated seattube angle applies only to one specific saddle height, somewhere near the middle of the intended range of fit. With the saddle any lower the effective STA is slacker, with the saddle any higher the effective STA is steeper. Blythes saddle is quite high, so in practice the STA of his bike is going to be significantly steeper than 72.5 degrees. Comparable to or possibly even steeper than the Tarmac, certainly quite different to what you think the geo chart comparison tells you.

Any other questions? :wink:

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LouisN
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by LouisN

Let's put it more simply, or as Blythe said himself: "I like to use a size smaller".

LOuis :)

simoncx
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by simoncx

Blythe get disqualified for irregular bike change, what a bunch of bs. So the team car is allowed to go up the road and get the bike ready but because the mechanic gave him the new bike from the side of the road it's a dq? What were they suppose to do get the bike ready drive 5 ft holding it out the window and then do a bike change?

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/blythe- ... ke-change/

djcharlou
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by djcharlou

Nice stage ending at Algavre today ! Sad for Stybar but nice trainning for next week i guess

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Re Blythe's Disqualification...
Ok... since no one else is going to comment, I suppose I will.

First of all, disc brakes are great... if you like 'em, ride 'em.
But in the pro peloton, there are more disadvantages than advantages, the main disadvantage illustrated very well here... disqualification due to complications arising from disc brake usage. Basically, that's what it was... he needed a bike change... but his team needed extra time to "set up" his bike due to the disc brake factor (really?... putting on a front wheel?).
So, in this case he was disqualified for an "irregular bike change", but it would never have occurred if it wasn't for the extra time the team needed to get his bike ready for a quick change, causing them to get permission to go ahead, then faff about with putting a wheel on, a front wheel no less I have to presume, then screw up with the technicalities of the actual handoff. So, too bad for Blythe... but in the heat of the moment when there's a real risk of never catching back onto the peloton if you get behind (hell if I'd wait for someone that got behind becasue they couldn't get their wheel to cooperate, or took too long to do a wheel change... so sad, too bad, see ya), then I can see being really upset if the reason a race or stage, or several places in a stage was lost because of that. D'oh... dis would never have happened with my old rim brake bike... Dammit! So, the potential disadvantage is quite large to an indiviudal rider, for sure.

Now, the advantage. It boils down to one reason, one word... MARKETING! The manufacturers need to show discs in the peloton. Becasue that sells bikes. And at the end of day, it's the only reason they are there. Very very simple.

So, there you have it in a nutshell. Discs are really an anomaly for the high end road bike market because at the highest levels of racing they're kind of a non-starter with more downsides than upsides, yet for the average consumer buying bikes, they may very well be the next best thing since anything. But marketing is all about showing the latest wares in the sexiest light possible, and that, is the pro peloton. So, marketing wins, at the expense of maybe a few individual pro racers who get caught out by a "complication due to disc usage" here and there.

Actually, maybe all they really meant by "irregular bike change", was that blythes bike is just so "irregular" that they wanted to throw it out of the peloton.

Ok... it was said... it won't change anything I know... but it needed to be said, nonetheless.
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tymon_tm
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by tymon_tm

+1 totally agree with the disc angle. I'll say it again - every complication introduced to pro bikes will sooner or later result in someone losing a bike race. imagine F1 introduces a feature that makes drivers DNF, but marketing dept. claims it's gonna "sell cars" - well, you can't because no one's stupid enough to jeopardise drivers' health, performance and product's sales itself (how can one even think of endorsing something that doesn't work properly?). in case of pro cycling, all this is secondary issue - the first order of business is to make people want to change their bikes. for me it does the opposite - after seeing what happens to pros, I can't imagine ditching mechanical groupset or rim brakes.
Calnago wrote:
Sun Feb 18, 2018 7:46 pm

Actually, maybe all they really meant by "irregular bike change", was that blythes bike is just so "irregular" that they wanted to throw it out of the peloton.
:twisted: :lol:
kkibbler wrote: WW remembers.

mentok
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by mentok

I feel like whether the new bike were a rim brake bike or a disc bike the team would have wanted to go ahead to prepare for the swap to avoid the additional delay of having to fit the front wheel after stopping. I think they probably would have done the swap in exactly the same manner in either case.

Problem with the rules, not the technology imho. Fix the rules or force everyone to use discs so everyone has the same conditions to deal with :twisted:

AJS914
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by AJS914

So what were they supposed to do? Ride ahead, put the front wheel on, put the bike back in the car and then do a normal bike change?

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Calnago
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by Calnago

If team cars were allowed to just move through and ahead of the peloton whenever one of their riders were in need of a new bike, then imagine what chaos that would cause as team cars pushed their way through, honking at riders to move over so they could go ahead and work on their troubled riders bike before he got there? Yeah, that would be a great rule change.
What were they supposed to do? What they would normally do... rider with a mechanical would drop back to get a new bike from the team car. He could sit down, have a coffee, muffin too maybe, while the mechanics try to get a wheel on his bike. Then chase back to the peloton. Maybe with the help of some of his team mates who stayed back to help, but really just wanted a muffin break.
I really hope it doesn't come down to the peloton being "forced" to ride disc brakes. Choose your weapons wisely. It's a race.
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simoncx
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by simoncx

I think the problem is they were given permission to go ahead and get the bike ready because they couldn't get a fully built bikes on the cars, the racks they have at the race do not support a fully built bikes.

Wookski
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by Wookski

Kwiato showing some early season form as usual- looking strong.

spdntrxi
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by spdntrxi

simoncx wrote:
Mon Feb 19, 2018 12:33 am
I think the problem is they were given permission to go ahead and get the bike ready because they couldn't get a fully built bikes on the cars, the racks they have at the race do not support a fully built bikes.
that is the teams problem... get racks that can do it.

AJS914
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by AJS914

The article made it sound like that is what was provided in Oman. They obviously aren't shipping their regular team cars over.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

That’s true, the racks provided did not carry a complete bike. One wheel (presumably the front) had to be off. Hmmm... perhaps they should have brought bikes that their mechanics could install a front wheel on quickly.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

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