The unmistakable sign of a connoisseur in 2015?

Questions about bike hire abroad and everything light bike related. No off-topic chat please

Moderator: Moderator Team

User avatar
Stats
Posts: 1112
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2007 12:28 pm
Location: Australia

by Stats

- Gum sidewall tubular tyres
- Downtube shifters & toe straps
- Leather or cotton bar tape

User avatar
kkibbler
Posts: 852
Joined: Tue Sep 09, 2014 9:30 am

by kkibbler

Stats wrote:- Gum sidewall tubular tyres
- Downtube shifters & toe straps
- Leather or cotton bar tape

A preference for traditionalism does not equal connoisseurship.

by Weenie


dbecks7
Posts: 215
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2006 3:00 am

by dbecks7

Pro level tenderloins is the ultimate sign of a connoisseur

Image

uraqt
Posts: 858
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 8:53 am

by uraqt

Owns a Silca product.

Rodrego Hernandez
Posts: 1229
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2005 7:11 pm
Location: Out there

by Rodrego Hernandez

uraqt wrote:Owns a Silca product.



An original, not one of the new american ones :wink:

RyanH
Moderator
Posts: 2266
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 4:01 pm
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Contact:

by RyanH

I think, at the most basic level, a connoisseur in cycling is a person that carefully selects his or her components based on need, which will vary from cyclist to cyclist. For example, when one chooses eeBrakes over THM Fibulas, outside of the price difference and concerns of fragility, it takes a level of understanding of the subtle differences between the two products and how they will help meet the needs of the user. On the other hand, kitting your entire bike in Enve, Zipp or what not only means you are a consumerist, not a connoisseur.

I also think it's independent of how fast one is, because I know many "go fast kids" that have little respect for any aspect of cycling that doesn't involve winning.

I think it takes a connoisseur to spot one, because it's strictly in the little things. A perfectly maintained, noise-free bike may be one of the few telltale signs, because everything else may vary from person to person based on needs but that one is universal.

While I am a lover of fine things, I am probably not a connoisseur of cycling since I'd rather spend my weekend duking it out with a bunch of wannabe pros than spend time cycling around, and enjoying, the gorgeous mountains we have in Southern CA.

Oh, and those who knock those that ride carbon tubs all the time either a) don't live in California/Florida or b) are jealous of those that do due to cost reasons or otherwise. Wheels are meant to be ridden and enjoyed and carbon tubulars are the epitome of that -- they are light, stiff and comfortable (in the shallow varieties). They are also pretty damn durable. I spent a lot of time beating the shit out of my DV46's on gravel and fireroads without even a slight loss of true. Further, I can usually swap a flatted tub faster than many of my cycling buddies spend dicking around with their clinchers (granted, it is time to go home for me at that point, but still). Last time I timed it around 7 minutes. Lastly, I know 4 people that have gone down due to a blown clincher. I had a razor take out my rear wheel doing 30 in a sweeping turn and I safely came to a stop. That would have ended much differently if I were on clinchers.

Vagabond
Posts: 340
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2011 2:08 am
Location: The Washingtons: DC and the state

by Vagabond

Rodrego Hernandez wrote:
uraqt wrote:Owns a Silca product.



An original, not one of the new american ones :wink:


When I'm home on the West Coast I have a 27 year old yellow Silca Classic pump to inflate my tires. When on the East Coast at work I have the new American one. Expensive? You bet. But glorious and worth every penny. On topic, a connoisseur to me is one who clearly rides a lot. Fit with a nice position and a time honed pedal stroke. They're always the ones with an easy smile and wave and an extra CO2 or spare tube on them. They're also the ones simply grateful to be out on the road. It doesn't matter what material their frame is made of or where their shifters are located. But they do seem to have an instinctive understanding of the Velominati's approach to cycling. :D
Colnago e Campagnolo

User avatar
hjb1000
Posts: 257
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 10:25 am
Location: Australia

by hjb1000

tymon_tm wrote:IMO a connoisseur would be someone who greatly values function over form. someone, who doesn't fall for every season novelty in gear, just because they land on the shop shelves. someone, who doesn't give a f*** about what others think of him or what they ride - cause he rides his bike for himself, not to show off at the sunday 9am doctors group ride. it's someone who still uses some ancient (to the Rapha crowd) gear - like alu Cosmic Carbones or DA 7800, and most importantly - an old helmet. like the first Stradivarius. and he never complains and grumples like an idiot about his gear; if something doesn't work for him - he changes it, plain and simple. you see this guy on a bike and you automatically feel something that is a mix of fear and respect. he'll most likely drop you after a short chat and 'meh' all your bike kit remarks. that sort of dude is a rare breed these days, but can be easily spotted in a crowd of 10k Pina-lawyers and custom-build-me-anything-more-bling douches who won't even ride their bike unless it's warm and sunny 8)


This.

I would also add:

-Not being stupidly limited by one brand of groupset, and will happily run mixed groupsets to get the best performance or bang for buck- ie you'll run a SRAM Red crankset and cassette with DA9000 and not give a shit.

-Someone with fenders on their bike instantly gains respect in my book. It means they actually ride their bike in the rain.

-Well worn white handlebar tape

User avatar
Wingnut
Posts: 1909
Joined: Sat Jun 23, 2007 12:41 am

by Wingnut

Rodrego Hernandez wrote:
uraqt wrote:Owns a Silca product.



An original, not one of the new american ones :wink:


Damn...I've only got a 20yr old HPX on my bike... :(
"It's not the destination...it's the ride!"

Bogan
Posts: 261
Joined: Tue Feb 11, 2014 11:47 pm
Location: Boganville, Australia

by Bogan

Rodrego Hernandez wrote:
uraqt wrote:Owns a Silca product.



An original, not one of the new american ones :wink:


I have had a look at one of the new American Silca pumps. It is a work of art, but outside my price bracket. I will stick with my 25 year old battered red Silca track pump. Still going strong!
MAMIL? Never. O.F.I.L. yeh! (Old F**ker in Lycra)

sawyer
Posts: 4512
Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2006 7:45 pm
Location: Natovi Landing

by sawyer

Having reflected on this whole subject (at length) I still feel the presence of tubulars is one of the true connoisseur's calling cards
----------------------------------------
Stiff, Light, Aero - Pick Three!! :thumbup:

bfno
Posts: 281
Joined: Sun Apr 13, 2014 2:09 am

by bfno

hjb1000 wrote:-Not being stupidly limited by one brand of groupset, and will happily run mixed groupsets to get the best performance or bang for buck- ie you'll run a SRAM Red crankset and cassette with DA9000 and not give a shit.


Sorry but morally I cannot agree with this.
Venge | Shiv TT | Langster | Dogma 60.1 | CruX | Aeroad CF SLX (WIP)

Bogan
Posts: 261
Joined: Tue Feb 11, 2014 11:47 pm
Location: Boganville, Australia

by Bogan

Has my moral compass gone astray? Shimano mech with Lightning cranks? :lol:
MAMIL? Never. O.F.I.L. yeh! (Old F**ker in Lycra)

nobuseri
Posts: 249
Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2015 12:20 am

by nobuseri

Wow; I guess I can sum it up and say I am not hardcore enough. :roll:

For me, that's OK. :beerchug:

I like to cycle - preferably in a group faster than me so I can play "don't lose that wheel." I love the challenge. I like to train in the same fashion - or alone.

I don't wear team kits, but have been known to buy a few pro jerseys. I like them partially for the design, but mainly so I can be seen on the road as I think the mix of colors helps catch driver vision. I could care less about the brand names stamped on them. I buy what's on sale and mainly what I can afford. This also makes cycling enjoyable for me.

I also like to do centuries (with climbing). I like to just get out there and ride with other folks, talk about cycling passions and enjoy the outdoors.

I also like to work on my own bikes. I don't build wheels, but I ride hand spun wheelsets. I just have them built to my spec/preference. I have been known to tear down a bike or two and build them back up with different parts/specs. I like to try different parts for myself and come to my own conclusions. This also keeps me interested in the sport/hobby.

I like to ride for fun - AND train. Just depends on the people/group I am riding with. I make time for both as it keeps me interested in the sport/hobby. I do crits, occasionally. Migrating towards road racing at the moment.

I have been known to ride carbon clinchers/tubulars daily. I also try to strengthen myself (mentally) in riding in conditions colder than my comfort level.

Been riding for years. I would say I have built a taste for some things and not others. I would say I have become a connoisseur in my own right, as I have developed a certain level of knowledge/passion/etc for what I enjoy doing.

The way some of you guys make it seem, if we were talking about coffee, we would have to have our own farms and grow/pick/roast our own damn beans to get points - and that wouldn't even be enough. :roll:

If I buy a bike at a LBS that has been built with 90% of the parts would have built it with yourself, I don't think that's a basis for losing connoisseur points. Being a connoisseur (to me) means having a taste/preference for a certain thing based on your past experience/knowledge. If that doesn't fit your definition, I think we can all agree it's highly subjective, at the very least. That's what makes this forum readable and fun for me.

My $0.02
Last edited by nobuseri on Tue Jun 09, 2015 2:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Cicli Barco XCr Road
Moots VaMoots
Parlee Z1
SuperX Hi-Mod Disc

uraqt
Posts: 858
Joined: Mon Apr 03, 2006 8:53 am

by uraqt

Wingnut wrote:
Rodrego Hernandez wrote:
uraqt wrote:Owns a Silca product.



An original, not one of the new american ones :wink:


Damn...I've only got a 20yr old HPX on my bike... :(



Sorry nope only 40 year old pumps count : )

by Weenie


Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post