New Colnago V1R

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DartanianX
Posts: 498
Joined: Sun Nov 13, 2011 6:00 am

by DartanianX

Brakes mounted by the BB mean a few things,
1… They can reduce the amount of carbon the use to make the seat stays stiff enough to handle braking.
2… The seat stays can now be tuned to provide a more supple ride as they no longer have to handle braking forces.

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by Weenie


Franklin
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Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 11:09 am

by Franklin

So they are through their stock of C59 tubes => C60.
M10S becomes V1R

Okay I guess....

ph
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Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 8:36 am

by ph

Surprised Colnago kept the seat stay bridge when using brakes under the BB. I prefer approach of the new Trek and Canyon Aeroroad CF SLX with seat stay mounted direct mount brakes (which I thought were supposed to be a better brake design and more aero - but to be proven).

I'm not against disc brakes but would see out of place to me on an aero bike.

In any event, I like seeing new frame platforms.

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kgt
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by kgt

Most boring Colnago ever...

bikewithnoname
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by bikewithnoname

Like your thinking kbbpll, my ’92 Kona had a u-brake under the chain stay, terrible idea in terms of maintenance and attracting crud (even more so for a mountain bike)

Overall it doesn’t really appeal for the price, I’d still rather have a C59 over this or a C60
"We live in an age when unnecessary things are our only necessities." Oscar Wilde

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CXTony
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by CXTony

Looks like Colnago just wants a me-too "aero" bike for the market - as others pointed out, nothing new or especially unique. I wonder what Ferrari did other than slap a decal on the frame.

Franklin
Posts: 400
Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 11:09 am

by Franklin

CXTony wrote:Looks like Colnago just wants a me-too "aero" bike for the market - as others pointed out, nothing new or especially unique. I wonder what Ferrari did other than slap a decal on the frame.
It's marketing. But that said:

They could have run some cad in their sparetime. They certainly have the programs to simulate these things. But if F1 knowledge translates to better aerodynamics for a bike? Who knows.

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stella-azzurra
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by stella-azzurra

Is the brake under the BB worse or better for wet road conditions? :lol:
I never took drugs to improve my performance at any time. I will be willing to stick my finger into a polygraph test if anyone with big media pull wants to take issue. If you buy a signed poster now it will not be tarnished later. --Graeme Obree

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Mockenrue
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by Mockenrue

I have a mate who rides a Trek Madone 7.9 with Dura Ace which has the rear brake down below. Prior to that he had one of the preceding models with the conventional setup and he says there's no discernable difference in braking feel or performance, wet or dry. He isn't the most experienced road rider I know but he's quite particular about his bikes.

From an aesthetic perspective it's a disaster IMO. His bike just looks wrong when viewed from behind, but I'll reserve judgement on the V1-R until I actually see one. Colnagos always seem to look much better in the flesh than in a lot of photos (as do many other bikes of course.)

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Calnago
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by Calnago

If it's a caliper brake as far as stopping power goes, it really doesn't matter where on the rim the calipers are squeezing. What does matter to how it feels is the brake itself and the mounts. Also, and this is no small part of the equation is how smooth are the cable run is from the levers to the brake itself. I don't how to copy the image of the underside of the BB in the BikeRadar piece, but go back and have a look at the convoluted mess of cable run and short tight bends and there's even an adjuster down there (so you can reach down while riding and tweak it no doubt LOLOL). So, even if the brake calipers were identical, and the mounts were the same, it's still a nightmare to work on, it's exposed more to stuff being thrown at it from the front wheel (not just the back), and it's just plain awful. Sorry I can't come up with a better description, but "awful" seems to work. I should say that this isn't a commentary on just this bike, but any bike that has this awful awful design.

Did I mention I think this is an awful design?

Not much can beat a standard Shimano Duraace or Campy Record brake caliper for sheer simplicity and performance and ease to work on.

Does anyone really, I mean really... believe they will be faster due to the added aeroness of having their rear brake in such an awful place. Stop the madness. Lol.

Sorry, I haven't had dinner yet. And happy hour just started. :beerchug:
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stella-azzurra
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by stella-azzurra

I think the brake near the bottom bracket will get caked with road grime more so that it being on the seat stays. Now if they incorporate the brake as part of the chain stays I'd go with that.
I never took drugs to improve my performance at any time. I will be willing to stick my finger into a polygraph test if anyone with big media pull wants to take issue. If you buy a signed poster now it will not be tarnished later. --Graeme Obree

DartanianX
Posts: 498
Joined: Sun Nov 13, 2011 6:00 am

by DartanianX

I have a Trek Madone with the BB mounted brake. The only gripe I have with the whole thing is changing pads, as the chain rings get in the way of the pad holder bolt. That's all.
I've ridden in some pretty horrific conditions and haven't had any issues with any accumulation of road grime and crap. Regular bike washing might be the saving grace there.

In saying this, as we are sponsored by SRAM I do welcome a third party direct mount brake caliper, as the Bontrager one is rather lacking power wise, and running Shimano is a big no no.

I do agree having the quick release in line under the BB is a silly place to have it. Much smarter to have it in line by the bars, or build one in to the cable stop like the Madone's have.

Just to clarify, I am a trek sponsored athlete.

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Franklin
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Joined: Mon Aug 04, 2008 11:09 am

by Franklin

Does anyone really, I mean really... believe they will be faster due to the added aeroness of having their rear brake in such an awful place.
Not much to believe... if it's really more aero it will be faster. No shades of grey there.

The real question is: does this miniscule gain outweigh reduced funtionality?

Running Shimano is a big no no.
Why not? It's not as if anyone would find out.

5 8 5
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by 5 8 5

stella-azzurra wrote:I think the brake near the bottom bracket will get caked with road grime more so that it being on the seat stays.
I thought the same until recently. A mate has a custom Ti frame with the rear brake under the chainstays.
On a recent ride it started raining quite heavily on the return leg. Some of the country roads had a lot of mud on them from tractors, cattle etc. After the ride we compared brakes and I was extremely surprised to see that his brake was dirty but mine was much dirtier in comparison. Obviously not a true test but none the less surprising.


Mockenrue wrote:From an aesthetic perspective it's a disaster IMO. His bike just looks wrong when viewed from behind
Have it a agree. it just looks weird. It would look better with the brake bridge.

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HammerTime2
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by HammerTime2

Franklin wrote:But if F1 knowledge translates to better aerodynamics for a bike? Who knows.
Yes, when you start riding your bike 250 to 300 km/hour.

by Weenie


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