Can a lackluster season be attributed to the bike???

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HUMP DIESEL
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by HUMP DIESEL

I know this is a crazy topic, but I was just thinking about Gilbert and how he had the dominant season before last year and since then we have seen not a lot from him other than winning the worlds.
I like looking at bikes, and I was looking at what he was on compared to what he is on now, and although contact points may be the same, the difference between his Canyon that he basically rode like a motorcycle and the BMC are significant. The main thing is that the Canyon was a bigger bike. I am wondering if this could be some part of why he is not riding better.
Long stretch I know, but he looked crazy strong on the Canyon.

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prendrefeu
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by prendrefeu

I think there are other factors at play: team dynamics, injuries, luck, personal life issues (these can have a significant effect on performance), expectations, etc:.

But playing along:
Boonen 2009 - Specialized - great season
Boonen 2010 - Merckx - lackluster
Boonen 2011 - Merckx - lackluster
Boonen 2012 - Specialized - great season

I think comparisons in this sort of analysis are best with one-day/classics type riders. Sprinters and GC types are a bit more dependent on the strength of the team by comparison.
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HUMP DIESEL
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by HUMP DIESEL

prendrefeu,
That is what I was talking about in one aspect, but I was also thinking of the actual performance aspect of the bike size. He seemed to be one with the Canyon at the larger size, now it seems that with the smaller BMC, he struggles to get it to go.

I know there are other factors, but just a small observation based off his past performances. When he attacked in other races, it looked as if he was shot out of a rocket, now, it looks like he is stuck in mud.

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petepeterson
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by petepeterson

He looked pretty good at this moment....

Image

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prendrefeu
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by prendrefeu

Andy Schleck - really good - on a Specialized Tarmac, 56
Andy Schleck - decent after injury recovery - on a Trek Madone 58
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HUMP DIESEL
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by HUMP DIESEL

He looked better when he beat the Schleck brothers and also Scarponi on the Canyon. I am not advocated one bike over the other, more size of bike between the two. I think he started out on a bigger BMC if I am not mistaken, and now he is on a very small BMC with a long stem. We had the discussion about how J. Huang seemed to not like the long stem I think.

HUMP
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HUMP DIESEL
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by HUMP DIESEL

Here is the actual quote: Another common pro trend perpetuated here is the undersized frame. Despite standing at 1.83m (6ft) tall, Gilbert rides a rather diminutive 50cm frame with a 535mm effective top tube length – something no fitter in their right mind would do for a typical cyclist of the same height.

As usual, though, it's all about head tube length for these guys. In this case, the top of Gilbert's bar sits more than 12cm below the top of his saddle. To get the reach he wants, Gilbert then has to run a 140mm-long stem slammed atop the headset.

Sure, the extreme position looks way cool, and the 'SLAMYOURSTEM' kids would worship the ground you roll on. But let's be realistic here – you're not Philippe Gilbert, and twice-daily Ashtanga yoga sessions and a closet full of Lululemon probably aren't going to get you there, either. But if you're 1.79m tall with a rockin' Euro fauxhawk and still think you can pull this off, go on and try – we dare you. Let us know how things went after your resulting chiropractor appointment.
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stella-azzurra
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by stella-azzurra

I think you are speaking from a 50ish point of view. :lol: :lol:

Pros will almost always ride a smaller frame.
They are relatively younger.
They have relatively more flexibility compared to someone that does not ride the bike as job.

I am sure they have tried many different configurations during training before they step to the line for a race.

Honestly I do not see bike size as the reason they had a good or bad season.

Gilbert is not going to say to the media or to anyone for that matter: You know last year that bike was waaay too big for me....

Is there a deeper question of self validation you are trying to answer? :oops: :lol:

Just being an ass :lol:
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HUMP DIESEL
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by HUMP DIESEL

50ish?? I am 38.

Not trying to validate anything, just observation and thought.

ASS? You or me?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjYGuL89vAo

Check this out. His 2011 highlights.

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prendrefeu
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by prendrefeu

I believe it is an interesting question (almost assertion, but we're still at the question phase) -

Does having a smaller frame and subsequent geometry create a significant impact on a [classics-type] rider's racing qualities?
With the continuation that the racing qualities lend to that rider's methods of producing results.
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AGW
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by AGW

http://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=113966

I explored his position between the two bikes. Nothing conclusive here, but his position doesn't appear to be that different between his Canyon and his BMC. Of course, the results tell a story, that could be down to a team change. Lotto was pretty successful with him and Boonen and everyone else. in contrast BMC seems to struggle with success despite the impressive roster.

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by kulivontot

No.

sawyer
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by sawyer

HUMP - I had this thought about PG a year or so ago, and wasn't just trying to ramp the value of Canyon's before selling mine :-)

Maybe also the hoops ... he had CCUs for the punchclimbs back in the day ... not floppy Eastons.
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HUMP DIESEL
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by HUMP DIESEL

AGW - I was not speaking in terms of his position, but more the way the smaller bike will handle/feel than the bigger bike. Contact points can be the same for both, but the bikes ride totally different.

A good article here on this very same thing, in terms of a Colnago. Notice how the person talks about how each bike fit him, but the one rode better and worked better.
http://www.bikesportmichigan.com/reviews/colnago.shtml

HUMP
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euan
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by euan

sawyer wrote:Maybe also the hoops ... he had CCUs for the punchclimbs back in the day ... not floppy Eastons.


Which is why they are on Shimano this year...
"Step forward the climber and all those who worship at the altar of lightness" - R. Millar

by Weenie


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