Do I don't I TT Bike.

Questions about bike hire abroad and everything light bike related. No off-topic chat please

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welkman
Posts: 188
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2012 10:47 am

by welkman

As I have posted elsewhere, I am starting TTing next season. It will be my sole 'racing' target and all other rides will be long sportives and possibly a trip to the Alps. On my club ride today I was told that if I wanted to be competitive I need a tt rig. The thing is I don't know if I'm going to like it, or be any good (i really want to like it). I have looked for a cheap frame or bike but cant seem to find anything, even scouring ebay and the classifieds. Im not confident on sizing a tt frame so I figure that a Chinese frame is a silly idea? What do I need to look for in a tt frame? Should I do a few races on my road bike and then see if I want to take the plunge? Should I buy and build a Chinese carbon frame? Am I really going to notice the difference ? So many questions. What do you think?

Cheers

W

weeshuggy
Posts: 65
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2011 4:59 pm

by weeshuggy

IMO it's not gonna be worth it unless you are doin 22 mins for a ten miles TT regularly.

I'd say ride a few, then make an honest judgement of weather a TT bike will be worth it...

CarlosFerreiro
Posts: 304
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 1:41 pm
Location: Shetland, Scotland

by CarlosFerreiro

The big gains in the first season are going to be from position and getting used to riding the whole way at your limit in that position and holding good pacing, so you really just need a frame that lets you get into the best position.
Ribble have an alloy TT frame for £125 that meets the basic need. Then see i) if you like TTing ii) what size of frame actually fits your position.

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geedawg
Posts: 183
Joined: Tue May 18, 2010 6:07 am

by geedawg

Here's a breakdown of what a TT frame might get you.

http://www.bikeradar.com/road/gear/arti ... ero-19273/

It's not anywhere near as sophisticated an analysis as some on this board can give, but it's a good basic start.

Dozer
Posts: 70
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2012 10:43 am

by Dozer

If you really aren't sure if TT'ing is something you want to do, then just get a forward bend seatpost and aerobars for your road bike and give it a try. Also, a skin suit would help if you race. What wheels do you have?

If you like it the try to find a turnkey TT bike on ebay. Better to get a cheaper frame and good aero wheels if you have to make compromises. The main advantage of a TT bike is putting you in the correct position for low drag without compromising your power output. At that point an aero helmet might help.

TT'ing isn't for everyone. Better to get out there and see if you like it before dropping a bunch of cash on a bike.

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kgt
Posts: 6779
Joined: Sun Jun 18, 2006 10:29 am
Location: Athens, Greece

by kgt

Dozer wrote:TT'ing isn't for everyone. Better to get out there and see if you like it before dropping a bunch of cash on a bike.

+1

aerozy
Posts: 778
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:48 am
Location: Mountains, Portugal

by aerozy

TT'ing is definetely not all fun and games. Personally I dont see the point in having a good TT bike if you dont have a good FTP. I personally invested in a good TT bike without really thinking. I see now it was an unjustified investment. I later realized my legs didnt really justify a 5000£ tt rig. Ive since focused a lot of my training on working on my FTP and I have improved a lot. So what I am basically saying is go one step at a time. Get some aerobars and perhaps setup your roadbike for yout TT position. Work on your FTP and see how you go.

Down the line if you see you are having fun and are competitive then investing in equipment will pay dividends. At my FTP I gain 4-5km/h with my TT rig compared to my road bike. So aerodynamics does count a lot!
Sunny cycling holidays in Portugal @ Cherry Cottage Vintage B&B

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Marzz
Posts: 120
Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2011 1:19 am

by Marzz

My mates got me in to it and I love it!

Being on my tt does make me love my roadie so much more tho.
S-Works Venge

Dozer
Posts: 70
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2012 10:43 am

by Dozer

I think TT'ing is fun. Monday night TT's were my favorite ride I the week. It was actually a good group ride because people didn't have to worry about getting dropped because of FTP or not having a super aero bike.

Try it. If you enjoy it, don't worry if you are fast or not. The only time that matters is yours. It's fun to watch that number drop week after week and year after year as you get better and your bike gets faster.

My FTP now is nothing like it was 15 years go. But, that doesn't mean I don't like to TT. Unfortunately, where I live I have found a road with light enough traffic to feel safe TT'ing. I have to say I miss it quite a lot.

welkman
Posts: 188
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2012 10:47 am

by welkman

Well I am going to follow a training plan from now until march focused on TT results. I would love to do more traditional racing but the only way into it is through TT around here! I will take advice on getting some aero bars and possibly a forward bend post and then work on my position.

I love pushing myself to the limit on normal rides and really enjoy the competitive aspect of riding so Im sure I will love TTing. Its just a bit difficult to understand how people manage to knock out 22 or 23 mins on a normal roadbike? I cant see me getting faster than 24mph average over that time but then I have never really done an all out effort.

Cheers

W

aerozy
Posts: 778
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:48 am
Location: Mountains, Portugal

by aerozy

welkman wrote:I cant see me getting faster than 24mph average over that time but then I have never really done an all out effort.


Consider getting a powermeter and train loads in your FTP zone.
Sunny cycling holidays in Portugal @ Cherry Cottage Vintage B&B

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