Anyone still have a steel bike?

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thedanplasse
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by thedanplasse

The good thing is the main reason I wanted to upgrade is to let the wife use it who's a tad shorter, but with the same inseam as me. But I'd be lying if I said it wasn't also for my enjoyment too.

I've wanted to get a larger frame because I've suspected the same thing. (Jealous of how familiar everyone is and how they can pin point everything from a single picture). I raised the saddle because I felt the frame may be a tad small. I haven't yet messed with saddle angle though. This is mostly from the previous owner's preference. (except the bars which I've already messed up apparently, lol)
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Calnago
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by Calnago

One thing that will help a lot in your learning process is to realize that raising or lowering the saddle will almost always accompany a simultaneous adjustment to the fore aft saddle position along the rails in order to maintain a nicely balanced position on the bike. For example, raising the saddle will likely require a bit of forward adjustment on the fore/aft position as well, and vice versa for lowering it... will likely require a bit of rearward adjustment. It’s a trial and error process of finding the right balance for you. But try not to let the bars play too much of a factor in your saddle position. What I mean by that is, if your bars are too close to you there will be a natural tendency to push yourself more rearward that warranted and if the bars were too far out, there would be a natural tendency for you to be pulled towards them, affecting where your optimal saddle position might otherwise be.
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by Weenie


thedanplasse
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by thedanplasse

I think I'll fiddle around with that tonight when I get home. I do find myself sliding towards the front of the saddle, Maybe tilting the saddle a bit up, and foreward would help. I'll also try tilting the bars down to orient the hoods better.

Thank you,
I do appreciate it.
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ianeire
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by ianeire

You have to fix those handlebars. Rotate the bars forwards until the bottom of the drops is parallel with the ground. This will put the shifters in completely the wrong place for the time being because they are mounted much too low on the bars. Once you have the bars in position you need to unwrap the bartape as far as the shifter, loosen the shifter and move it up the bar until it's in a spot that you like, and then wrap the bars again. Ultimately you may not like it, but it's free and it's worth a try. With the bars and shifters in the correct place the drops will be easier to reach, and, trying to visualise it, maybe there will be a little less reach to the hoods.

See my bars here - ignore my shifter position as these are old style bars where the shifters mount to a specific threaded hole on the bars, so I only have one position for them.

Image

thedanplasse
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by thedanplasse

Will do. Visualizing it seems like the bars will be tilted too far foreward, but if thats where they're supposed to be I'll give it a go. Mine don't seem to be as curved as most?
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ianeire
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by ianeire

Agreed, but as above, you can't do the bars without subsequently moving the shifters too. If you don't do the shifters they'll be unreachable with the bars in the 'right' place. By rotating the bars the drops will be closer and easier to reach, and you have to pull back the rubber hoods to access the shifter mounting bolt, loosen, shimmy back up the bars until they're in your preferred position again, and tighten them up.

There's nothing wrong with the shape of your bars, they're just ergonomic instead of a classic D. With everything in the right place it should look similar to this pic. Your shifters are currently mounted on that first kink below the hoods.
Image

thedanplasse
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by thedanplasse

You're the man, Thanks for the visual.
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cadence90
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by cadence90

thedanplasse wrote:
Wed Jan 23, 2019 8:07 pm
Believe it or not, I've angled the bars down further than the previous owner had them. I ride primarily on the hoods, and rarely on the drops. Plus like I had previously stated I'm new to the sport just getting into it last spring. I bought the bike the previous fall to get outside more. So please pardon my ignorance.
It isn't about ignorance at all. We were all ignorant once, etc., as even very experienced posters like Calnago, etc. will happily attest.

Still, as you admit, you are just starting out, and very likely on 1) a frame that doesn't fit you ideally and 2) is a frame that you have no real vested interest in. So, again, I do not understand the desire to start swapping out the fork, stem, bars, etc. asap. To what end, right now?

The far better and forever more useful time and money investment would be spent on really sorting out the proper fit first, and then doing any aesthetic modifications, whether on this frame or a different one. You keep saying that you wouldn't be "throwing things out" with two forks, two stems, two bars, etc., but, trust us on this, there is also absolutely no point in having a parts bin full of bits that really do not fit one's needs, did cost money to acquire, do take up space, get older by the day, and have very little resale value.

Plenty of excellent advice has been proffered, and people here are very objective, generous, and helpful; this specific bicycle may need its own thread at this point, to keep the focus it is going to need as you start to implement/document the recommended changes.

EDIT:
N.B.: Keep good records of all fit/position modifications, from the starting base (i.e. as the bicycle is now) and including position component name/model/size/position/etc. It's not hard at all once you get it going, and the information going forward is of immense value as you make changes (or go back to earlier posituions.

Really it is just a simple Excel or Word chart and an image that looks like this:
Image

If you want I am more than happy to make/send one for you, using your Bianchi as the base image.
A straight-on photo, in good light, from the drive side, is all one needs. I'll send you a PM.
Last edited by cadence90 on Wed Jan 23, 2019 11:27 pm, edited 3 times in total.
"Gimondi è un eroe umano, che viene sconfitto ma che continua la sua corsa fino a tornare a vincere." - Enrico Ruggeri

thedanplasse
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by thedanplasse

Worded nicely. Great points made too. Thank you. I'll have some serious thinking to do.
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Calnago
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by Calnago

Yes, re what Cadence90 says, I didn’t realize when I responded that this is the general thread for steel bikes. When you start asking questions that will illicit detailed responses you should best start a separate thread versus cluttering up this one. I love the steel bikes thread and a few deserved comments or questions are always fine and appreciated. But your specific questions are now warranting a separate thread.
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cadence90
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by cadence90

Calnago wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 12:09 am
Yes, re what Cadence90 says, I didn’t realize when I responded that this is the general thread for steel bikes. When you start asking questions that will illicit detailed responses you should best start a separate thread versus cluttering up this one. I love the steel bikes thread and a few deserved comments or questions are always fine and appreciated. But your specific questions are now warranting a separate thread.
Yes, exactly.

At the risk of cluttering up this thread further (I will refrain after this): @ thedanplasse, ask if FrankieB or one of the other moderators can move all of this content into a new thread of your own, with whatever title you choose; it will then be a much easier resource for you (and those who advise you) to access in the future as those fit revisions happen while leaving this thread in its intended state.

EDIT:
N.B.: This is not at all meant as any criticism of thedanplasse's posts, etc.; only a forum suggestion.
"Gimondi è un eroe umano, che viene sconfitto ma che continua la sua corsa fino a tornare a vincere." - Enrico Ruggeri

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Ruimteaapjes
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by Ruimteaapjes

2019 is the year for travelling with some light luggage: commuting and I hope to cycle from Amsterdam to Burgundy. But first some test rides to see if it handles well enough with the extra weight. Color-matched Schindelhauer front rack with Ortlieb bags...

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Wingnut
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by Wingnut

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Ruimteaapjes
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by Ruimteaapjes

Could use a less "loud" wheelset but I like the rest of it. Did you use converted 10sp Time Trial shifters for downtube?

Wingnut
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by Wingnut

The wheels are just what I had lying around. I have heaps of classic Campagnolo hubed wheels but these are lighter and I like the fact the cassette hub body is steel. I’ll replace the bushing in the freehub with a bearing off eBay at some stage.

It’s running regular 9 speed non TT shifters.

After using carbon forks on road bikes for years I can’t believe how much better the steel fork performs...theirs just the weight issue.

by Weenie


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