Show me your Winter bikes

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Multebear
Posts: 1320
Joined: Sat May 02, 2015 10:11 pm

by Multebear

MrAnderson wrote:
Fri Nov 23, 2018 7:27 pm

You don't need to get it, it's what I ride and they are MY winter bikes as in bikes I use in the winter! in poor weather i.e. rain, gritty roads bit of ice etc.. :noidea:

A group or 12 ish like minded people go out in any weather and ride bikes? Don't worry about the price I get very good deals on them.

In the Summer or April onwards I'll dig out the Orbea Orca which is my summer bike and the best bike i've ridden to date.
That's all good and fine. Your bikes just don't belong in this topic is all.

There are lot's of other topics, where they would do very well and would be interesting to look at, and you'd get a lot of positive feedback - just not this topic.

They are just regular bikes, no modifications for winter riding made. No offense, they just don't add anything to this topic; re OP's first post:
Morpeth wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2007 8:10 pm
Its getting uncomfortably close to the rainy season over here, time to tuck away the aero wheels and dust off the mud-guarded winter bike. So what will you be riding for the next few months?

Prize for the heaviest :lol:

liam7020
Posts: 1001
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 10:04 am

by liam7020

MrAnderson wrote:
Fri Nov 23, 2018 7:27 pm
A group or 12 ish like minded people go out in any weather and ride bikes? Don't worry about the price I get very good deals on them.

In the Summer or April onwards I'll dig out the Orbea Orca which is my summer bike and the best bike i've ridden to date.
12ish punters covered in road crap and cow sh^te! That's quite funny actually!! Lightweight for winter bike and Orbea for Sunday best?! Hey ho, whatever.
Tarmac SL6 & Campag Record EPS https://weightweenies.starbike.com/foru ... 0&t=153968

"Sometimes you don't need a plan. You just need big balls." Tom Boonen

by Weenie


liam7020
Posts: 1001
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 10:04 am

by liam7020

Just thinking -it's Cumbria so more likely to be sheep sh^te!!!
Tarmac SL6 & Campag Record EPS https://weightweenies.starbike.com/foru ... 0&t=153968

"Sometimes you don't need a plan. You just need big balls." Tom Boonen

spdntrxi
Posts: 3115
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2013 6:11 pm

by spdntrxi

MrAnderson wrote:
Thu Nov 22, 2018 7:50 pm
We all ride similar bikes from Push Cartel, Cipollini's, Parlee's & Looks.

Bikes are never clean at this time of year, it's all good fun though.

Hey I have full portland design works fenders on my Parlee Zero XD.... I resemble that remark. It's pretty flithy right now, but I did clean the chain.

Gregg
Posts: 42
Joined: Sun Aug 18, 2013 6:10 pm

by Gregg

Here is a pic of my fuji on a road with plenty of sheep shit and cattle grids.
I know it's not a looker but works really well for many conditions which aren't perfect and can trash an un protected road bike kit.
I used some silicone cooking mats and cut them to shape for the mudguard flaps and rear has since been trimmed down. The front setup is perfect for keeping the grime off the front mech, chainset and my feet for those miserable days on the dirty back lanes of rural UK.
wheels are handbuilt by http://www.wheelsmith.co.uk/
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Swapped the Deda m35 bars and stem and for a Deda zero -17deg stem
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Gravel mode for when the roads are to icey
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Multebear
Posts: 1320
Joined: Sat May 02, 2015 10:11 pm

by Multebear

Here you go, @MrAnderson. This is my Bastardodale winterbike. And IMO this is what a winterbike is supposed to look like in northern europe or other rainy places.

I did a lot of online ressearch including this topic before I built those fenders some years ago. Each year has been trial and error in order to develop and improve the fenders. The past two years I haven’t found anything to improve. I guess they are where they need be now.

I’ve had the bike built in several different configurations. Both summer and winter configs. The winter config really works well with these fenders.

Obviously it’s a bastard of a bike. I’ve built it with whatever components I and a couple of friends had sitting around. The components are carefully chosen with focus on being affordable, expendable, and durable. In other words, this bike is a machine that will give me my 300-400 km a week in all kinds of weather as affordable and troublefree as possible.

Frame:
Cannondale SuperSix Evo Hi-Mod, size 56, 2014
Resprayed matte black with white decals.

Grouppo:
Is a mix of many different components.
9070 DA shiftlevers
6770 Ultegra derailleurs (10 speed)
5800 105 brakes
7900 DA chainset
Sram chainrings

Wheels:
Handbuild by me.
DT R460 rims
9000 DA rear hub (28h)
DT 240 front hub (24h)
Sapim CX ray spokes (black)
2 DT Aerolite white spokes in each wheel in order to mark the valve
Conti 4 seasons tires 23 mm (with inner tube protectors)


Fenders:
Spencer Omega 35 mm, two sets combined
Mudflap: rear: buddyflaps, front: unknown
Dia Compe fender stay adaptors
Problem Solver fender nuts (attaching the front fender to the fork)
Various hardware including several L brackets



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jekyll man
Posts: 1422
Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 10:23 am
Location: Pack filler

by jekyll man

Di2 on a winter bike, and you had a go at someone else?

Mine:
Ribble 525 Steel 54cm
6800 groupset
520 Spd Sl pedals
Open pro's on Hope Pro3 hubs / 4 seasons 25mm rear, Conti gran prix 25mm front (just clears with modified front guard; 4S= not a chance).
BBB 38cm bars
Bontrager NCS guards.
Weight (with rack, lights etc) approx 2 tons

ImageUntitled by jekyll man, on Flickr

ImageUntitled by jekyll man, on Flickr
Official cafe stop tester

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themidge
Posts: 1176
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2017 4:19 pm
Location: underneath sweet Scottish rain

by themidge

jekyll man wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:18 pm
Di2 on a winter bike, and you had a go at someone else?
What's wrong with Di2 on a winter bike? I've never heard of it suffering from water ingress. If anything an electronic groupset would surely be better than mechanical as it doesn't have the problem of cables getting gunged up. Pretty much the only parts that need to be low end because of wear are the chain, chainrings, cassette, maybe jockey wheels and various bearings.

mattr
Posts: 4673
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

jekyll man wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:18 pm
Di2 on a winter bike, and you had a go at someone else?
TBH, i'd prefer Di2 on my winter bike over my summer bike (if it wasn't so bloody expensive) freezing cables are no fun at all.
Tho attaching mudguards to your quick release skewers is unforgiveable.

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TonyM
Posts: 3259
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 4:11 pm

by TonyM

mattr wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 9:29 pm
jekyll man wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:18 pm
Di2 on a winter bike, and you had a go at someone else?
TBH, i'd prefer Di2 on my winter bike over my summer bike (if it wasn't so bloody expensive) freezing cables are no fun at all.
Tho attaching mudguards to your quick release skewers is unforgiveable.
Same for me. I really like the Di2 on my winter/ rain bike. So easy to shift even when it is so cold and wet.

Multebear
Posts: 1320
Joined: Sat May 02, 2015 10:11 pm

by Multebear

jekyll man wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:18 pm
Di2 on a winter bike, and you had a go at someone else?
As I mentioned, I've had this winterbike in many configurations with both 5800 105 and 6800 grouppos before the di2. Both worked fine, but when I disassebled my previous cx bike some time ago, the di2 didn't have any purpose anymore. It's better to put it on a winterbike than just letting it sit around not getting used.

Besides that, it really makes sense with di2 when your fingers are cold and wet, and you´re hardly able to move them. And the grouppo doesn't get more water, mud and grime now than when it was sitting on the cx bike. Finally it's just the 10-speed ultegra system. It's hardly worth more than new 105 grouppo.
mattr wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 9:29 pm
Tho attaching mudguards to your quick release skewers is unforgiveable.
I've experimented with so many different fender solutions, and I must say, this solution is the best. Period. At least if you have as long fenders as I do. If you ride with all the different sorts of readymade fender solutions (shorter than mine), then do whatever you want. But if you have them as long as I do, you'll have problems removing the rear wheel, because the fenders almost closes the gap, where the rear wheel comes out of the frame. Am I making any sense? It helps when removing the rear wheel that you're able to flex the fender backwards.

Another thing is, that I use this bike sometimes in the summer as well. And the fenders come on and of really easy when not attached to the seatstays. And theres no need for adjusting with this system, they sit exactly the same place everytime I mount them.

So I'm not quite sure @mattr, how this is supposed to be wrong.

Just saying, I've put a lot of thought to both the di2 solution and the fender solutions. No coincidence there.

mattr
Posts: 4673
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

Multebear wrote:
Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:44 am
So please elaborate @mattr, how this is supposed to be wrong.
Its a bodge. QRs aren't really very good at sandwiching multiple pieces of metal together. Especially if you have untextured surfaces in the stack, or something that won't take a knurled surface. (Or a recessed pocket on the drop out, my forks have this). I've seen someone pull a rear wheel out when doing similar. (Ti Frame though.)

Not that I can't see why you've done it, to get the wheel out when using a frame that's not built for guard clearance when using very long/close guards. I had guards of a broadly similar length. But no issue as i have a "proper" winter frame. With long drops and "adequate" space. I also used a long/curved/deep mudflap which goes down the side of the tyre, whereas yours is just a flappy flap. So even though at the tip of the guard i had a couple of cm clear between the guard and tyre, i still had full side coverage.

I've done similar in the past with bikes with no eyelets, but can get p-clips in the same location without any issue (line up with the weld). But that doesn't solve your lack of clearance problem.

Multebear
Posts: 1320
Joined: Sat May 02, 2015 10:11 pm

by Multebear

^I guess you have a point. The fender stay adaptor solutions is just another halfgood/halfbad solution among several other halfbad solutions. Haven’t given me any problems at all though.

I’ve tried the p-clip solution, and I’ve had frames with fender eyelets as well. But I haven’t found a pure carbon racebike with eyelets and rim brakes, which is what I’m aiming for. The cannondale is as racey as they get, and I don’t want to ride alu if I can avoid it. And the fenders are easy to remove and install.

I guess one can’t get 10 out of 10 when it comes to winterbikes.

spdntrxi
Posts: 3115
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2013 6:11 pm

by spdntrxi

p-clips working solidly on my Parlee XD

by Weenie


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Calnago
Posts: 8526
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Well it's definitely winter again... and at the risk of repeating some stuff, I'm going to post a link to the specific post where I outlined the process I went through to 'winterize' my Emonda. Here it is: The Wet Emonda

Over the years, I've used everything... C-clips, P-clips, a lot of duct tape, brazed on eyelets (which need screws that corrode and rattle and are finicky to install and catch on things). And being in the Pacific Northwest you get to see all kinds of MacGyver'd solutions. My latest incarnation is my best, and so far I have not found a single fault to it. And it involves zip ties. Yup, chuck all the heavy hardware, cut it off, zip ties are the answer for a fendered winter road bike that actually is a proper "road bike". Not a cross bike (been there done that), not a toruing bike with eyelets everywhere, but a proper handling road bike which could be race ready in the summer if you choose it to be. But yes, you do need some MacGyver in you, but to be honest, I've never seen a proper road bike with a decent full fender install that didn't involve some MacGyvering. So, as a preview to the post I linked above, here's a few teasers... also @Bilwit in particular (in reference to a pic you shared of your rear bridge setup on you BMC), and anyone else who is having trouble keeping the fender high enough at the brake bridge (often the tightest spot on a road bike to get a fender past), I did notice that you could get way more clearance if you did away with the slotted tab on the fender that is held to the bridge by a bolt and just used the method below. With riding, it's rare that the bolt that holds that tab tight enough stays tight enogh for long. Those of you who have mounted it that way know what I mean I'm sure.

And I also dont' think there is a thing wrong with using Di2 on you winter bike. In fact, why should you even compromise anything on your winter bike, with the exception of having to add full fenders, and flaps. Just because it's a "winter" bike, doesn't mean you have to run crappy stuff... where's the fun in that. All that does is make you long for the days when you can ride your "good" bike. They can all be good. But I do agree that if it's not fendered up fully, then even though you may ride it in the winter, it is definitely NOT a winter bike by anyone's standards who has ridden for months in a wet/cold climate.
Anyway, here's a couple teaser pics of my install. For more, and detailed commentary, see the post I linked to above...
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I know some of you are probably thinking... "Zip ties?... please", but really, the key is prewrapping the stays with about 6 rounds of thick electrical tape (color matched to your bike of course). This completely protects your frame and once you reef down on the zip ties, causes the fender stays to "bite" in and they really don't move, at all. For removal, it's easy... snip snip and they're off. To put on again, just cut a new zip tie and rivet it to the holes that you made in the fenders during the first install. I describe it all I think in the post, which I'll link to again right here... The Wet Emonda
Oh, and I knew there was another "winterizing" thread that I posted to before as well. Just found it...Another winterizing thread
Good luck and happy riding in the rain... well, as happy as one can be.

Cal
Last edited by Calnago on Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:19 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

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