Show me your Winter bikes

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Dannnnn
Posts: 43
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2018 1:00 pm

by Dannnnn

Multebear wrote:
Mon Nov 12, 2018 1:54 pm
I realize it came out a little harsher than meant. And if this is your winterbike then it’s your winterbike, and as such satisfies the headline of this topic.

On the other hand, if you post something for others to see, then you have to expect some sort of feedback. Otherwise it doesn’t really make sense to post anything for others to see.

And what I see (my feedback) when I look at your bike, is a completely regular of the shelf mid/low end racebike. There’s nothing special about it (except that you paintet it yourself, would fit in a DIY paintjob topic). In my opinion it doesn’t add anything to this topic though. If you’d made some modifications to improve it of some sort, that would make it particularly well suited for wintertraining, then yes. But to me it looks completely of the shelf. And no explanation why this particular bike is especially well suited for winter. And from what I understand it isn’t even a winterbike, it’s an indoor bike. Maybe we should have a topic about bikes for indoor training, if there isn’t one already.

There’s a topic called show me your paincave. I think it would fit really good there, with a picture of you whole paincave setup.

This topic should be about showing bikes that are especially suited for outdoor wintertraining, to overcome all the difficulties regarding all the shitty weather you can take your bike out in.
I'm fine with the feedback. Just think it's a bit harsh that because it doesn't satisy what you think makes a "winter bike" means it can't be.

In response to your feedback, that is pretty much what it is. A cheap aluminium race bike with a cheap groupset, 25mm (measure 28mm) Endurance tyres and grippy bar tape. Which is what most winterbikes are, I could stick some mudguards on it, but I hate the way they look (and I try not to go out in the rain anyway).

IMO if that's what these sort of topics are for, that should be stated in the original post. I saw it as "show me your winter bike". I only ride this in winter so it is my winter bike and I have shown it.

by Weenie


Marin
Posts: 3431
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:48 am
Location: Vienna Austria

by Marin

If it's a winter bike for you it fits in this thread. Thanks for posting it!

Multebear
Posts: 1266
Joined: Sat May 02, 2015 10:11 pm

by Multebear

Morpeth wrote:
Thu Sep 20, 2007 8:10 pm
Its getting uncomfortably close to the rainy season over here, time to tuck away the aero wheels and dust off the mud-guarded winter bike. So what will you be riding for the next few months?

Prize for the heaviest :lol:
I think the first post in this thread from 2007 sums it up pretty well IMO... Just saying...

Here’s the link to the paincave topic:

https://weightweenies.starbike.com/foru ... =Pain+Cave

Gregg
Posts: 42
Joined: Sun Aug 18, 2013 6:10 pm

by Gregg

Image[/url]

Jopie666
Posts: 44
Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2016 9:48 am
Location: Den Haag

by Jopie666

I’m a little bit scared to post this...
actually this is my summer bike in winter commute modus.
Did the trick for a nice evening training ride behind a derny. Image
Vittoria pave 24mm tubulars, sks raceblade pro mudguards, Tufo extreme sealant and a used specialized spare tubular. Together with some lights it should be enough for fall and winter.
Image
Oh, it's all right. I'm sure that we can handle this situation maturely, just like the responsible adults that we are. Isn't that right, Mr... Poopy Pants?

Nejmann
Posts: 454
Joined: Mon May 06, 2013 6:25 pm

by Nejmann

Jopie666 wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:41 am
I’m a little bit scared to post this...
actually this is my summer bike in winter commute modus.
Did the trick for a nice evening training ride behind a derny. Image
Vittoria pave 24mm tubulars, sks raceblade pro mudguards, Tufo extreme sealant and a used specialized spare tubular. Together with some lights it should be enough for fall and winter.
Image
I Think it’s a good idea. I have a winterbike, but if you think about it, you can get alot of chainrings, casettes and so on for the money of a new bike.

mattr
Posts: 4606
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

Nejmann wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:31 pm
I Think it’s a good idea. I have a winterbike, but if you think about it, you can get alot of chainrings, casettes and so on for the money of a new bike.
Not really, my first winter bike cost me about £600. That was after i'd spent about the same on running (ruining?) my summer bike through the winter. Chains and cassettes are only the beginning. All the kit you trash (as despite what many say, raceblades don't give the same coverage as proper mudguards, not by a long shot) front mechs, pedals, brake calipers, chainrings, rims, hubs, headsets. It gets expensive.

That one lasted me 5 or 6 years until the seat tube started to rust through. Swapped everything onto a new frame, which is still doing sterling service over 10 years later. Would cost me about £1200 to buy today. Swapped the groupset three or four years ago, only did that as i had a spare part used groupset lying about. The stuff on it would have done another couple of seasons.

Nejmann
Posts: 454
Joined: Mon May 06, 2013 6:25 pm

by Nejmann

mattr wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:51 pm
Nejmann wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:31 pm
I Think it’s a good idea. I have a winterbike, but if you think about it, you can get alot of chainrings, casettes and so on for the money of a new bike.
Not really, my first winter bike cost me about £600. That was after i'd spent about the same on running (ruining?) my summer bike through the winter. Chains and cassettes are only the beginning. All the kit you trash (as despite what many say, raceblades don't give the same coverage as proper mudguards, not by a long shot) front mechs, pedals, brake calipers, chainrings, rims, hubs, headsets. It gets expensive.

That one lasted me 5 or 6 years until the seat tube started to rust through. Swapped everything onto a new frame, which is still doing sterling service over 10 years later. Would cost me about £1200 to buy today. Swapped the groupset three or four years ago, only did that as i had a spare part used groupset lying about. The stuff on it would have done another couple of seasons.
I hate you. Haha. I take it back. You’re right!

Multebear
Posts: 1266
Joined: Sat May 02, 2015 10:11 pm

by Multebear

mattr wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:51 pm
Nejmann wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:31 pm
I Think it’s a good idea. I have a winterbike, but if you think about it, you can get alot of chainrings, casettes and so on for the money of a new bike.
Not really, my first winter bike cost me about £600. That was after i'd spent about the same on running (ruining?) my summer bike through the winter. Chains and cassettes are only the beginning. All the kit you trash (as despite what many say, raceblades don't give the same coverage as proper mudguards, not by a long shot) front mechs, pedals, brake calipers, chainrings, rims, hubs, headsets. It gets expensive.

That one lasted me 5 or 6 years until the seat tube started to rust through. Swapped everything onto a new frame, which is still doing sterling service over 10 years later. Would cost me about £1200 to buy today. Swapped the groupset three or four years ago, only did that as i had a spare part used groupset lying about. The stuff on it would have done another couple of seasons.

I mostly agree. It depends on a lot of factors though. If you have a very expensive summerbike with ceramic bearings all the way, and you don’t take good care of it after every ride, then yes. One might wear out driveline, bearings, wheels and derailleurs. But if you have winter wheels, and winter wear parts on the driveline, then it might work. Cassette, chain and chainrings for winter use, and a good cleaning after every bad weather ride might work.

That said, I’d never take my summerbike out for northern European wintertraining. I have two dedicated winter/rain bikes and a cx bike to cover those tasks. They are in a different priceleague as the summerbike, and if something happened to them, then I’ll survive.

shamrock134
Posts: 58
Joined: Thu May 11, 2017 9:24 am

by shamrock134

Built a new winter bike recently and now I'm a tubeless/disc/mudguard convert.

Bowman Pilgrims Disc
Campag Potenza Disc
Hunt 4 Season wheels
PDW full metal guards
10.1kg fully-loaded

Image
Image
Image

Jopie666
Posts: 44
Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2016 9:48 am
Location: Den Haag

by Jopie666

shamrock134 wrote:
Thu Nov 15, 2018 9:25 am
Built a new winter bike recently and now I'm a tubeless/disc/mudguard convert.

Bowman Pilgrims Disc
Campag Potenza Disc
Hunt 4 Season wheels
PDW full metal guards
10.1kg fully-loaded
Very nice! And the last picture is beautifull!

mattr
Posts: 4606
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

Multebear wrote:
Thu Nov 15, 2018 8:56 am
I mostly agree. It depends on a lot of factors though. If you have a very expensive summerbike with ceramic bearings all the way, and you don’t take good care of it after every ride, then yes. One might wear out driveline, bearings, wheels and derailleurs. But if you have winter wheels, and winter wear parts on the driveline, then it might work. Cassette, chain and chainrings for winter use, and a good cleaning after every bad weather ride might work.
TBH, by the time i've swapped all the winter wear parts, cables etc, fitted (not very good) mudguards, bought new wheels, fitted lights, saddle bag, blah blah blah. I'm only really missing a frame and a few odds and ends. (and i look after my bikes meticulously)

And then i have a WHOLE spare bike (with decent guards) to use if I happen to be going out and the weather looks a bit rubbish. Or if i'm going out and it might get dark if i get back late. Cos lights are almost always fitted, so is the saddle bag and mudflaps. And the 28mm tyres that i can't fit on my "best" bike.
And i don't have to dismantle and reassemble either bike a couple of times a year.

I do similar with MTBs. Made out of spare parts and an £89 steel frame.

Multebear
Posts: 1266
Joined: Sat May 02, 2015 10:11 pm

by Multebear

^agreed

I definitely prefer having a winterbike than swapping components all the time. It’s nice to be able to decide which bike to use 5 min before leaving the house, instead of having to plan several days ahead and swapping components.

bilwit
Posts: 1174
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2016 5:49 am
Location: Seattle, WA

by bilwit

BMC Wintermachine!

Image

Image

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TonyM
Posts: 3098
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 4:11 pm

by TonyM

Good to see that you did your RM02 as a full winter bike 👍
Which fenders are you using?

by Weenie


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