Show me your Winter bikes

Moderator: Moderator Team

Post Reply
jeanjacques
Posts: 133
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2016 11:01 am
Location: France

by jeanjacques

zmjones wrote:
Fri May 18, 2018 8:26 pm
Image

clearance is pretty tight with these tires (38mm g-one) so i normally run the 35mm g-one speed on tarmac. this was after one of the omtm rides.
Finally a dirty winter bike !

Mine some months ago:
Image

by Weenie


User avatar
TonyM
Posts: 2650
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 4:11 pm

by TonyM

Sounds more like cyclocross than road biking 🤣

jeanjacques
Posts: 133
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2016 11:01 am
Location: France

by jeanjacques

TonyM wrote:
Sat May 19, 2018 12:13 am
Sounds more like cyclocross than road biking 🤣
No, no, road bike: "hey buddy, follow me it's just a quick shortcut !"

Lot of fun for him too:
Image
Image

Dannnnn
Posts: 33
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2018 1:00 pm

by Dannnnn

My winter Spesh Allez.

Nothing special on Tiagra 4700, Fulcrum Quattro wheels and Deda finishing kit.
Frame was picked up for £25 and repainted by me, then built up to a fairly tight budget.
Weighs 9.0kg in the form seen here but got a pair of Kysrium Elites to go on and a few lighter bits.

Image

User avatar
rainerhq
Posts: 742
Joined: Wed Dec 15, 2010 10:32 am
Location: Estonia

by rainerhq

Imagine all the dirt/water/snow without mudguards.
Domane
"Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride"

User avatar
TonyM
Posts: 2650
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2015 4:11 pm

by TonyM

Good looking and good for that budget!

But don’t you use fenders/ mudguards in the winter?

Dannnnn
Posts: 33
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2018 1:00 pm

by Dannnnn

I have an ass saver but yep I just get dirty.

Really don't like mudguards on bikes and I don't actually do much riding outdoors in winter.

This year I might start doing some commuting on it so will look at getting some (it's also be repainted again)

alpinestar
Posts: 153
Joined: Wed Dec 04, 2013 8:37 am
Location: Lyngby, Denmark
Contact:

by alpinestar

My winter rig. Caad 10 with 105, praxis chainset, 3t stem/bars China carbon seatpost and pro Turnix saddle. Aksium wheels. ImageImage



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

OhBanville
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Nov 09, 2018 12:22 am

by OhBanville

nemeseri wrote:
Mon Jun 26, 2017 4:58 am
Image

CAAD10 (Size 48) with PDW full metal fenders. Ultegra 6800, Pioneer Power Meter, H+Son Archetype rim w/ white industries t11 hubs.

Hey - what tyres are you riding on there?

Multebear
Posts: 1168
Joined: Sat May 02, 2015 10:11 pm

by Multebear

Dannnnn wrote:
Fri Jul 13, 2018 8:24 am
My winter Spesh Allez.

Nothing special on Tiagra 4700, Fulcrum Quattro wheels and Deda finishing kit.
Frame was picked up for £25 and repainted by me, then built up to a fairly tight budget.
Weighs 9.0kg in the form seen here but got a pair of Kysrium Elites to go on and a few lighter bits.

Image
Sorry, but this is not a winter bike.

Just because you have a bike dedicated for your winter riding, doesn't make it a winterbike. Either you don't have the use for a winter bike where you live, or you refuse to ride a proper winter bike. Winter bikes come with fenders. The longer the better. Like this:

Image

I'm sorry, that you've become the target for this, but the rules for what we would like to see in this topic need refreshing.

A winterbike is a bike, that you can ride in the rain without getting dirty or spraying your companions with dirt from the road. Period. We can't do anything about the rain, but we can fend of the dirt from the road with a proper setup.

If you live in SoCal or similar, you don't have the need for a winterbike, and thus you don't have anything to add to this topic.

This is a prime example of a very good winterbike (stolen from another topic). Let's keep the winterbikes topic like this one:


Calnago wrote:
Wed Nov 16, 2016 6:59 am
I'm in the Pacific Northwest, so yeah... a dedicated rain bike is pretty common place amongst cyclists here. Don't go on a group ride without fenders.

The fenders themselves are Planet Bike Cascadia fenders. Plastic, round and fit the profile of newer Shimano brake calipers perfectly. I remove all the metal hardware, block the holes with electrical tape, then rivet them on using zip ties around the brake bridge bolts. I specifically wanted regular brakes for my "rain bike", as adding discs can also add complexity with fender mounting. And in the rain as far as I'm concerned fenders are a far more important feature than discs. I tried a disc braked bike, but it was dry out and I saw no advantage. Plus it handled like a sloth. I knew that I needed to try it in the pouring, torrential rain, but you know what... when that day came I just didn't feel like going out in that crap just to try the disc brakes. And that's the rub... people swear by how great they are in inclement weather, and maybe they are... but the fact is, if the weather's that bad out, I probably am not going to gear up and head out just so I can say... "Awesome, sure glad I got these disc brakes... now can I go back home and get dry?". Lol. Sounds silly but it's kinda true. Our winters can be very wet, but more often than not, we go out on the bikes when there's a clearing in the weather. So, while the roads may be wet, it's usually not raining that bad, and no one really looks forward to riding in the rain... but it's nice to have fenders for when you get caught in it. As for discs, I find that caution in the rain is really the important thing, regardless of whether you have disc brakes or rim. I set this bike up to be able to have a riding experience basically the same as in the dry on my nicest road bikes, except for the bad weather of course. When people say half way through the rainy season... "I can't wait to get back on my 'good' bike", I don't relate because the actual riding experience for me is the same. I feel like I am on my "good" bike. That's not the issue... I just want some sunshine and dry weather.

The flaps are from a guy in Seattle, who I've never met, but friends turned me on to his business of providing flaps of different kinds to bicyclists. Really good stuff... the flaps on my bike, when hit by a car's light, show up like a neon white sign on a highway. I cut them up to fit and rivet them on. Since you asked... here's the link... http://www.rainydaybiking.com/

And here's some more pics... sorry if I repeat some from my last post...

Full shot...
Image


Front fender is both rotated a bit reward from where they intended it to be mounted (I got rid of the original moutning hardware) and then I riveted an additional flap to the existing rubber flap. It extends to within about 3-4cm of the pavement, but is stiff enough to flex but not enough to start hitting your feet on a fast descent from the wind blowing it backwards...
Image


Good shot of both flaps... and a cat...
Image


And from the back...
Image


Shots of the installation from all angles. I rivet the fenders with the rivets popping on the outside of the fender. This allow the head of the rivet to sit almost flush with the inside of the fender, giving maximum clearance for the tire... basically the complete install is done with 3/16" pop rivets, some brass spoke washers, some zip ties, and a 3/16" drill (drilling the holes for the rivets, along with using the spoke washers, may be why I don't have any cracking of fenders like you described when using rivets)...
Image


All the ends of the fender stays get snipped off with bolt cutters and the protective rubber pieces put on... so nothing sticks beyond the fender profile to catch things, and just add a whole lot of ugly...
Image


Drilling the holes to rivet the flaps on so that they look perfectly straight from behind is a task for sure. I have one buddy who when behind me will tell me it's an eight of an inch to one side... and of course when I get home I'll have to check. If it really was, I would redo it. Ha... But usually it's just a case of him messin' with me again...
Image


Underneath the rear brake bridge. You can see both the flat almost flush rivet head on the inside and if you look a the other side you can see the outer pop rivet. First I put the pop rivet through from the inside, then the zip tie (pre drilled with a 3/16" hole), then the brass spoke washer so that when the rivet is "popped" it doesn't pull through the softer zip tie and/or fender...
Image


Buttoned up behind the seat tube as well... with tape to give some bite to the tie on the frame, and I use little rubber pieces or "carbon leather" pieces from Lizard Skin Chainstay protectors, to put between contact points between the fender and frame. This eliminates ALL rattles... there are none, even going over bumps...
Image


And the front... slides completely under the front fork... no breaks... zip tied around the brake bolt at front. Also, the zip ties riveted to the sides of the fender like they are, when tightened down actually spread the fender a bit allowing for good clearance at the crucial points...
Image


And the underside of the front fork... Continuous fender... no breaks, and good clearance...
Image


Nice clearance all around the 25c Continental 25mm Competition Tubulars... my favorite wet weather tire....
Image


Just above fork dropouts get wrapped with color matching (to your frame) electrical tape by a good amount (at least 6 or 7 rounds), and that provides the ideal bite for the fender stays to be mounted to. When you tighten up the zip ties, it's as solid as if they were bolted with steel bolts onto brazed on fender mounts... except it's still a road bike, shortish wheelbase, nice handling, all the benefits and now... dry feet as well... Biggest treat of all for wet weather riding...
Image



Favorite foul weather tires and rims (Ambrosio Nemesis, nonmachined brake track... I think these brake so much better than machined brake tracks)...
Image


And there you pretty much have it... finally after all these years I finally got it right. So happy!
And to think several hours ago this bike was filthy... I cleaned it up for the photoshoot. It won't be this clean again until spring. However, with the full coverage fenders, it stays clean. In fact, if I never washed another bike until then, it would be much cleaner than my non-fendered bikes. Most of the surface dirt it accumulates is from the spray from other peoples bikes.

Have fun, and stay dry...

Monkeyfudger
Posts: 257
Joined: Thu Apr 11, 2013 7:26 pm

by Monkeyfudger

I’ll play, didn’t actually get used last year as I was too slack and stuck to the turbo, didn’t seem to effect the crit racing but I’m blaming my rubbishness at the only road race I managed to do on a lack of winter miles...silly? Maybe...

Anyway, first gen Genesis Equilibrium and a total anti-weenie, 5600-105, Rotor 3D24/P2M, Shutter Precision front dynamo and Hope Pro11 rear. I actually kind of love this bike and really need to resirect her from that dark corner she’s currently in.
Attachments
0374473E-DA52-45F2-8942-054027BBD3F6.jpeg

Dannnnn
Posts: 33
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2018 1:00 pm

by Dannnnn

Multebear wrote:
Sun Nov 11, 2018 10:19 pm

Sorry, but this is not a winter bike.

Just because you have a bike dedicated for your winter riding, doesn't make it a winterbike. Either you don't have the use for a winter bike where you live, or you refuse to ride a proper winter bike. Winter bikes come with fenders. The longer the better. Like this:

Image

I'm sorry, that you've become the target for this, but the rules for what we would like to see in this topic need refreshing.

A winterbike is a bike, that you can ride in the rain without getting dirty or spraying your companions with dirt from the road. Period. We can't do anything about the rain, but we can fend of the dirt from the road with a proper setup.

If you live in SoCal or similar, you don't have the need for a winterbike, and thus you don't have anything to add to this topic.
[Snipped the monster quote -- thanks, PP]


Why can't it be a winter bike. It lives on the turbo all year and then gets ridden in winter only.
What should I call it instead then? My other bike, my not so nice bike?
I never ride in a group so don't need to worry about flicking stuff up at people behind me.

Why does it have to have mudguards?
Does that mean summer bikes can't have mudguards?

Maybe you should get the topic name changed to "Show me your bikes that have mudguards fitted"

Multebear
Posts: 1168
Joined: Sat May 02, 2015 10:11 pm

by Multebear

I realize it came out a little harsher than meant. And if this is your winterbike then it’s your winterbike, and as such satisfies the headline of this topic.

On the other hand, if you post something for others to see, then you have to expect some sort of feedback. Otherwise it doesn’t really make sense to post anything for others to see.

And what I see (my feedback) when I look at your bike, is a completely regular of the shelf mid/low end racebike. There’s nothing special about it (except that you paintet it yourself, would fit in a DIY paintjob topic). In my opinion it doesn’t add anything to this topic though. If you’d made some modifications to improve it of some sort, that would make it particularly well suited for wintertraining, then yes. But to me it looks completely of the shelf. And no explanation why this particular bike is especially well suited for winter. And from what I understand it isn’t even a winterbike, it’s an indoor bike. Maybe we should have a topic about bikes for indoor training, if there isn’t one already.

There’s a topic called show me your paincave. I think it would fit really good there, with a picture of you whole paincave setup.

This topic should be about showing bikes that are especially suited for outdoor wintertraining, to overcome all the difficulties regarding all the shitty weather you can take your bike out in.

User avatar
themidge
Posts: 922
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2017 4:19 pm
Location: yer ma

by themidge

Here's mine, mudguards included :wink:
Image
It could do with a rear mudflap and a better front one, but it'll do. It's certainly much better than some people on the local group rides' totally non-existent mudguards.
@Calnago's winter bike is a great example of cleanly fitting mudguards onto a bike that isn't supposed to take them, but even better would be to use a frame with proper mudguard mounts (eyelets on the dropouts, a chainstay bridge attachment, and mounts at the brake). I'm not sure a frame that has low weight, good geometry, and proper mounts even exists though, so custom is the way to go for the 'perfect' winter bike.
My perfect winter bike would have:
- a custom Ti (non corrosive!) frame with geometry as racey as possible to fit mudguards and 28mm tyres or 32's without guards
- sram force/rival 10 speed polished to oblivion (to fit with 10 speed red on the summer bike)
- wheels: DA7800/7900 hubs w/ TB14's (again, possible to use on summer bike, max cross-compatibility is the objective)
- finishing kit all polished alloy, to brighten up those dark winter days
- lights attached in an attractive and unobtrusive way, some people's setups (and mine at the moment) can look really awful
Parts that don't wear out on a winter bike might as well be as nice (or nearly as nice) as on a summer bike. Only the drivetrain, wheels, and tyres need suffer the extra weight and slowness of increased durability.

by Weenie


nemeseri
Posts: 724
Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2015 5:40 pm

by nemeseri

OhBanville wrote:
Fri Nov 09, 2018 12:25 am
Hey - what tyres are you riding on there?
Continental GP 4000s II - 23mm. Wider tires simply didn't fit properly, but this combination was pretty good still.

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post