Glueing tubulars [the tubular thread]

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
Geoff
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Location: Canada

by Geoff

A conventional paint thinner will work for simple jobs like cleaning-off the brake tracks. For bigger jobs, I like Goof-Off, too.

Paint thinner is a petroleum-based solvent and leaves behind an oily residure, so be sure to wipe the braking surface well with alcohol and a clean rag before you touch your nice cork pads to them.

mr2scott
Posts: 38
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2018 12:39 pm

by mr2scott

A hair dryer or a heat gun makes old glue easy to peel off too, if you want to go the chemical less route. Tolune is nasty stuff, it basically opens holes in cell membranes and lets whatever else can dissolve in it pass through.

by Weenie


Geoff
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Location: Canada

by Geoff

Yes, use nitrile gloves...

markyboy
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Location: Bristol uk

by markyboy

I am using the belgian method i think its called,1 layer of glue on the rim and 1 layer on the tyre then tape,i find it so much cleaner than just glue to mount.
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Calnago
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by Calnago

Ouch! The “Belgian” method is really just a name to describe the building up of the center of a rim bed (relative to its sides) to effectively increase its radius in order to create a better fit for a tire that has a radius significantly larger than the rim it is going on. So, using some material in the middle of the rim bed in between the tire and rim can help that process. You can use tape strips to do this or whatever, but ultimately you’re just trying to create a better fit between a big tubular going on a narrow rim. Hardly necessary these days as you can get rims plenty wide enough for the tubulars you want to run.
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KCookie
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by KCookie

Well after my disastrous first time using Vittoria Mastic I used Mastic pro today and it was a lot easier. Tyre went on no problem at all, didn't even need straightening. One lesson learnt with the pro is not to use a sachet of glue for the wheel and one for the tyre, as stated, it's way to much. One for both is ample. Had to remove a fair amount with my finger, but all in all I'm happy with the outcome and won't use the boxes of tape I've got lying around. Saved 16g to. Bonus.
I still need to learn to mount the tyre without getting glue all over the brake track, I should have waited a little longer for the glue to set but was a little nervous after the last disaster and felt wet glue would be easier to align the tyre if needed. Even though it's water based glue it useless for removing any access. Acetone did the job quite easily. I'm now converted.

Alec24831221
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Joined: Mon May 27, 2019 1:11 pm

by Alec24831221

I tried glue once and never again. It takes a lot of effort to pull the tyre on and at the same time you are trying to keep things clean and grease free.

I moved on to Continental tape. Just one layer on the rim after cleaning and de-greasing thoroughly. Keep the backing paper on and ensure the join is at the valve for ease of locating the end later. Fit your tyre and centralise the valve with an extension if used, and of course centralise on the rim. Pump up to 10 Bar. Leave overnight then deflate and pull an edge of the backing paper over itself and out one side of the tyre at as shallow an angle as possible. Slowly pull the tape and slightly lift the tyre as you go. Keep an eye out for any rough edges on the backing tape as you don’t want to leave any remnants on the glue. Make any minor adjustments before pumping back up to 10 Bar and leaving overnight.

I have used this method for many years and all I can say is that it is very difficult to remove the tyre when it needs replaced, so I must be doing something right.

addictR1
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Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2012 1:11 am

by addictR1

Alec24831221 wrote:I tried glue once and never again. It takes a lot of effort to pull the tyre on and at the same time you are trying to keep things clean and grease free.

I moved on to Continental tape. Just one layer on the rim after cleaning and de-greasing thoroughly. Keep the backing paper on and ensure the join is at the valve for ease of locating the end later. Fit your tyre and centralise the valve with an extension if used, and of course centralise on the rim. Pump up to 10 Bar. Leave overnight then deflate and pull an edge of the backing paper over itself and out one side of the tyre at as shallow an angle as possible. Slowly pull the tape and slightly lift the tyre as you go. Keep an eye out for any rough edges on the backing tape as you don’t want to leave any remnants on the glue. Make any minor adjustments before pumping back up to 10 Bar and leaving overnight.

I have used this method for many years and all I can say is that it is very difficult to remove the tyre when it needs replaced, so I must be doing something right.
What kind of tape do you use?

If you use Veloflex tires I find that very easy to mount. I’ve started learning with glue and had thumb blisters like a mofo, but learned quickly and with the water trick, it’s easily mounted and centered. Most importantly, hard to remove without using a tire lever.


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KCookie
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Location: Pom living in Australia

by KCookie

Alec24831221 wrote:I tried glue once and never again. It takes a lot of effort to pull the tyre on and at the same time you are trying to keep things clean and grease free.

I moved on to Continental tape. Just one layer on the rim after cleaning and de-greasing thoroughly. Keep the backing paper on and ensure the join is at the valve for ease of locating the end later. Fit your tyre and centralise the valve with an extension if used, and of course centralise on the rim. Pump up to 10 Bar. Leave overnight then deflate and pull an edge of the backing paper over itself and out one side of the tyre at as shallow an angle as possible. Slowly pull the tape and slightly lift the tyre as you go. Keep an eye out for any rough edges on the backing tape as you don’t want to leave any remnants on the glue. Make any minor adjustments before pumping back up to 10 Bar and leaving overnight.

I have used this method for many years and all I can say is that it is very difficult to remove the tyre when it needs replaced, so I must be doing something right.
I thought the same when I glued with Vittoria Mastic, then tried the Vittoria Mastic Pro and it was easier. The last couple of years ive been using Tufo tape, sure taping is quick, clean and easy but using glue once you get the hang of it is easy, so they say. I still have a long way to go to say its easy but I'm willing to learn. Next time I need to keep the brake tracks clean of glue, but we learn from our mistakes.

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Alec24831221
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Joined: Mon May 27, 2019 1:11 pm

by Alec24831221

I use Continental tape with 22mm Continental Gatorskin sprinter tubs. Just trying 19mm Podiums the now, for a change.

I find that when you have the confidence to push on corners and run over rugged/normal UK road surfaces, then why change what you know to work. I don’t think 1 layer of tape would offer an appreciable disadvantage in weight gain. Certainly not enough to hamper my abilities anyway.

Geoff
Posts: 5259
Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2003 2:25 am
Location: Canada

by Geoff

@Kcookie, a clean terry rag with some household paint thinner will make short work of any excess glue that gets on the brake track. Paint thinner is petroleum-based, so make sure that you clean the brake track well with a fresh, damp rag before you ride them.

@Alec24831221, +1 on the 22s...

KCookie
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Location: Pom living in Australia

by KCookie

Geoff wrote:@Kcookie, a clean terry rag with some household paint thinner will make short work of any excess glue that gets on the brake track. Paint thinner is petroleum-based, so make sure that you clean the brake track well with a fresh, damp rag before you ride them.

@Alec24831221, +1 on the 22s...
Many thanks for the info. Every little bit helps.

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bcmf
Posts: 92
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 5:00 pm

by bcmf

Let the last layer of glue dry for about 20 mins on the basetape....I let it dry while putting a fresh wet layer on the rim.
Then by the time I finished the rim and get it ready the glue on the basetape has dried enough so that it doesnt go everywhere.
Mounting the tyre ,even a new conti, like this means I dont get glue all over the brake track ,hands, shoes,hair etc.
Oh and dont go lashing the glue on like its goingout of fashion, Nice thin even layers is the way.

addictR1
Posts: 1758
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2012 1:11 am

by addictR1

today my veloflex spinter 22 rear tire finally gave out. had multiple punctures even the sealant couldn't fix. i glued it on about a year ago and always kept my bike indoors. when i removed it on the road today to replace with the arenberg spare i brought along, the old tub's glue was all smap, crackle and pop. yup.. it was dried and crispy. i was quite surprised, as i would think it should have some flex, maybe?

anyways, now i'm waiting for the glue to be removed using Effetto Mariposa Carogna Remover. so that got me thinking about perhaps giving tape a try. a couple of my riding buddies who races swears by the tape and when one of them had a rip the other day, i tried to remove his tubs off with hand, it was a biatch to remove. i thought it would easily come off. still had to use a tire lever to get it started.

so that being said, i love using glue and have mastered it, but the cleaning process is what i dislike the most. so hopefully using Effetto Mariposa Carogna Remover will make it easy.

but if venturing into tape, which would be a better choice to use? Effetto Carogna Tubular Rim Tape, Tufo Gluing Tape, or others? my reynolds have Internal: 16.00 mm.
also, once you remove it, i know it comes off clean on the rim, but how about when you remove from the basetape? does it ruin it?

KCookie
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Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2015 9:40 am
Location: Pom living in Australia

by KCookie

I've always used the Tufo tape on my lightweights, as you say the tyres are still a bitch to remove. Sometimes it does remove a little of the base tape but in my case nothing to worry about.

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by Weenie


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