The tubular sealant thread.

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
snip001
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Oct 18, 2017 2:41 pm

by snip001

Guys, I've been using tubs with Stan's for about 5000km with good success (but I don't think I ever even needed it to plug a hole... never noticed anyways)

Time has come to replace the tires (sidewall of the rear tire is starting to rip) and I'm torn between running the tire pre-filled with sealant or carrying a bottle with me. I haven't had it harden inside the tire, but it's always something that has worried me. I have seen a video of a guy removing hardened sealant by mixing it with water, has anyone tried that?

Also, does anyone have a suggestion as to how to remove the sealant before it's dried without making a HUGE mess / plugging the valve (not such a hassle, since the cores are removable, but would rather avoid it anyways)?

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Kayrehn
Posts: 1044
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 6:06 pm

by Kayrehn

My idea is that unless you are racing and hope that punctures patch by themselves without stopping, there's no point affecting performance by injecting sealant beforehand. AFAIK there's no way to remove coagulated sealant. On the other hand, it's not really necessary imo. I once cut up a tub that I thought had quite a bit of sealant in it and I can hardly see them once it dried up.

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sungod
Posts: 1540
Joined: Fri Dec 24, 2010 9:37 pm
Location: it's raining, it must be uk

by sungod

^^^ this

i only put sealant in if there's a puncture (tufo extreme), with latex tubes this will mostly dry out in 2-3 months, but it still remains tacky enough to stick the inner tube together if allowed to deflate

with only a valve stem aperture to work through, i think once sealant is in, it's staying in

snip001
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Oct 18, 2017 2:41 pm

by snip001

I was thinking more along the lines of removing the sealant while it's still liquid, so as to replace it with newer sealant, but I read Lennard's attempt to do this on velonews and it wasn't quite as easy as it seems... I guess I'll hold out on putting the sealant in and buy a caffelatex espresso for roadside repairs

TheKaiser
Posts: 502
Joined: Thu Sep 05, 2013 3:29 pm

by TheKaiser

snip001 wrote:I was thinking more along the lines of removing the sealant while it's still liquid, so as to replace it with newer sealant, but I read Lennard's attempt to do this on velonews and it wasn't quite as easy as it seems... I guess I'll hold out on putting the sealant in and buy a caffelatex espresso for roadside repairs


Yeah, I think Lennard said he is no longer doing that whole process of vacuuming it out that he originally wrote about, due to the difficulty and mediocre results. If you do have sealant in a tubular, he suggested keeping them inflated even in the offseason, and spinning them regularly to prevent it drying/coagulating on one side and throwing the balance off. As mentioned above, if allowed to deflate, you also run the risk of gluing the tube together anywhere that it is in contact with itself, and it will then either inflate unevenly when you go to reinflate it, or burst due to the uneven stresses.

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