Delaying Sealant drying out

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
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WinterRider
Posts: 564
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2013 2:46 pm

by WinterRider

A user here of Orange Endurance which I am very happy with. I run 3 sets tubeless.. 2 of which are non tubeless Conti Ultra ll's...one of those in 25mm goes down relatively quickly due to tire bead/tire fit and the inner sealant I applied to the tire inside isn't the equal I suspect of said liners in tubeless rubber.

So... how to extend the OE? Is this more an issue of evaporation: the water only a carrier not bound to the latex? Or how would the chemist types around this forum quantify the process said OE drying?

Have said set of Ultra's not in current use.. they dried.. very hard re-seating sans adding OE. Rear tire has 2700+ miles and not near washing the wear indicator off... make excellent every day use tires. Am considering rotating the set and then doing some experiments w sealants.. hence the inquiry.

Drop/small quantity of some oil.. drop of dish soap.. beer... ? :roll:

Real caveat: NOT loosing the excellent re-seal ability of OE.. I am impressed.. and that does NOT occur often. I continue to run this rear to see how long the OE handles this cut.. which was at least 1000 mi previous. The shallow wear indicator not even close to gone....

Next set definitely Conti 5000 tubeless.. yet I know the rolling resistance difference between them and ll's is insignificant.
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Ultra lls 25 2700 miles.JPG
Litespeed 2000 Appalachian 61 cm
Litespeed 1998 Blue Ridge 61cm

Fitness rider.. 2 yrs from seven decades age.

That is my story and I'm stick'n to it.

by Weenie


AJS914
Posts: 3770
Joined: Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:52 pm

by AJS914

You can put a drop of super glue into a cut like that.

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WinterRider
Posts: 564
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2013 2:46 pm

by WinterRider

AJS914 wrote:
Sat Aug 10, 2019 1:40 pm
You can put a drop of super glue into a cut like that.

I might.. be the guy who started that.. yrs ago. Figure if not me.. another 'geezer'. Point well taken though.. just how long will the OE get it done..... I 'might have' stuffed it w glue on the rd.. no memory of such... but ya know how that goes. (And the cut have failed to enter the inner wall.. which looks doubtful)

Reason for reply: what is the name of the ?marine stuff the guy posted about for 'long term' cut filling?

I used to carry.. still do a few.. slivers of inner tube.. which I stuffed into the holes along w glue. Found didn't need the rubber.
Litespeed 2000 Appalachian 61 cm
Litespeed 1998 Blue Ridge 61cm

Fitness rider.. 2 yrs from seven decades age.

That is my story and I'm stick'n to it.

TheKaiser
Posts: 644
Joined: Thu Sep 05, 2013 3:29 pm

by TheKaiser

On the super glue for tire cut topic, most cyanoacrylate (CA) adhesives that I've seen sold as standard instant bonding "super glue", "krazy glue" etc...end up being somewhat hard and/or brittle when dried, which has never seemed like a good match to me for a tire, which has to flex this way and that. I think I may have even heard an account at one point of someone who glued a tread cut (which didn't penetrate the casing or cause air loss), and then the hardened glue acted like a little bit of embedded glass, eventually puncturing the casing. I'm not saying that is common, just that it illustrates a worst case scenario of the mismatch in materials. There are, however, a bunch of specialty CA products that I've seen, which tout their flexibility (while keeping the typically great CA traits of quick drying and firm hold), and I've been keen to try them. Last I recall, the biggest array I'd seen was for R/C car usage, where they use those flexy CA glues for adhering tires to rims to prevent them spinning under torque.

Your mention of "marine stuff" rings a bell for me too, but I can't recall any product names. Do you recall it being a hi-tech product, or really cheap? I ask because there is so called "Barge Cement" which is generally cheap and comes in a big can, however despite it's nautical name it seems to mostly be used by cobblers for gluing rubber soles to shoes.

Back to your original question though, about extending sealant life with your Orange Endurance, have you looked at any of the threads on "Homebrew" sealant on the MTBR forums? Granted, MTB's are a lower pressure application, so the actual formulas they're using may not be a good fit for tubeless road, but some of the guys in that thread got really into the chemistry of sealant and sort of reverse engineering what each element does. That might give you some ideas about additives you could use to extend the sealant life. A comparison between regular Orange Seal, and Orange Endurance might be somewhat illuminating too, as one could see what they've changed in the stock formula to extend the lifespan.

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Calnago
Posts: 8608
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

I think you may have been referring to me when I posted in one of the tubular threads about using this neoprene seal Cement that I got from a Dive Shop. Haven’t got a lot of long term experience with it yet but so far seems to be as good as anything I’ve used in the past, hopefully better...
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by Weenie


zefs
Posts: 438
Joined: Sat Aug 05, 2017 8:40 pm

by zefs

As it has been mentioned, if you need extra protection from the sealant you need to use a thicker one and refill more often.
I rarely puncture (1-2/year) and when I get one it's small, so a watery sealant (like Bontrager TLR) does the job and lasts half a year.

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