Myth: Wide Tires Need Wide Rims:

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
Lugan
Posts: 173
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2011 9:02 pm

by Lugan

I've only seen Old Blewitt Pass Road dissecting the new Hwy 97; never ridden it. Didn't even know it was a doable road riding route, but thanks, now I know!

Another local Seattle area example (sorry to the others) to agree with your point immediately above about picking the all-around fastest wheels and tires for a given ride. Saturday I am doing a group ride from roughly Marymoor to where the pavement ends in the far east on Middle Fork Snoqualmie Road. It's 92 miles and 3,800' of climbing on mostly good roads. We're riding base endurance pace mostly, so aero is less of a concern, and I'll ride my Mosaic, but will switch the wheelset to another with 50mm deep rims and ProOne 25c tubeless because they're plenty comfortable, they handle almost as well as the wheels with 28c tires, and they are probably overall fastest. Good to have choices.

by Weenie


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Calnago
Posts: 8608
Joined: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:14 pm

by Calnago

Lugan, before you go heading out all excited to do the Old Blewitt Pass, I will say that I haven't done it in some time now, and if you're comparing things to Cougar Mountain and the roads around Sammamish, well, the Old Blewitt Pass at this point may actually not be "doable" road riding. We used to do it in lieu of the main highway on an annual organized ride, against the directors orders as there was no support there and there are always liability concerns. So, if you do go up to do it, don't come back saying I said it was fine road to descend on a road bike. "Doable" is a very subjective word :beerchug: .
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
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anykarthik
Posts: 79
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2018 10:37 pm

by anykarthik

I like technical descending. As a Seattle resident as well, going down roads like Zoo hill is peak cycling for me. I tend to be in the top 1-2% for descents (and significantly worse in the other direction). On Zoo, for example, 11/400 this year and I lost ~4 seconds after running up onto a slow moving car at the bottom. Mud mountain at the end of Ramrod, #1 for the year so far.

My equipment of choice is a 2019 Venge with the stock Rovals (21mm internal width). Tires are Hutchinson Fusion Perf tubeless 25f, 28r. They measure out at 27f, 30r. I weight about 155lb and air the tires up to about 75psi on both ends. I used to ride at 90psi on my old Ridley (which also had wide Ardennes for the wheels), but the Venge is a rougher ride and 75 feels better.

Having a wide rim (and the effect it has on tire shape and associated impact on the ride) is one of my highest requirements for me to derive joy out of my bike. Based on my comparison against narrower (say 15-17mm internal width) rims on the Ridley, the confidence I get from the wider wheels is simply not something I would want to give up - any negative effects on aero / rolling resistance / weight be damned.

jlok
Posts: 1086
Joined: Tue Jun 30, 2015 3:30 am

by jlok

anykarthik wrote:
Thu Aug 22, 2019 9:34 pm
I like technical descending. As a Seattle resident as well, going down roads like Zoo hill is peak cycling for me. I tend to be in the top 1-2% for descents (and significantly worse in the other direction). On Zoo, for example, 11/400 this year and I lost ~4 seconds after running up onto a slow moving car at the bottom. Mud mountain at the end of Ramrod, #1 for the year so far.

My equipment of choice is a 2019 Venge with the stock Rovals (21mm internal width). Tires are Hutchinson Fusion Perf tubeless 25f, 28r. They measure out at 27f, 30r. I weight about 155lb and air the tires up to about 75psi on both ends. I used to ride at 90psi on my old Ridley (which also had wide Ardennes for the wheels), but the Venge is a rougher ride and 75 feels better.

Having a wide rim (and the effect it has on tire shape and associated impact on the ride) is one of my highest requirements for me to derive joy out of my bike. Based on my comparison against narrower (say 15-17mm internal width) rims on the Ridley, the confidence I get from the wider wheels is simply not something I would want to give up - any negative effects on aero / rolling resistance / weight be damned.
I'm with you. Wide rims and tires plus disc brake are great for technical descending. I enjoy it very much.
Litespeed T1sl Disc / BMC TM02 < Giant Propel Advanced SL Disc 1 < Propel Adv < TCR Adv SL Disc < KTM Revelator Sky < CAAD 12 Disc < Domane S Disc < Alize < CAAD 10

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