Is there a better aero wheel than a Campy Ultra 50 out there?

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
Foxman50
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by Foxman50

I wasn’t aware that was removable, they are now back at the shop and it was the first thing they did.

It does sound like something plastic in there and not metalic though hard to tell. Will see if they are able to clear it.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Regardless of brand it’s not uncommon for a small piece of carbon left over from the manufacturing process to be bouncing around in there. If it’s actually loose, then I’ve never not been able to get it out. While I’ve used vacuum power in the past I found that the quickest and most effective way is to just start banging the wheel downward, sideways, whatever against a firm carpeted floor with the valve hole at the bottom until it makes its way down there and shakes out. Had the same thing occur with alloy rims and a small shard left over from the manufacturing process. So annoying if you leave it in.
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by Weenie


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JKolmo
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by JKolmo

+1 on Calnago’s post. I’ve had the exact same issue with two new pairs of Bora 35s. Fixed it the exact same way. Ultimately that carbon left over piece will come out by centrifugal force holding the rim in both hands valve hole away from you and give it a good swing.

Foxman50
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Joined: Sat Jun 15, 2019 9:40 pm

by Foxman50

While ive tried plenty of rattling, thrashing and swinging i draw the line at banging £2K+ said wheels on floor.

Will leave that to others while wheels are out of my sight.

While I fully appreciate things like this happen, my complaint really is this, if a company is going to shout about its quality control then it better back it up. Scratches on one wheel and a foreign object in the other does not speak of quality, but then maybe im old fashioned.

Anyway this wasn’t meant to turn into a Campy bashing post, just good to share experiences.

Catagory6
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by Catagory6

AAARRGH!!
i get conflicting information everywhere i read about tubular tires
brand/model/width... i read good and bad about everything

please... SOMEONE... just tell me what to get for my new wheels

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kgt
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by kgt

Just get a pair of 25mm Continental Sprinters. Not something exceptional but very good in every aspect, and cheap.

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dj97223
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by dj97223

Catagory6 wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 4:24 am
AAARRGH!!
i get conflicting information everywhere i read about tubular tires
brand/model/width... i read good and bad about everything

please... SOMEONE... just tell me what to get for my new wheels
OK, we've been holding back, but now that you've said please, here's the scoop :D : For the Boras made after 2015, with the wider rim, get the Veloflex 25mm. A perfect compromise width and, if you are new to tubulars, they will be easier to mount than the Continentals and, in my experience, more puncture resistant than the top-level Vittoria's. :beerchug:
“If you save your breath I feel a man like you can manage it. And if you don't manage it, you'll die. Only slowly, very slowly, old friend.”

alcatraz
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by alcatraz

Shh.. That's supposed to be a secret!!

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Yeah, stick to Veloflex Arrenbergs (25mm) or, if you want tan sidewalls, -Velofelx Roubaix (also 25mm, same tire as Arrenberg but with tan sidewalls).
Or, and preferably, the brand new Veloflex Servizio Corse, in either tan or black wall, 25mm. I believe these tires actually replace the Arrenbergs and Roubaixs above.
Make your first experience on Boras a good one, from ease of mounting (Continentals are a bear to mount in comparison to Veloflex), to joy of riding, the newest Veloflex I’m guessing are a superb tire to ride, supposedly even nicer than the Arrenbergs or Roubaix, but I have not had the pleasure of trying them out yet. You could be one of the first. Do it!
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
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Catagory6
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by Catagory6

Calnago wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 11:30 pm
Yeah, stick to Veloflex Arrenbergs (25mm) or, if you want tan sidewalls, -Velofelx Roubaix (also 25mm, same tire as Arrenberg but with tan sidewalls).
Or, and preferably, the brand new Veloflex Servizio Corse, in either tan or black wall, 25mm. I believe these tires actually replace the Arrenbergs and Roubaixs above.
Make your first experience on Boras a good one, from ease of mounting (Continentals are a bear to mount in comparison to Veloflex), to joy of riding, the newest Veloflex I’m guessing are a superb tire to ride, supposedly even nicer than the Arrenbergs or Roubaix, but I have not had the pleasure of trying them out yet. You could be one of the first. Do it!
how well would a vlaanderen/raven (27mm) do in terms of mounting/mating profile?
i'm thinking for the rear wheel, for extra protection, and wear

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Calnago
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by Calnago

It’s a perfectly fine fit. I had Vlanderens mounted on a set of Boras for a while. They are 27mm. I’m 200+ lbs and ran the rear at 80psi and the front less than 75psi. But I removed them in favor of going back to the 25mm Arrenbergs. Gave the Vlanderens to a friend. They were very soft and plush, and perhaps if I was always riding on really coarse fresh chipseal I’d consider them again. But the roads I ride are generally pretty good, and I prefer the feel of the 25mm Arrenbergs. The 26mm Specialized S-works Turbo Griptons are a good choice as well. But even the tread on the Vlanderens screams “Please use me on less than decent pavement or cobbles.”
Oh, if you do go with the Vlanderens, practice mounting a few times just to get a feel for how easy they mount on a rim. The larger volume tubulars just go on without much difficulty at all so if you try to stretch them on the rim like you might normally when mounting an Arrenberg for example, you could actually end up with a high spot at the opposite side of the valve. It’s just the opposite with say a Conti Comp, which is undoubtedly the toughest tubular to mount that I’ve ever experienced for sure. I really do like the Conti Comp rubber compound for our wet winters however, so that is my tire for the wet weather wheels despite the difficult mounting.
Personally I really don’t like two significantly different feeling tires on front/rear, which is what you would have with a Vlanderen/Arrenberg combo. But that’s your call.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
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3Pio
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by 3Pio

Calnago wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 2:39 am

Oh, if you do go with the Vlanderens, practice mounting a few times just to get a feel for how easy they mount on a rim. The larger volume tubulars just go on without much difficulty at all so if you try to stretch them on the rim like you might normally when mounting an Arrenberg for example, you could actually end up with a high spot at the opposite side of the valve. It’s just the opposite with say a Conti Comp, which is undoubtedly the toughest tubular to mount that I’ve ever experienced for sure.I really do like the Conti Comp rubber compound for our wet winters however, so that is my tire for the wet weather wheels despite the difficult mounting.

At a moment im streching Continental Comp tire (about 11-12 bars on my old broken clincher rim)... I streched this same tire when i bought it few months ago (it was streching there for at least week or more), but i have stepped extension valve back then and got deflated (and strechig process ended).. So i replaced the extension valve, checked that is ok and forgot it (i was busy or something, so forgot to put it back on the streching rim).

But last week, when i tried to put the same (allready streched tire as i explained) on the same streching rim, it was so hard to do it.. Like no streched at all (probably because few months since that streching, maybe tire get back in original form before the streching..)...

This tire will replace my front Continental Sprinter tire (where i have now 7250 km puncture free), and probaby will be riden from very hot weather (which we have now), to cold weather in few months from now... U said u like Comp for cold weather.. But how is for very hot?

Not so suitable for very hot weather in term of not having good grip, or not lasting to much on this kind of weather?

And sice u said this is toughest mountain tubular, how to make this process easier? For now i have experience with Conti Sprinters (not too bad to mount them), and Vittoria Corsa G+ (very easy to mount them)..


Thanks

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Calnago
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by Calnago

@3Pio: toughest “mounting”, not mountain, tire is what I presume you meant. No, I have not found a way to make the process “easier”. Re stretching, while I don’t even worry too much about whether a Veloflex is pre stretched or not, this is not so with a Conti Comp. You say you use an old clincher rim for stretching. I’ve always stretched them on tubular rims, because I’ve had them. But also because it would seem that the tubular might not get as good a stretch on a clincher rim as it would just relax in the deeper valley that probably most clincher rims have, so not really stretching it at all. But still, I presume it’s mostly that it’s just a Conti Comp.
Regarding hot vs cold. Wasn’t so much the temp I was referring to, but more that I feel the Conti Comp just seems to feel “good” on really wet roads, if you can imagine anything really feeling “good” in the pouring rain. I know Conti Comps get a pretty bad rap ridewise, but i don’t know... in bad weather it’s hard to be cruising joyfully along thinking about the subtle difference in ride quality a nicer tubular with a latex innertube might make (the Conti’s, at least the ones available to the public, have butyl innertubes). And when the roads are drenched in water etc, you’re not going to be cornering the same way you might if the roads were dry no matter which tires you’re on, and that is really where the difference in handling of a nice tubular will really shine. So no, there’s nothing wrong with the Conti’s in hot weather vs cold, just that maybe the suppleness of a different tubular may be better appreciated in the nicer weather, when you can think about and appreciate things other than how cold and wet and miserable you are.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
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3Pio
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by 3Pio

Toughest Mounting for Tough Mountain climb :) will be better.. Yes.. I mean mounting...


Thanks, seem that i'll have to excersise my thumbs to be able to properly mount, i hoped that little magic exist (maybe im lucky since here is really hot, so maybe to just put on the sunshine for a while before mounting)


And must to mention that mounting on that clincher rim which i use for streching, this was toughest tire by now.. While i never ever had a problems to put there Corsa's and Sprinters, Competition was such a pain.. I can imagine how much harder will be to install properly on tub rim with glue etc...

But what have to be done, will be done...

by Weenie


Catagory6
Posts: 384
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2017 2:36 am

by Catagory6

just got back from my maiden voyage with the One 35 tubular set, and i have to be honest. i was entirely underwhelmed. taped on Arenberg/Raven (f/r) with the effetto mariposa, so maybe that's the reason (taping instead of glue). but they felt more sluggish than the Belgium+/240/GP4K wheels i normally run, despite being 220g lighter.
things seemed to improve around 25mph. but i would have to do a back-to-back comparison, because it wasn't blatantly noticeable

i'm sorry to report such uninspiring findings. maybe i need to do the back-to-back test?

they do make a delightful sound when braking. and they make my bicycle look 10 times faster, when standing still

somehow the spinning carbon rim interferes with my heart rate monitor, polar s720i

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