Super light alloy clincher rims?

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Slammed
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Joined: Sun Feb 01, 2015 12:32 am

by Slammed

I'm in the process of building a sub 4.5kg road bike and I'm trying to do it with clinchers. What are my options for really light alloy rims? From my research the AC mag rims are the lightest "available" rim and the old Stan's 340s are a heavier but somewhat easier to find rim. Are there any other rims I should be looking for? I have some light hubs in 16h and 20h front, and 24h rear so I'd like to stick to those hole counts.

by Weenie


alcatraz
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Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

Light alloy is fairly useless. It will ruin 80% of the bike's performance and you won't get under 5kg.

Go with carbon tubulars. That way you won't have an accident descending on 700gr wheels.

bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

I don't think I can be bothered answering this. Sub 4.5 kg requires a thought out build.

Slammed
Posts: 92
Joined: Sun Feb 01, 2015 12:32 am

by Slammed

bm0p700f wrote:
Thu Mar 28, 2019 7:04 pm
I don't think I can be bothered answering this. Sub 4.5 kg requires a thought out build.
Why not? I have about a third of the parts already and from the spreadsheet I have I should be pretty close to 4.5kg. This is more of a project bike than a daily driver, and I don't weigh much do everything is tuned and pretty light.

alcatraz
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by alcatraz

Why alloy clinchers?

You'd be pressed to find any bike under 5kg with clinchers.

You will be paying a fortune for parts elsewhere on the bike and have huge weight saving potential lost in your wheels to try and reach your goal.

(All my bikes are clinchers)

Slammed
Posts: 92
Joined: Sun Feb 01, 2015 12:32 am

by Slammed

alcatraz wrote:
Fri Mar 29, 2019 1:12 am
Why alloy clinchers?

You'd be pressed to find any bike under 5kg with clinchers.

You will be paying a fortune for parts elsewhere on the bike and have huge weight saving potential lost in your wheels to try and reach your goal.

(All my bikes are clinchers)
I'd rather have clinchers because they are just more practical. All of the parts for the bike are extremely light so as long as the wheels are close to 1000g I should be fine. I'm pretty light and I live in the prairies so I can get away with some really light stuff.

shimmeD
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Location: eNZed

by shimmeD

You already have Stan's on your list, which may be lightest. Seek out Kinlin's options as well, and perhaps Easton.
I have carbon tubs to Bitex hubs 20/24. The weight spread is 290/222/532=1,044g being hubs/spokes/rims.
Less is more.

alcatraz
Posts: 2057
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

Alloy clinchers won't get to 1000gr.

With extralite hubs and titanium spokes you are looking at 1100gr.

A tubular carbon wheelset at 790gr will be way way WAY better than an alloy at 1100gr. It will actually be rideable not just for display.

Donald here on the forum uses hard to find magnesium clincher rims to save weight.

Slammed
Posts: 92
Joined: Sun Feb 01, 2015 12:32 am

by Slammed

alcatraz wrote:
Fri Mar 29, 2019 8:28 am
Alloy clinchers won't get to 1000gr.

With extralite hubs and titanium spokes you are looking at 1100gr.

A tubular carbon wheelset at 790gr will be way way WAY better than an alloy at 1100gr. It will actually be rideable not just for display.

Donald here on the forum uses hard to find magnesium clincher rims to save weight.
My spokes, hubs, and nipples are well under 280g so I only need the rims to be under 360g to break a kilo. I could do it with tubulars but I think 4.5kg with clinchers is a lot more impressive. I haven't gotten a single rim reccomendation yet so I might just end up with tubulars anyway :noidea:

fromtrektocolnago
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Joined: Sat Dec 07, 2013 10:15 pm

by fromtrektocolnago

+1 on alloy clinchers. they brake better. disc is the solution to carbon rim brake set-ups. i waited for disc before getting carbon.
it may not be the lightest but i've been very happy with my dura ace c-24's
Colnago C-59 (Dura Ace)
Firefly(Ultegra)
Colnago C-64 disc(ultegra) with Bora 35 wheels

Etienne
Posts: 169
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 11:41 am
Location: France

by Etienne

Slammed wrote:
Fri Mar 29, 2019 5:18 pm
My spokes, hubs, and nipples are well under 280g so I only need the rims to be under 360g to break a kilo. I could do it with tubulars but I think 4.5kg with clinchers is a lot more impressive. I haven't gotten a single rim reccomendation yet so I might just end up with tubulars anyway :noidea:
Is it going to be a display wheelset just to be at 4.5kg or do you plan to ride the bike ?

I ask because a 360g alloy rim with 16 to 24 spokes will just be very difficult to build and if not tensioned correctly, just simply unridable and I don't even mention reliability and so on.

... believe me, back in the days I've built 330g tubular alloy rims (Mavix cx18 for instance) with 32 spokes and I had a hard time getting them tensioned and trued, just one quarter of a nipple turn and they turned from nearly perfect to bretzel :mrgreen:

The only rims that were more difficult to deal with have been wood rims ... super nice and classy, but a total mess.

Slammed
Posts: 92
Joined: Sun Feb 01, 2015 12:32 am

by Slammed

Etienne wrote:
Fri Mar 29, 2019 5:47 pm
Slammed wrote:
Fri Mar 29, 2019 5:18 pm
My spokes, hubs, and nipples are well under 280g so I only need the rims to be under 360g to break a kilo. I could do it with tubulars but I think 4.5kg with clinchers is a lot more impressive. I haven't gotten a single rim reccomendation yet so I might just end up with tubulars anyway :noidea:
Is it going to be a display wheelset just to be at 4.5kg or do you plan to ride the bike ?

I ask because a 360g alloy rim with 16 to 24 spokes will just be very difficult to build and if not tensioned correctly, just simply unridable and I don't even mention reliability and so on.

... believe me, back in the days I've built 330g tubular alloy rims (Mavix cx18 for instance) with 32 spokes and I had a hard time getting them tensioned and trued, just one quarter of a nipple turn and they turned from nearly perfect to bretzel :mrgreen:

The only rims that were more difficult to deal with have been wood rims ... super nice and classy, but a total mess.
It will be more of a show/project bike than something ridden daily. I'll probably ride these no more than 1000km a year on flat coffee shop spins.

joejack951
Posts: 531
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Location: Wilmington, DE

by joejack951

Not sure which drilling you are after [nevermind, I need to pay attention!] nor do I know where to point you to find a pair but American Classic Sprint 350 rims are ride-able, at least when built with 28-32 spokes, and I believe around 350 grams for the rim. I have a pair of the built wheels from ~2005 that I ought to do something with.

Slammed
Posts: 92
Joined: Sun Feb 01, 2015 12:32 am

by Slammed

joejack951 wrote:
Fri Mar 29, 2019 6:54 pm
Not sure which drilling you are after [nevermind, I need to pay attention!] nor do I know where to point you to find a pair but American Classic Sprint 350 rims are ride-able, at least when built with 28-32 spokes, and I believe around 350 grams for the rim. I have a pair of the built wheels from ~2005 that I ought to do something with.
Thanks for the suggestion. I didn't know about those rims and they seem fairly easy to come by. I'd probably use the 28h for the rear and lace a 16h hub to the 32h rim for the front. 16 spokes on the front seems pretty sketchy but I've seen people do it on lighter rims so it should be fine.

Nefarious86
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by Nefarious86

I love the commitment but I hope your dental is up to date....

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