Ultimate training tubular setup

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
kgibbo1868
Posts: 328
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2012 6:36 pm

by kgibbo1868

I was thinking of a new set of training wheels, I want to run tubular 28's (Veloflex Raven) on and am wondering if anyone has advice for rim / hub combo? I am thinking of 28/28 spoke count. I don't mind if they are a bit expensive as long as theyt are GOOD! :-)

I want:
1. Comfort
2. Robust
3. Durable
4. Easy to service
5. Rim brake
Last edited by kgibbo1868 on Thu Jan 31, 2019 5:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
2019 Baum Ristretto
Pain is my friend!

bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

Kinlin tb20

Cheap and good.

Hed Belgium c2 tubular is ace but pricey.

bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

Don't forget the Ambrosio nemesis. The wet braking on these is as good as it gets.

alcatraz
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by alcatraz

Brass nipples and a conservative spoke count should be reliable.

Hubs with larger bearings for the wheel should have longer service interval.

You probably don't want the thinnest spokes for an alloy rim for a robust build. Get the next step.

Comfort can't really be addressed other than perhaps rim width. On the subject I'm curious to know what would be more comfortable for a 28mm tubular tire. A wider or a narrower rim? Any difference at all?

For speed better not have a much different rim and tire width.

Marin
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by Marin

Why would you train on tubulars?

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LouisN
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Location: Canada

by LouisN

What's your definition of '' a bit expensive'' (budget) ?
Could be lots of options.
And What kind of use/roads ?
For starters, I love the idea of using Raven's (if your bike can take 27 mm tires: Don't know why, but their tubular version lists it at 27 mm).

Louis :)

ninjabrewer
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Oct 24, 2015 7:15 pm

by ninjabrewer

I am working towards the same, sort of. I found HED Belgium on sale, Miche hubset (Syntesi) and will be using Sapim race spokes. (28, x2). Already have a clincher set with the same hubset and spokes( 32 x3). That set has been perfect since I built them up about 3-4 years ago.

kgibbo1868
Posts: 328
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2012 6:36 pm

by kgibbo1868

I prefer tubulars for a few reasons, ride and handling being the main reason. I enjoy the gluing process and don’t actually see a downside to them.
The roads I ride on are fairly decent but not the smoothest. Quite a bit of chip seal here but at least there is not much for tyre slicing debris about.
There are very few flat roads here, not mountain but lots of hills.
My budget is $1500 Aus.


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2019 Baum Ristretto
Pain is my friend!

shimmeD
Posts: 487
Joined: Thu Jun 28, 2012 10:52 pm
Location: eNZed

by shimmeD

I ride my 2011/2 Bora full-time in our summer, so you could say they're training tubulars. This should be an option especailly if it doesn't rain all the time where you live & ride. I've built a set of 23x25mm Farsport but I'm still waiting for an auspicious date to christen it: I also mean the Bora is doing great.
Less is more.

kgibbo1868
Posts: 328
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2012 6:36 pm

by kgibbo1868

I could ride my D/A C50 tubs all the time (Veloflex 25's) but I wanted something shallower and 28's for everyday riding. They will be going on a Baum Ristretto.
2019 Baum Ristretto
Pain is my friend!

shimmeD
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by shimmeD

I definitely refuse to take your money. In my eyes your DAs are the perfect training buddies, and look absolutely smashing on a Ristretto. Why ride shallower (you don't live in a place as windy as I do!)? :lol: I'm all out to bash consumerism: want not waste not!
Less is more.

AndreLM
Posts: 359
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2013 11:53 pm

by AndreLM

I fully understand you. A few years ago, I got some Zipp tubulars, and a set of handbuilt Aluminum rims ( v1 Pacenti SL23) laced to WI T11 hubs. I ended up riding the tubulars much more than the clinchers: I never had a flat around here, and they roll much better than any clincher I had.

I also hated dealing with tubeless sealant, or trying to mount standard clinchers with tubes on the Pacentis, so I rebuilt the wheels using the WI hubs and a set of HED Belgium tubulars. This is in my wife's bike now, and she is loving it.

I considered using the Kinlin as well, but just found the HED at a great price that I couldn't pass. You should be able to get a similar build within your budget.
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LouisN
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by LouisN

Baum paint jobs are usually pretty high quality. One of my favourite frames. Matte or glossy finish ?
Maybe you can match it with some nice shiny colored Chris King or Industry Nine hubs 28/28h, laced to matte black rims.
I have some Kinlin TB20 rims and I really like them, best ''bang for buck'' rims out there.
Mine are the previous edition ones ( ano finish ) wich is their only down side, the finish was not durable.
Now they have the matte sand blast finish, but I can't tell if it's more durable and tougher.
it should fit in your ''budget''.
The HED Belgium sure are great rims too.

Louis :)

kgibbo1868
Posts: 328
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2012 6:36 pm

by kgibbo1868

I am leaning towards the Head C2s, but not sure on hubs....


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RyanH
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by RyanH

I think for performance the Heds should be a little stiffer and responsive than Nemesis but Nemesis are quite the joy to ride. Extremely supple ride with a nice brake feel and unique looks.
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