Tubeless Disc Options driving me mad - I'm in too deep!

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
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thecraig
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 8:00 am

by thecraig

I have well and truly gone down the rabbit hole with this one. I fell into the trap of looking only at the numbers (weight, depth etc.) and by looking through all of the posts here realised I've neglected the intangibles - stiffness, feel and reliability.

I'm looking for a circa 1400gm disc wheelset for an Emonda ALR5 Disc. Located in Australia if that helps.

Requirements:
- I'm 95kgs
- Mostly hill climb so max 30mm deep
- Want to run 25 or 30mm tyres so reasonably wide rim
- Alloy or carbon rim - just want it safe
- Around $1000 AUD

The options I've looked at:
- DT Swiss ER 1400 (good weight / 240 hubs)
- Custom build using DT Swiss rr421db rim, 240 front hub, 350 rear hub (no idea on spokes - love some recommendations)
- Same combo of hubs above using a Chinese carbon rim
- Hunt Aero light (not sure on hubs)

I'm not elite by any stretch and don't warrant the best of the best - but just want something reliable that will help on the climbs.

if you were in my shoes, which way would you go?

Thanks mates!

NickJHP
Posts: 223
Joined: Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:22 am
Location: Canberra, Australia

by NickJHP

I'm also in Australia, and built myself a set of 24/28 disc wheels last year using the following components:

DT Swiss 240s 28h rear hub (on sale cheap from r2-bike)
Hope RS4 straight pull 24h front hub (also on sale cheap from r2-bike)
Light Bicycle RRU25 carbon rims - 18mm internal width, 25mm depth
Sapim CX-Ray spokes and DT Squorx nipples (also from r2-bike)

Built-up weight, according to my kitchen scales, with tubeless rim tape but without valves installed, is 650g front wheel and 780g rear wheel (1430g total). Total cost of the components was about $AU960. If you're getting someone else to do the build then you'd have to add whatever that costs - I have no idea what wheelbuilders charge as I've always built my own. I got Light Bicycle to apply their logo to the rims in orange, but you can choose the colour you want, or get them without any logo at all.

I've had zero problems with the wheels in about six months of use, but my weight is 65kg. However, I also have half a dozen trouble-free years on a pair of Dura-Ace C24 rim-brake wheels, which are spoked 16/20, so these at 24/28 are probably overbuilt for my weight, though I do ride them over the occasional gravel road. some of which are quite corrugated:

Image

by Weenie


bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

Given the op weight I would go with a deeper rim. They are stiffer laterally and radially so a longer lasting wheel should result.

I know the rim weight of my own rims so I will use these as an example.

45mm deep 26mm wide tubeless compatible and the latest version should be 465g with carbon Ti X hub disc and CX ray spokes these will be 1465g.

Lighter rims exist but you may start to compromise of the durability of the rims or on spoke life for shallower rims or both.

The DT hubs are not the lightest and will force you to pick a lighter rim to achieve your weight goal.

Also you would be surprised how little very low weight wheels helps someone like you on a climb.

Marin
Posts: 3409
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:48 am
Location: Vienna Austria

by Marin

thecraig wrote:
Tue Jan 29, 2019 6:29 am
I'm looking for a circa 1400gm disc wheelset for an Emonda ALR5 Disc. Located in Australia if that helps.

Requirements:
- I'm 95kgs
You're looking for a 1500g -1600g wheelset, then you'll be bombproof. 1400g at your weight is a compromise.

alcatraz
Posts: 1914
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

If I were you I'd get a branded alloy wheelset.

The reason to go custom is to optimize for weight and save money getting a better rim profile. I don't really see you having the need for either.

I think with 95kg, not being performance oriented, and setting a pretty soft limit of 1400gr you'll find the branded wheelsets (even second hand) to fit your requirements. They'll often (but not without exception) provide you with good braking and good stiffness.

Get the widest alloy rim you can find. At least 24mm but preferably wider. Check weight limit. You'll often find the branded wheelsets to be around 100-120kg weight limit. In your alley.

If you want a bit of aero benefit look at around 30mm tall rims without sharp edges. Width is key at your weight. 28mm wide tire on a 23mm wide rim is going to be slow and exhibit poor performance.

The aero fruit hangs very low on shallow wheels. Just going with a rounder, not box shaped, profile 30 mm or over, and enough width to match the ideal tire ~25-28mm, will add only 100-150gr to the wheelset but give you a big chunk of comfort and free speed.

bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

Marin is correct with DT Swiss Hope or my own disc brake hubs you bee in the 1530g ish set range for the deeper carbon set. With an alloy set it will be over 1600g if you want long term depnedability as either rim needs to be heavier for a low spoke count or for a lighter rim a higher spoke count is needed. There is no magic bullet.

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otoman
Posts: 449
Joined: Wed Sep 17, 2008 6:25 pm
Location: Nashville

by otoman

With that body weight and aluminum bike, you’re wasting your money if you think you’ll do any better in hill climbs with lighter wheels.

A lighter wheel will feel snappier but the math isn’t in your favor for any sort of meaningful time reductions.

Just lose weight. No alcohol, no sweets. Bam, there’s 5kg at least. Sorry I’m so blunt, I am probably a bit grumpy from my own lack of alcohol and sweets
Age and treachery shall overcome youth and skill

thecraig
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 8:00 am

by thecraig

You are all correct - I will heed your advice and combine a reasonable wheel set of 1500 - 1600 with (sigh) less food, alcohol and all the other things I enjoy lol.

As mentioned, the longer you look into things the more you get infatuated with numbers.

Thanks for the metaphorical slap across the face (as per the movies) to bring me back to reality!!!

Craig

jfranci3
Posts: 584
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2016 5:21 pm

by jfranci3

Just get the DT Swiss. I’m 86kg and my r32 disc wheelset has been maintenance free, while I’ve destroyed Mavic and Fulcrum on Chicago potholes. I think they’re rated for 120kg and 15cm drops.

vanmatthew
Posts: 82
Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2016 5:20 am

by vanmatthew

Starbike sells the FFWD 30mm carbon tubeless disc that supports up to 110kg. The DT350 version is 1490 grams and the DT240 version is 1430 grams. Pricing isn't too crazy.

1300 for the DT350 version. The rim brake version got 4.5 stars on bikeradar or road.cc. Can probably save a few more grams and make the wheels more responsive by upgrading to the 36T rachet for like 50 bucks.

vanmatthew
Posts: 82
Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2016 5:20 am

by vanmatthew

Lacing for the FFWD is 24/24 with I think with high end aero spokes.

by Weenie


thecraig
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 8:00 am

by thecraig

Thanks for the extra options - will look at both.

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