Deep rims with alloy braking?

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
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dastott
Posts: 178
Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2015 12:35 pm

by dastott

Planning to build my first wheelset using some recycled Tune hubs (20h/24h) I picked up secondhand (Mig 70/Mag 170). This is a budget alloy build so I have almost settled on DT Swiss RR 511 rims as they are 32mm deep albeit a bit heavy. Will also use CN Mac 494 spokes to make a stiff wheel as these will used on an aero bike on rolling courses. However, I am wondering if there are any deeper rims available with alloy braking? I am 70kgs. Cheers.

by Weenie


alcatraz
Posts: 2145
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

Will be a very solid build I think. (I'd wait for the professional wheelbuilders to comment before ordering though.)

There are carbon rims with alloy brake tracks that are lighter. I'm thinking of chinese rims but there must be some big brands too.

I've used cnspokes for many years and they are fine. I'm sure someone will tell you to go sapim or something, no need. :D

Those hubs are pretty light. How about using them on a climbing wheelset, and get a full carbon wheelset for rolling flats? Depends if it rains a lot, then I'd understand if you like to stay on alloy.

dastott
Posts: 178
Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2015 12:35 pm

by dastott

Thanks. I already have tubs for hillclimb races (1000g) and Mavic Ksyrium SLR (1400g) for the climbing bike, and 60mm Farsports clinchers for the aero bike. I want a spare wheelset for the aero bike, and recycle the decent hubs that are currently laced to a damaged wheelset. Don't like carbon clincher braking TBH and don't trust myself to make a light wheelset at a first attempt. Want something sturdy and reliable.

alcatraz
Posts: 2145
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

Even the chinese use high temp resins now. It's getting harder and harder to cook a rim

Yet it still happens. You're in the danger zone if you are heavy, if you drag your brakes, or if you're riding a certain wheelset in a mountainous region for the first time.

For touring even in mountainous regions it's also possible to run a carbon/alloy hybrid only in front. That's the rim that is most likely to be cooked anyway. The rear is the place where you most need the benefit of carbon = stiffness. Sure it'd look funky but it'd be a solid combination.

dim
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Location: Cambridge UK

by dim

Trek Emonda SL6
Miyata One Thousand

morganb
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Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 5:30 pm

by morganb

Kinlin XR31T or AForce AL33 are both proven semi-aero aluminum options. Otherwise you could do Chinese hybrid construction rims if you want to go deeper than 33mm.

bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

I would also suggest the Kinlin XR31T. The aforce rim is the other option but at a price. I have not built woith the A force rim but compared to the DT rim the kinlin can retain a tubeless tyre that has been seated with soapy water only (no sealant) and require proper force to push off. The same tyre unseats or unseats easily depending on the tyre from the DT rim. Sealant often glues the tubeless tyre in place on the DT rim which is why people think they are tubeless compatible however the kinlin has better compatibility and its lighter. The rear is available in asymmetric form too which increase radial stiffness.

The kinlin I admit does benefit from the kool stop salmon pads though. softer pads seem to work better with this rim.

morganb
Posts: 667
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 5:30 pm

by morganb

Tubeless retention on the AForce is also very good. Its a true road tubeless rim unlike a lot of others, like the DTs as you have mentioned and what I've seen with Rovals among others(can very easily push the bead off the shelf).

dastott
Posts: 178
Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2015 12:35 pm

by dastott

Thanks for the info guys, much appreciated and given me something to think about. Was also wondering about red Veloplugs and if they'll actually fit in the DT Swiss wheel? And would latex tubes actually play nicely with Veloplugs?

alcatraz
Posts: 2145
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

Veloplugs don't puncture latex tubes unless they have a sharp edge or something. They don't always follow the same curve in the rim bed.

With tubeless rims it's sometimes hard to use veloplugs because you have that weird profile. I still do it and no problem. I like the veloplug copies better because they are a bit smaller, fit tubeless rims better and the locking mechanism is better. There is virtually no risk of one accidentally falling off when you fix a flat, which isn't the best feature of original veloplugs.

There are many kinds of "veloplugs". If the diameter is too small you will find none of the original veloplugs will fit. They only go down to about 8mm and I've had rims with 7.5mm

I don't know what diameter holes the dt rims are.

When you use veloplugs with new rims make sure you check the rim bed for sharp edges, like a hawk! :D Under the hooks, at the rim join point and by the valve hole. Grind or sand down anything suspicious.

JoO
Posts: 167
Joined: Thu May 04, 2017 7:30 am

by JoO

alcatraz wrote:
Wed Jan 30, 2019 1:18 am
Veloplugs don't puncture latex tubes unless they have a sharp edge or something. They don't always follow the same curve in the rim bed.

With tubeless rims it's sometimes hard to use veloplugs because you have that weird profile. I still do it and no problem. I like the veloplug copies better because they are a bit smaller, fit tubeless rims better and the locking mechanism is better. There is virtually no risk of one accidentally falling off when you fix a flat, which isn't the best feature of original veloplugs.

There are many kinds of "veloplugs". If the diameter is too small you will find none of the original veloplugs will fit. They only go down to about 8mm and I've had rims with 7.5mm

I don't know what diameter holes the dt rims are.

When you use veloplugs with new rims make sure you check the rim bed for sharp edges, like a hawk! :D Under the hooks, at the rim join point and by the valve hole. Grind or sand down anything suspicious.
I have had several punctures with er Swiss r460 rims with yellow veloplugs and vreeestein latex inner tubes. 1 layer of paper masking tape solved the problem.

by Weenie


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