Why tubular?

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
fabriciom
Posts: 155
Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2015 8:42 pm
Location: Madrid, España

by fabriciom

alcatraz wrote:
Tue Jan 15, 2019 3:29 pm
Will riding on a flat tubular destroy any chance of repairing the inner tube? Would be an expensive flat no?
I have done this and the intertube has survide.

I attempted to repair a couple of tubes and it always failed. So now I just replace complete tyre. Expensive, yes. But I usually only get flats when the tyre is wasted.

Still worth it because of how confortable it is compared to a clincher.

Havent tried tubeless...

by Weenie


bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

These are not the pro one which is s tubeless tyre. This is the one tubular which is a different beady all together. I don't rate the pro one or the one clincher but neither do I like the gatorskin clincher but the tubular version is totally different and alot less shit.

aeroisnteverything
Posts: 169
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:43 pm

by aeroisnteverything

Calnago wrote:
Tue Jan 15, 2019 4:24 pm

I just put the pen there for scale, it’s really small and fits easily and comfortably in my jersey pocket. For comparison, my iPhone 10 which I’m writing on right now weighs 210g in its silicone case and fits in my other jersey pocket.
Why not just put 25ml of sealant into the tub before you set off and not take any of that with you? To each his/her own I guess, but I shudder at the thought of dragging all that. 210g repair kit, plus 280g for your spare tub - nearly 500g total. Yeah, iPhone is heavy too, and if I could, I’d leave that at home as well.

bm0p700f
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by bm0p700f

why do you need a phone when riding. We used to get along without one once upon a time.

mattr
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Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

LOL.
When i started I had no phone (mobiles hasn't been invented) but every town, village and city i visited within 100 miles of home had at least one phone box. So i took 10 or 20p with me. That's your equivalent of a mobile!

When I emigrated there was one phone box within 10 miles that i was aware of.

Card only.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

aeroisnteverything wrote:
Fri Jan 18, 2019 2:43 pm
Calnago wrote:
Tue Jan 15, 2019 4:24 pm
I just put the pen there for scale, it’s really small and fits easily and comfortably in my jersey pocket. For comparison, my iPhone 10 which I’m writing on right now weighs 210g in its silicone case and fits in my other jersey pocket.
Why not just put 25ml of sealant into the tub before you set off and not take any of that with you? To each his/her own I guess, but I shudder at the thought of dragging all that. 210g repair kit, plus 280g for your spare tub - nearly 500g total. Yeah, iPhone is heavy too, and if I could, I’d leave that at home as well.
I don't put sealant in unless I have to, when/if I puncture. And it sure is convenient compared to the old days. Really makes riding tubulars a no brainer now for me. Seems to always work (but I know one day it won't, hence having a spare), and it's super easy... easier than changing a clincher tube. But once sealant is in there, it's in there... you can't get it out. That makes using that tire as a spare down the road impossible. So, the tires I never had to add sealant to, I can change when they get fairly worn for new ones, and use them as flexible, pliable spares. Also, with sealant sloshing around in there, it runs the risk of drying out and forming a big clump that can either 1) stick the tube inside together to itself, or 2) coagulate in such a spot that even though you can get air into it, it can create an imbalance in the tire that can be very noticeable when you're riding, in the same way that if your car tires were not balanced. In fact, last week this exact scenario occurred on a friends wheel, which he had purchased used, with a tubeless tubular on it. Probably has dried up sealant in it exactly as I described above. Will need to remove that tubular and put a new one on because even though it holds air just fine, the imbalance makes for a very disconcerting ride. Even made a little video on the weekend after I rode it trying to figure out what the heck was wrong...
For your viewing pleasure...

As for the "repair kit"... I like to be prepared. It gives me peace of mind, and I like to be self reliant, knowing that I have a modest amount of tools and the know how to fix most of whatever may occur on the road, be it to me or someone else. At least I'm not carrying around 500g of screeching, rubbing, hissing, disc brake hardware everywhere I go. Re the phone, it is my lifeline... I can call/text, take pictures, am reachable by those who care (no one Image ). Can get in touch with someone re a change of plans. Can get in touch with someone to make plans (meet for lunch, beer, whatever, or to hook up at such and such a spot and continue riding together). I enjoy going out for most of the day if I can, not just an hour here and there to see how fast I can do the gerbil loop. And like was already mentioned, how many public phone booths have you passed lately, maybe in the UK you have lots (love those phone booths), but here phone booths are largely a thing of the past and few and far between. Also, you say that "if you could", you would leave your phone at home. Then why don't you? I could leave my phone at home too, I choose not to. It's not a race, I like having it with me. I actually don't know anyone who doesn't have their phone with them on a ride.
bm0p700f wrote:
Fri Jan 18, 2019 3:53 pm
why do you need a phone when riding. We used to get along without one once upon a time.
We got along with alot of things once upon a time, but a mobile phone is something that I would have loved to have back then as much as I do now. I used to take a small camera with me. It only did one thing and weighed much more than my mobile phone of today. In addition to the reasons I mentioned earlier, one thing that is probably the most important of all is that, combined with say a Garmin 1030 (which I use), there is a feature called "Incident Detection". I often ride alone, and sometimes in areas where if something went terribly wrong, I could find myself on the other side of a guard rail out of sight of passing cars. If I was unconscious, the crash impact would trigger the incident detection and any contacts I have designated would be contacted immediately along with the GPS coordinates. So, I could be unconscious or so out of it I couldn't think, and help would already be on the way. Now that is a feature worth having in itself, even if you didn't have a camera, text, email and all the other niceties of modern day mobile phones. Yeah, I don't need electronic shifting, but I'm sure not leaving home without my phone. Many of my WW posts have been written while stopped having a coffee, lunch, or a beer somewhere out on the bike.
From my iPhone...
Image


Call me! :beerchug:
Last edited by Calnago on Fri Jan 18, 2019 7:01 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

markyboy
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Location: Bristol uk

by markyboy

I love the way they ride compared to clinchers,i carry tufo extreme which works a treat,even a small cut it works.I dont carry a spare as my repair kit is plenty for me.
Which includes tufo extreme co2 and some dyna plug racer for that really large hole.(have not used it yet)
http://www.dynaplug.com/racer.html
I would not use anything else :D
Also a lot of people dont feel confident on tubular as if they flat its like game over,but in fact i think its easier than clinchers,sealant in pump up and ride on :thumbup:
Takes only minutes.
Colnago master with campagnolo super record 12
Pinarello f8 with dura ace di2
Eddy merckx 69 ultegra disc winter bike ultegra r8000

markyboy
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by markyboy

double post
Colnago master with campagnolo super record 12
Pinarello f8 with dura ace di2
Eddy merckx 69 ultegra disc winter bike ultegra r8000

Jugi
Posts: 495
Joined: Sun Jun 24, 2018 8:10 am

by Jugi

Calnago wrote:
Fri Jan 18, 2019 7:01 pm
In fact, last week this exact scenario occurred on a friends wheel, which he had purchased used, with a tubeless tubular on it. Probably has dried up sealant in it exactly as I described above. Will need to remove that tubular and put a new one on because even though it holds air just fine, the imbalance makes for a very disconcerting ride. Even made a little video on the weekend after I rode it trying to figure out what the heck was wrong...
I’ll bet a testicle the disconcerting feeling comes from either:
- The tire has not been positioned properly when gluing, as the valve stem doesn’t appear to be pointing straight out of the rim. Therefore the valve stem might be obstructing the tire from seating properly.
- A bit too much electrical tape has been used as a ”valve stem silencer” inside the rim, which has prevented the valve stem from protruding as it should. That could also obstruct the tire from seating properly.

I have several wheels which exhibit similar symptoms on the repair stand, but are perfectly fine to ride. For mountain bikes it’s usually just an imbalance in the tire, as MTB tires have a reasonable mass so it doesn’t take much of an imbalance to make the bike wiggle while suspended.

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Calnago
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by Calnago

You can keep your testicle, but if you have cash... the tire is terribly mounted for sure, no doubt there. And perhaps that all it is, but descending down a hill it was anything but fine. I don’t know its history. It is very weighted towards the valve. Putting it in the truing stand will have that valve drop immediately and settle quickly at the bottom. A Bora, on the other hand is weighted upon layup to account for the valve of a tire when mounted. My Nemesis in a stand will spin with a wisp of air flowing and never really stop in the same place. I will be doing an autopsy on this tire to check within. Because even if the tire had no sealant it rides like it is filled with concrete. It’s garbage at this point as far as I’m concerned. Not what you want your tubular experience to be. You would never notice such an imbalance on a mountain bike since there are so many more severe imbalances on the terrain you’re riding. But on a nice smooth road, on a nice smooth road bike, that ride better be dead smooth too. If it’s not, you notice it. The first thing I did upon returning was to check it out as I knew there was an imbalance in there somewhere. And it’s clearly the wheel, most likely the tire.
Colnago C64 - The Naked Build; Colnago C60 - PR99; Trek Koppenberg - Where Emonda and Domane Meet;
Unlinked Builds (searchable): Colnago C59 - 5 Years Later; Trek Emonda SL Campagnolo SR; Special Colnago EPQ

Pinguin
Posts: 101
Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2018 9:28 pm

by Pinguin

markyboy wrote:
Fri Jan 18, 2019 8:06 pm
I love the way they ride compared to clinchers,i carry tufo extreme which works a treat,even a small cut it works.I dont carry a spare as my repair kit is plenty for me.
Which includes tufo extreme co2 and some dyna plug racer for that really large hole.(have not used it yet)
http://www.dynaplug.com/racer.html
I would not use anything else :D
Also a lot of people dont feel confident on tubular as if they flat its like game over,but in fact i think its easier than clinchers,sealant in pump up and ride on :thumbup:
Takes only minutes.
Dynaplug is for tubeless,not tubulars
I dont think that Dyna,Maxalami and other stuff works on tubulars

markyboy
Posts: 804
Joined: Wed Dec 29, 2010 10:22 pm
Location: Bristol uk

by markyboy

Pinguin wrote:
Sat Jan 19, 2019 7:51 am
markyboy wrote:
Fri Jan 18, 2019 8:06 pm
I love the way they ride compared to clinchers,i carry tufo extreme which works a treat,even a small cut it works.I dont carry a spare as my repair kit is plenty for me.
Which includes tufo extreme co2 and some dyna plug racer for that really large hole.(have not used it yet)
http://www.dynaplug.com/racer.html
I would not use anything else :D
Also a lot of people dont feel confident on tubular as if they flat its like game over,but in fact i think its easier than clinchers,sealant in pump up and ride on :thumbup:
Takes only minutes.
Dynaplug is for tubeless,not tubulars
I dont think that Dyna,Maxalami and other stuff works on tubulars
Maybe so but if sealant wont fix a large hole then surely you can plug it with dyna plug or any other plug there is out there just to get you home :noidea:
Colnago master with campagnolo super record 12
Pinarello f8 with dura ace di2
Eddy merckx 69 ultegra disc winter bike ultegra r8000

mattr
Posts: 4637
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 6:43 pm
Location: The Grim North.

by mattr

Depends on the hole. And how well it lines up between the tube and the tyre. And how much movement you get between the two of them.
And so on.

It might work, but it'd not surprise me if it was a fairly short term fix.

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