Alloy braking surface aero wheelset

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mpulsiv
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by mpulsiv

The reason latex is not recommended because carbon rims have sharp edges around the lip. I reached out to Veloflex and they are even against Bora wheels. There are slew of riders on WW that have been running latex in carbon wheels.
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Hex
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Joined: Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:30 am

by Hex

mpulsiv wrote:
Tue Sep 25, 2018 1:41 am
The reason latex is not recommended because carbon rims have sharp edges around the lip. I reached out to Veloflex and they are even against Bora wheels. There are slew of riders on WW that have been running latex in carbon wheels.
I thought latex is a no-no on carbon rims because of the heat build up transfer towards the inner tube (especially for those who ride on plenty of descents and constantly pull on the brakes) and that carbon was a no-no for cotton clinchers because of the sharp edges.

Is there anyone that makes an alloy clincher (alloy being the part where the tire and tube live along with the braking surface) with carbon deep section? Most of what I see in carbon/alloy construction appears to be carbon all but the braking surface.

alcatraz
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Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

It seems that the inside of the rim doesn't heat up enough to damage the latex tube.

But as some people have written in the past. The riders that would like to argue against this maybe aren't around to do so.

Run latex in the rear only for a while. You can see for yourself how they hold up.

The rr benefits of latex will be larger in the rear so it's a pretty easy choice. The next question is if you're already on 50gr butyls and get a heavier latex, are there any real savings? I read somewhere 2.5w for butyl and 1.5w for latex (per wheel, average thickness)

Hex
Posts: 55
Joined: Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:30 am

by Hex

alcatraz wrote:
Tue Oct 02, 2018 7:54 am
It seems that the inside of the rim doesn't heat up enough to damage the latex tube.

But as some people have written in the past. The riders that would like to argue against this maybe aren't around to do so.

Run latex in the rear only for a while. You can see for yourself how they hold up.

The rr benefits of latex will be larger in the rear so it's a pretty easy choice. The next question is if you're already on 50gr butyls and get a heavier latex, are there any real savings? I read somewhere 2.5w for butyl and 1.5w for latex (per wheel, average thickness)
Why would latex mostly benefit the rear? What about the jitter on your hands and arms?

I'm riding tubeless now but when doing latex I was using ~50ish gram vredesteins. The weight is not an issue for me. Its about the feel.

I'll go around the loss in watts (if any) by getting the deeper section wheels. Right now riding 22mm cero wheels.

Eyeing the DT Swiss oxic 32mm deep.
Full alloy, not so light, but 32mm....

Would Veloflex be against Mavic Cosmic Pros? Are they now alloy rim (clincher well and braking surface being alloy) with the carbon fairing...

alcatraz
Posts: 1294
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:19 am

by alcatraz

I think because of the bit of extra weight there.

Anyway the point was about the safety. It's pretty safe to try latex in the rear if someone is tempted but reluctant to make the transition.

/a

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