Which Hubs Are The Fastest?

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Scrench
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2011 3:02 am

by Scrench

C'mon Guys,

I know collectively you've tried them all, so which ones spin the longest with the least effort and have almost zero friction. Trying to build a racing only set using Zipp 202 rims, completely dissatisfied with the Zipp V9 hubs. So forget the rims, which hubs should I pour money into?

Thanks!
Scrench

by Weenie


Marin
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Location: Vienna Austria

by Marin

They're basically all the same, hub friction doesn't consume a significant amount of power.

If you want long-spinning hubs, remove the bearing seals, flush out the grease and lube with thin oil. You could also buy expensive bearings that already have this done.

You'll be saving 0,2W until you ride in the wet.

You can also only remove the seals facing inside the hub and use very thin grease, but it just doesn't make a lot of sense.

Get some nice, light, pretty hubs that have well though-out flange spacing, tight tolerances and good bearing adjustment and ignore the spinning.

Multebear
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Joined: Sat May 02, 2015 10:11 pm

by Multebear

CK R45 with ceramic bearings. Case closed.

Marin
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Location: Vienna Austria

by Marin

Nice but on the heavy side...

morganb
Posts: 630
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by morganb

The freest spinning hubs I've owned are cheap Bitex hubs, multiple sets. White Industries are a close second. This includes DTs, Mavic, King, and so on.

Delorre
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by Delorre

morganb wrote:The freest spinning hubs I've owned are cheap Bitex hubs, multiple sets. White Industries are a close second. This includes DTs, Mavic, King, and so on.


By hand, or real world loaded testing on the road? Seems very difficult to perform imo :?

oreoboreo
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by oreoboreo

morganb wrote:The freest spinning hubs I've owned are cheap Bitex hubs, multiple sets. White Industries are a close second. This includes DTs, Mavic, King, and so on.


+1 I share the same thoughts. I rarely ride my CK anymore
Let's finish the ride with a 20% grade.

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Jhomewood
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by Jhomewood

My CK never seemed to roll super well. it lasted year and years without service though. Zipp hubs are actually very good at free spinning. i suspect anything with ceramic in it would be good. Look at the WMFG hubs then swap out to ceramics.

bm0p700f
in the industry
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by bm0p700f

you cannot access rolling resistance without load therefore any user assesment is not real. They are all about the same in the real world with a power meter on an indoor track the difference between hubs will be much smaller than the error measurement in the power meter in otherwords any difference is not statisically significant. as hub rolling resistance is in the order of 1W at 25mph or less (0.5W is 1W for this argument) and error in power measurements is 1 to 2% at 25 mph I may be producing 250W or more so error is bigger than power consumed by the hub.

Scrench
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2011 3:02 am

by Scrench

I did notice when I relubed my Zipp V9 hubs that after I degreased the bearings and they were bone dry, they would spin forever. Once I packed them full of slick Honey, they wouldn't even spin one full rotation. Has anyone tried using something like Mobile 1, something that doesn't jam them up but still provides lubrication and protection? Did it make any difference? Should I relube with less or does it make any difference at all?

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ergott
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by ergott

If you ride in a vacuum you would be faster too.

If any sort of durability is important to you, use properly greased and sealed bearings. Oil will work fine for controlled environments like the velodrome and still require frequent service/replacement. Once contaminated, the best bearings in the world will get damaged (http://tinyurl.com/y9rwyz5j) and render them no better than any other bearing out there.

Phil Wood are my first choice for install and forget. They are sealed well and with plenty of quality grease. If you think they make you any slower you've been sold snake oil.
Last edited by ergott on Thu Oct 19, 2017 11:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

Scrench
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2011 3:02 am

by Scrench

ergott,

Thanks for that link to the most comprehensive bearing problem list I've ever seen. Many things on there I would not have thought to look for. Every one should look at it and copy it.

whosatthewheel
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by whosatthewheel

Rolling resistance under load is only something you will notice on the track... if you do pursuit, you can lose a race by a tenth of a second or less... in that scenario I can see having a marginally better rolling hub giving you the edge.

Otherwise, they are all the same and you should always go for the most reliable. Hubs are there to give you grief, not joy... so your choice should be leaning towards those that give you the least grief

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kavitator
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by kavitator

Gokiso :)

whosatthewheel
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by whosatthewheel

kavitator wrote:Gokiso :)


The rear flanges look exceedingly close, giving a dreadful bracing angle, only suitable for very deep rims

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by Weenie


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