2018 Campagnolo Scirocco C17 wheels came out to 1800 grams!

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mpulsiv
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by mpulsiv

Per advertised specs, 2018 wheels dropped by ~ 70 grams. I was expecting ~1654 grams but these wheel came out to 1800 grams! Does anyone happen to know whether the hubs are cup-and-cone or sealed cartridge? I sent email inquiry to Campagnolo but haven't heard back. The hubs are very quiet, like Shimano. If I had to guess, it's cup-and-cone. Another surprise was the rim tape. I was under the impression that these have "MoMag" (no rim tape necessary) like Zonda wheels.

www.bikerumor.com/2017/05/16/campagnolo ... heelset-qr
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Hellgate
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by Hellgate

See the Technical Manual section.

https://www.campagnolo.com/US/en/Support/support

Alumen
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by Alumen

The hubs are looking exactly the same as my C15, so with industry bearings = no cup cone unfortunately.

What can I say about them ? They are certainly aero, it is not a lightweight wheel. But you don't notice the weight, at least I don't. They are fast, responsive, solid and they don't flex (my weight is 90kg). So a rather stiff wheel, without being uncomfortable.

But now the negative side of them. I looked at freehub (Shimano) after 2.5k of usage and you could clearly see the sprocket was eating into the freehub. I was kind of surprised by that. I would expect that to happen after at least 5k/6k or so. Not that it impacted the performance though, but still...

But I would definitely recommend this wheel. The look and feel of these wheels does match up with wheels that cost you twice as much.
CAAD 10 2015

AJS914
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by AJS914

Bike Rumor probably weighed the wheels without skewers.

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mpulsiv
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by mpulsiv

AJS914 wrote:Bike Rumor probably weighed the wheels without skewers.


I don't think Bike Rumor weighted these wheels. The specs were released to public directly from Campagnolo. By the way, it's 1800 grams + 120 grams for skewers.
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AJS914
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by AJS914

Do you have a Hyperglide freehub? It weighs 70 grams more.

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mpulsiv
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by mpulsiv

Alumen wrote:The hubs are looking exactly the same as my C15, so with industry bearings = no cup cone unfortunately.

What can I say about them ? They are certainly aero, it is not a lightweight wheel. But you don't notice the weight, at least I don't. They are fast, responsive, solid and they don't flex (my weight is 90kg). So a rather stiff wheel, without being uncomfortable.

But now the negative side of them. I looked at freehub (Shimano) after 2.5k of usage and you could clearly see the sprocket was eating into the freehub. I was kind of surprised by that. I would expect that to happen after at least 5k/6k or so. Not that it impacted the performance though, but still...

But I would definitely recommend this wheel. The look and feel of these wheels does match up with wheels that cost you twice as much.


Bummer. I should have got Zonda C17 instead. ~ 270 grams lighter, no rim tape required and cup-and-cone hubs.

There are only 2 hubs that I'm aware of that will not eat up your hub. White Industries T11 and Shimano Dura Ace, both titanium freehub body. Another alternative is to use one-piece SRAM Red XG-1190 cassette.
Last edited by mpulsiv on Fri Jul 07, 2017 11:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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ferrarista
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by ferrarista

Lower end Campy wheels use regular bearings and rim tape. Its always been like that. If you want no holes and cup-cone bearings it starts with Zonda.
Campy shimano freehub is made of steel so should not mark as easily as the aluminum shimano freehub they use on the Bora wheels. Those freehubs have a white ceramic treatment to make it harder.
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mpulsiv
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by mpulsiv

ferrarista wrote:Lower end Campy wheels use regular bearings and rim tape. Its always been like that. If you want no holes and cup-cone bearings it starts with Zonda.
Campy shimano freehub is made of steel so should not mark as easily as the aluminum shimano freehub they use on the Bora wheels. Those freehubs have a white ceramic treatment to make it harder.


Oh, that's good know. How good are sealed bearings in contrast to their cup-and-cone? The sole purpose is to use these as dedicated race wheels on dry days with low miles through annual season. I was considering Zonda, making an assumption that Scirocco was just deeper.
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tomycs
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by tomycs

At 1800g they are lighter than my old C15 Scirroco, not a climbing wheelset but they've served me well in the pan flat area my parents live in. If you want Zondas you should be able to sell them w.o. losing much, for people riding Aksiums or RS11 they would be a step up.

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ferrarista
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by ferrarista

mpulsiv wrote:
ferrarista wrote:Lower end Campy wheels use regular bearings and rim tape. Its always been like that. If you want no holes and cup-cone bearings it starts with Zonda.
Campy shimano freehub is made of steel so should not mark as easily as the aluminum shimano freehub they use on the Bora wheels. Those freehubs have a white ceramic treatment to make it harder.


Oh, that's good know. How good are sealed bearings in contrast to their cup-and-cone? The sole purpose is to use these as dedicated race wheels on dry days with low miles through annual season. I was considering Zonda, making an assumption that Scirocco was just deeper.


Well the stock bearings are not great really, but can easily be fixed by swapping to better bearings like SKF, stainless or stainless/ceramic. Another thing that people tend to do is to tighten too much the bolt on the freehub side. It compresses more the bearings so it doesn't turn as smoothly. What I do is tighten just enough and apply a small line of Loctite on the axle threads perpendicularly just to be safe. Once you tighten the quick release it should not loosen anyways.

Cup-cone bearings are better and lighter, but the seals also drag a lot on the axle when new. One thing to do is put small cuts on the seals facing the axle so that it doesn't drag. makes it much smoother. If the roads you race in are mostly flat and are on the heavier side, then the Scirocco will do just fine. They should be stiffer and maybe more aero. If you have lots of hills I would go more with the Zonda as they are 200gr+ less.
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mpulsiv
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by mpulsiv

ferrarista wrote:
Well the stock bearings are not great really, but can easily be fixed by swapping to better bearings like SKF, stainless or stainless/ceramic. Another thing that people tend to do is to tighten too much the bolt on the freehub side. It compresses more the bearings so it doesn't turn as smoothly. What I do is tighten just enough and apply a small line of Loctite on the axle threads perpendicularly just to be safe. Once you tighten the quick release it should not loosen anyways.

Cup-cone bearings are better and lighter, but the seals also drag a lot on the axle when new. One thing to do is put small cuts on the seals facing the axle so that it doesn't drag. makes it much smoother. If the roads you race in are mostly flat and are on the heavier side, then the Scirocco will do just fine. They should be stiffer and maybe more aero. If you have lots of hills I would go more with the Zonda as they are 200gr+ less.


Thanks for input. Out of curiosity, where could I find SKF bearings for it? Is there a specific part # that I should search for or it's pretty much universal for sealed hubs? I assume the hub is tightened at the factory and one should only tighten it harder when the play develop over time, right?

Is the freehub hardened (white) on Zonda's as well?

Road races are typically rolling hills with some punchy hills and crits are flat. Looks like Zonda's are ~270 grams lighter, which is an advantage for constant attacks.
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Hellgate
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by Hellgate

Go to a local bearing/fastener shop. You'll pay a bit more, but you get real SKF, not China fakes. If it sounds too good to be true it probably is. The Web is flooded with fake bearings.

Japanese NSKs are very nice bearings too.

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ferrarista
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by ferrarista

mpulsiv wrote:Thanks for input. Out of curiosity, where could I find SKF bearings for it? Is there a specific part # that I should search for or it's pretty much universal for sealed hubs? I assume the hub is tightened at the factory and one should only tighten it harder when the play develop over time, right?

Is the freehub hardened (white) on Zonda's as well?

Road races are typically rolling hills with some punchy hills and crits are flat. Looks like Zonda's are ~270 grams lighter, which is an advantage for constant attacks.


Like Hellgate said, local bearing shops is the best to get SKF bearings. Japanese bearings also are good. Bearings size is 6903 front and back. You need four of them.
Campagnolo wheels come equipped with a preload adjuster on the left side of the hub. You untighten the small hex bolt and turn clockwise or counterclockwise to adjust till you don't have any play. You usually adjust while the wheel is on the bike with quick release tightened.

Zonda come with the steel freehub for shimano. You will have to buy the white one separately.
Edit: The new Zonda C17 do come with aluminum shimano freehub.
Last edited by ferrarista on Wed Jul 12, 2017 2:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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mpulsiv
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by mpulsiv

Still no word from Campagnolo from service@campagnolona.com I reached out to them about a week ago.
It doesn't look like they are going to update 2018 catalog anytime soon.
Per specs from 2017 http://www.campagnolo.com/media/files/0 ... o_2017.pdf

Zonda Pros:
~270 grams lighter
No rim tape
Better hub (cup-and-cone)
Brass nipples
Zonda Cons:
Shallower (e.g. 24-27mm tall)
Aluminum freehub. Hardened with white ceramic coating?

Scirocco Pros:
Deeper (35mm tall)
Aluminum freehub. Hardened with white ceramic coating.
Scirocco Cons:
Rim tape required
Aluminum nipples
Lower quality hub

I may end up shipping Scirocco back for refund and blame myself for not looking at detailed specs.
Racing is a three-dimensional high-speed chess game, involving hundreds of pieces on the board.

:arrow: CBA = Chronic Bike Addiction
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