Wheels for a fat lad

Everything about building wheels, glueing tubs, etc.
moonoi
Posts: 439
Joined: Sat Nov 21, 2015 3:04 pm

by moonoi

I was pretty much same weight as you and have used all of the following in all kinds of terrain without any issues braking or wheel failures due to my fat ass.

Reynolds Assault SLG
Roval CLX64
Zipp 808 NSW
Vision Metron 55
Campagnolo Shamal Mille
Campagnolo Eurus

Seriously your weight isn't a limiting factor, Reynolds and Vision don't have a rider weight limit and just recommend checking the wheels more often if you're heavier than the norm.

Roval the limit is 108Kg but even over this I had no issues.


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by Weenie


MiddMan
Posts: 160
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2015 4:54 pm

by MiddMan

I'm same height and a bit lighter than you, but still no lightweight at 90kg + so this is a question I've been looking into as well. Zipp 404s have a total limit (rider + bike) of 250 pounds, so you'd still be under the limit. There are certainly other options out there too and if I come across the, I'll let you know.

Do you live in a particularly mountainous area? Or just hilly? Your use (or non use) of breaks will vary and depend on both terrain and skill. I live in a place with mountain passes with 1500-2000 feet elevation gains and usually only use my breaks on sharp corners or switchbacks. This is an acquired skill, but the worry with carbon rims is continuous breaking--just don't 'ride' the breaks.

EvilEuro
Posts: 172
Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:03 am

by EvilEuro

I am smaller than you, but was once much heavier. I had the same dilemma and ended up using Campagnolo Shamal Ultra 2-Way wheels as I rode my weight down from 127kg to 85kg.

I went through two set of wheels and only got a second pair because Campagnolo released their C17 series with the 17mm internal rim width. The wheels have never gone out of true, have been smooth as butter to ride, spin up quickly, and brake great. I am quite happy with them and also enjoy getting to ride them with tubeless tires.

Shamal, Eurus, Zonda... any of those Campagnolo wheelsets will do you well and you can simply purchase them from your favourite dealer versus having to try and find someone to build them up for you.

merser
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Jun 24, 2017 8:05 pm

by merser

Few shouts for campags!

I think I'll speak to both wheel builders suggested here tomorrow and ask them their thoughts. I'll ask them about the campags; it'll be interesting to hear their perspectives.

I'll also do a bit more research on their range. I noted today their 'G3 technology' actually suggests it is suitable "even for heavier people" so that's promising.

That's incredible weight loss mate!! Well done.

Thanks again everyone.

Jamie


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fa63
Posts: 2274
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:26 am
Location: Atlanta, GA, US

by fa63

Another vote for Zonda C17. This from another fat cyclist who rides a custom wheelset (DT Swiss R460 rims / Dura Ace hubs) but misses his old Zonda wheels dearly :)

TurboKoo
Posts: 446
Joined: Wed Oct 29, 2008 7:55 pm

by TurboKoo

Shimano wheels doesn't have any weight limits. Maybe RS81's or step-up to Dura Ace level?
Scott Foil
Shimano 9150
Shimano FCR-9100-P
Shimano C60 tubulars

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WinterRider
Posts: 402
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2013 2:46 pm

by WinterRider

"even for heavier people" per the G3.

Curious as to Campy's idea of heavier.. so I e'd them.

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fa63
Posts: 2274
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:26 am
Location: Atlanta, GA, US

by fa63

From the Campy website:

"All Campagnolo wheels are constructed to meet the highest standards of resistance and durability. If you weigh over 109 kg/240 lbs we advise you not to use this product. Non compliance with this warning can damage the product irreversibly. If you weigh 82 kg/180 lbs or more, you must be especially vigilant and have your bicycle inspected more frequently (than someone weighing less than 82 kg/180 lbs)".

https://www.campagnolo.com/US/en/Suppor ... the_wheels

hlvd
Posts: 143
Joined: Sat Mar 05, 2016 4:54 pm

by hlvd

Bontrager don't state weight limits and Mavic state 120kg.

merser
Posts: 31
Joined: Sat Jun 24, 2017 8:05 pm

by merser

Spoke to Malcom at cycle clinic. He certainly knows his stuff. He suggested one of his 31mm alloy offerings with high spoke numbers. No doubt it sounds like it could carry a truck and they are a lot cheaper than i was expecting. So is in the running. I don't think they look as pretty as the carbon offerings, but i probably need to think less about aesthetics and more about not breaking my face.

FIJIGabe
Posts: 1411
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2012 6:07 pm
Location: The Lone Star State

by FIJIGabe

I'll be honest with you: you aren't much bigger than I am, and certainly not bigger than I was, at my largest. I'm currently 6'4" and weight about 100kg (fluctuate between 99 and 101, depending on what I'm training for). I ride Zipp 404 Firecrests. Before that, when I was larger, I used Zipp 303's and never had an issue with them. Prior to that? Reynolds DV3K's clinchers. Again, never a problem. All of those wheels were 24h rear wheels (the 303's were radial on the NDS, and flexed when accelerating).

The only wheel I ever had spokes break on me were my second-gen Bontrager Race X Lites, which suffered two broken spokes. The wheels were repaired under warranty, and it turned out they weren't properly tensioned. Once that was corrected, I never had a problem, again.
Madone 9 https://goo.gl/7UwZpV
Crockett https://goo.gl/f5PdCN
Madone 5 https://goo.gl/cMdyFo

Madone 4, Cobia. I own a lot of Treks.

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WinterRider
Posts: 402
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2013 2:46 pm

by WinterRider

fa63 wrote:From the Campy website:

"All Campagnolo wheels are constructed to meet the highest standards of resistance and durability. If you weigh over 109 kg/240 lbs we advise you not to use this product. Non compliance with this warning can damage the product irreversibly. If you weigh 82 kg/180 lbs or more, you must be especially vigilant and have your bicycle inspected more frequently (than someone weighing less than 82 kg/180 lbs)".

https://www.campagnolo.com/US/en/Suppor ... the_wheels


Thanks for the link .. I did not find that at their site.

Campy also states: 'Using tires with a larger diameter and a frame that respects the standards will help to increase the lifetime of the wheels.'

I get the first part .. 'frame that respects the standards' is up to what interpretation? Assume one that is stiff enough to not over tax the rear wheel on standing climbing?

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