2015 Campagnolo Skeleton Brakes and Wide Rims

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gitsome
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by gitsome

Hi
Thanks im thinking of enve 3.4 or 7.8 rims which are quite wide so im not sure what will be esp since new design is so wide, 29 mm i think tho not at brake track

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Calnago
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by Calnago

It's not so much the width as the overall height of the tire that could be the issue. And that depends on a few things like placement of brake bridge etc. Also, Campy skeleton brake arms when slack will often touch the tops of a larger tire but when cabled up and adjusted properly the clearance is fine since it pulls the arms away from the tops.
But wait, are you saying the brake track itself is 28mm wide? That would likely mean that the tire (if a clincher) is probably sitting very tall as well. The extra width of the rim if indeed that wide would force a quite open position if the Skelton calipers which actually might cause the arms to touch the top of the tire in this case, but I haven't actually tried it on any rims that wide. Guess you'd just have to try it to find out for sure keeping in mind the issues I just pointed out. I'm sure it would be very tight if it does fit. Good luck.
As for the Chorus skeletons, they did give those a tad more clearance at some point around that time frame but I can't remember exactly which year that was.
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gitsome
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by gitsome

Yikes i hadnt considered the height aspect...the new emves are indeed very wide which makes them attractive but complicated i guess. Our local enve dealer in nyc is total douchebag so we dont count on much assistance from them unles directly handing them money and once thryve gotten it your kicled out the door back to square one. Maybe i will ask enve directly though as u say could be contingent on frame brakemount placement...not brake calipers

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brenmitch
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by brenmitch

I have a C59 which has quite a small amount of clearance in the front fork. I currently ride with Enve 4.5s and Bora Ultra 50s. Absolutely no issues with width of the rim and adjustment on 2015 Record skeleton brakes. To Calnago's point, Campy updated the 2015 Chorus brakes to have a slightly newer geometry, but did not roll those changes in to the Record or Super Record brakes (likely because those have little bearings in them and Chorus does not).

I only ever have issues with tire clearance vertically. A wide clincher rim plumps the tire out and makes for a more tangent transition from the curved part of the tire to the rim, which usually means a given tire also expands radially more. You may run into issues with 25-28 mm tires rubbing the center part of your brake, fork, or rear brake bridge, but with proper adjustment you shouldn't need special brake pads to run up to a 27 mm external rim (like the front Enve "4" in the 4.5). I have no personal experience with 29 mm wide rims like the new 3.4 or Roval CLX 50 in skeleton brakes.
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gitsome
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by gitsome

Thanks, i was considering reynolds which are around 28mm wide, though possibly not at the brake track, as well as the new enve 3.4 or 4.5 should they ever get re-issued wider like the new 3.4 which are very wide indeed. Think theyd manage that? I also need to see if my frame can accomodate such wheels as its an older 2006 model year...

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Yes, the wide front wheel of an ENVE 3.4, when coupled with a 25mm Conti 4000sii, will not even fit all the way into the dropouts before jamming against the underside of a C59 fork, for example. And that's before any brake clearance even begins to comes into play.
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gitsome
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by gitsome

Thats what im afraid of for my moots sl by the chainstays would be too wide near the bb or brake track. Enve told me should be fine w their fork in front...its definitely a new generation of road bike emerging no doubt about it

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Calnago
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by Calnago

gitsome wrote:...its definitely a new generation of road bike emerging no doubt about it

New generation of roadbike, or mountain bike?
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gitsome
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by gitsome

Road

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Sorry, I was being a bit sarcastic, I know you meant road. But with all the changes happening or being marketed in hopes of happening, I think the "new generation of road" bike is actually becoming more like a mountain bike. I'm calling it the "mountainization" of the road bike. Ha. I don't need a 42 tooth rear sprocket on my finest example of a road bike. Or discs. Or bigger than 25mm tires. But then, I only ride on the "road"... and for me that's pavement. Not that those things couldn't be perfectly useful on a "gravel grinder" or whatever you want to call a bicycle that you ride on non paved roads or trails. I just kind of think some of the recent trends (and yes, I'm still going to call them trends for the moment) are actually taking the finest road bikes a step backwards rather than forward.
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gitsome
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by gitsome

I guess thats always valid and debateable, who knows in 10 yrs theyll be going back to 21mm wheels and rim brakes but for the time it seems stanidards and dimensions and definitely changing.
Im amazed (and happy) at how much focus and importance seems to now being given to ride quality, comfort, stability etc over just stiffenss and weight (i know this is ww...and i do still love a featherwieght) alone. That seems a good thing to me. And yes its def converging w mtb tech thats already out there for sure. I also agree it might in the end be better to have bike that specialize in their usage instead of a one-bike-do-it-all though theres also the fullfillment of a hybrid dream thats more realizible now w fewer tradeoffs than ever before too which is exciting

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Yup... some good, some not so good... I like the slightly wider rims and tires myself, as I'm a bigger guy. I don't think we'll be going back to 20mm rims and 21mm tires anytime soon, but I do wonder where the dust will settle as to the optimal width. For me personally, I think I've found it, at least for the road. I think it varies depending on rider, roads, and purpose. "Do-it-all" whatevers are fine, but they never do one thing really superbly. So, if you're really into that one thing, whatever it is,... it's nice to have equipment that matches your passion.
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gitsome
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by gitsome

Yup. It just makes upgrading older bikes more complicated and i fear will make any resale value low to nil if ever necessary

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Calnago
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by Calnago

Yes, and I don't have a problem with newer, better technology rendering old stuff obsolete. That happens all the time. What I have a problem is with new stuff that isn't better, and often worse, being adopted because it's either cheaper to produce, or used as an excuse to change the market entirely and create a perceived "need". And I realize that's part of the very definition of marketing... to create that perceived need. And making something cheaper to produce is not a sin either, as long as the resultant product is as good as it's predecessor.
Oh well... that's progress... I'm just along for the ride.
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gitsome
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by gitsome

True indeed i guess if it aint broke dont fix it or at least think twice!

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